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Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
15.02.2018
Fingerprints of quantum entanglement
Fingerprints of quantum entanglement
Quantum entanglement is a key feature of a quantum computer. Yet, how can we verify that a quantum computer indeed incorporates a large-scale entanglement? Using conventional methods is hard since they require a large number of repeated measurements. Aleksandra Dimić from the University of Belgrade and Borivoje Dakić from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna have developed a novel method where in many cases even a single experimental run suffices to prove the presence of entanglement.
Computer Science/Telecom - Environment/Sustainable Development
14.02.2018
The uncertain unicycle that taught itself and how it's helping AI make good decisions
The uncertain unicycle that taught itself and how it’s helping AI make good decisions
Cambridge researchers are pioneering a form of machine learning that starts with only a little prior knowledge and continually learns from the world around it. This is just like a human would learn. We don't start knowing everything. We learn things incrementally, from only a few examples, and we know when we are not yet confident in our understanding Zoubin Ghahramani In the centre of the screen is a tiny unicycle.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics - Computer Science/Telecom
02.02.2018
Automating materials design
Automating materials design
For decades, materials scientists have taken inspiration from the natural world. They'll identify a biological material that has some desirable trait - such as the toughness of bones or conch shells - and reverse-engineer it. Then, once they've determined the material's "microstructure," they'll try to approximate it in human-made materials.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
30.01.2018
Applying Machine Learning to the Universe's Mysteries
Applying Machine Learning to the Universe’s Mysteries
Computers can beat chess champions, simulate star explosions, and forecast global climate. We are even teaching them to be infallible problem-solvers and fast learners. And now, physicists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and their collaborators have demonstrated that computers are ready to tackle the universe's greatest mysteries.
Computer Science/Telecom
23.01.2018
Drones learn to navigate autonomously by imitating cars and bicycles
Drones learn to navigate autonomously by imitating cars and bicycles
All today's commercial drones use GPS, which works fine above building roofs and in high altitudes. But what, when the drones have to navigate autonomously at low altitude among tall buildings or in the dense, unstructured city streets with cars, cyclists or pedestrians suddenly crossing their way?
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
23.01.2018
Neighboring glaciers may cause each other to melt faster
Two of the most rapidly changing glaciers in Antarctica, which are leading contributors to sea-level rise, may behave as an interacting system rather than separate entities, according to a new analysis of radar data. A new study shows that a large and potentially unstable Antarctic glacier may be melting farther inland than previously thought and that this melting could affect the stability of another large glacier nearby - an important finding for understanding and projecting ice sheet contributions to sea-level rise.
Computer Science/Telecom
22.01.2018
Science Minister praises 'brilliant' robotics at Imperial
Science Minister praises 'brilliant’ robotics at Imperial
The new Science and Universities Minister Sam Gyimah praised the 'brilliant' robotics being developed at Imperial College London. The Minister chose Imperial for his first official visit to a university and announced a 70 million funding boost for UK medicines. This investment will not only support high-value, highly-skilled jobs but will develop lifesaving treatments that could change lives across the UK.
Computer Science/Telecom - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.01.2018
Computational Method Speeds Hunt for New Antibiotics
New algorithm reduces search time from hundreds of years to mere hours A team of American and Russian computer scientists has developed an algorithm that can rapidly search databases to discover novel variants of known antibiotics - a potential boon in fighting antibiotic resistance. In just a few hours, the algorithm, called VarQuest , identified 10 times more variants of peptidic natural products, or PNPs, than all previous PNP discovery efforts combined, the researchers report in the latest issue of the journal Nature Microbiology.
Computer Science/Telecom - Mathematics
22.01.2018
Location detection when GPS doesn't work
Location detection when GPS doesn’t work
With billions of GPS devices in use today, people are beginning to take it for granted that services on their handheld devices will be location-aware. But GPS doesn't work well indoors, and it's not precise enough for several potentially useful applications, such as locating medical equipment in hospitals or pallets of goods in warehouses, or helping emergency responders navigate unfamiliar buildings.
Computer Science/Telecom
18.01.2018
Algorithm improves integration of refugees
A new machine learning algorithm developed by Stanford researchers could help governments and resettlement agencies find the best places for refugees to relocate, depending on their particular skills and backgrounds. As the world faces its largest crisis of displaced people since World War II, a new algorithm developed by Stanford researchers could help countries resettle refugees in a way that boosts their employment success and overall integration.
Computer Science/Telecom - Chemistry
15.01.2018
Protocells with unpredictable complexity tamed by artificial intelligence
In new University of Glasgow research published today (January 15) in the journal PNAS , a robot equipped with artificial intelligence was able to build unstable oil-in-water droplets as models for new artificial life forms. It was also able to predict their properties ahead of time even though conventional physical methods failed to do so.
Architecture - Computer Science/Telecom
15.01.2018
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
15.01.2018
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton blooms
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton blooms
Phytoplankton blooms are one of the most important factors contributing to the efficiency of the carbon pump in the North Atlantic Ocean. To better understand this phenomenon, the ERC remOcean 1 project, led by researchers at the Laboratoire d'Ocanographie de Villefranche (CNRS/UPMC), has developed a new class of robots: biogeochemical profiling floats, the first robots able to collect data in the ocean throughout the year.
Innovation/Technology - Computer Science/Telecom
05.01.2018
The strength of digitalisation and a strong community
The strength of digitalisation and a strong community
25 spin-offs were founded at ETH Zurich last year. This equals the previous year's record level for new ETH spin-offs.
Computer Science/Telecom
04.01.2018
Cybersecurity in self-driving cars: U-M releases threat identification tool
Cybersecurity in self-driving cars: U-M releases threat identification tool
Mcity report gives new insights into automated vehicle vulnerabilities ANN ARBOR-Instead of taking you home from work, your self-driving car delivers you to a desolate road, where it pulls off on the shoulder and stops. You call your vehicle to pick you up from a store and instead you get a text message: Send $100 worth of Bitcoin to this account and it'll be right over.
Computer Science/Telecom - Chemistry
26.12.2017
Five AI breakthroughs that could change the face of science
Five AI breakthroughs that could change the face of science
Following years of research, AI is starting to have an impact on the way science is done, as these five Imperial studies from 2017 show. Barely a week has gone by in 2017 without warnings in the media about how Artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics is threatening to make all human workers redundant.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Computer Science/Telecom
26.12.2017
Looking back at 2017 (1/2)
Coral reefs that can survive global warming, an expedition around Antarctica, a booster for genetic research, a personnal virtual heart, a National Center for Data Science... Some of the EPFL's research and milestones that marked the year 2017.
Computer Science/Telecom - Life Sciences
21.12.2017
Researchers publish the first comprehensive list of vascular plant species of the Americas
Researchers publish the first comprehensive list of vascular plant species of the Americas
ANN ARBOR-An international research team has assembled the first complete list of all known vascular plant species in the Americas. The searchable database contains nearly 125,000 species representing one-third of all known vascular plants worldwide. Vascular plants are land plants with specialized internal-transport and vertical-support tissues.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Computer Science/Telecom
20.12.2017
New software can model natural light from the occupants' perspective
New software can model natural light from the occupants' perspective
OCUVIS, a visualization software developed by a soon-to-be-launched EPFL spin-off, lets architects simulate 3D building models to assess the performance of natural light indoors. After specifying the ambient conditions, architects can view the visual and non-visual characteristics of the resulting natural light in their designs.
Computer Science/Telecom - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
20.12.2017
Memristors power quick-learning neural network
Memristors power quick-learning neural network
ANN ARBOR-A new type of neural network made with memristors can dramatically improve the efficiency of teaching machines to think like humans. The network, called a reservoir computing system, could predict words before they are said during conversation, and help predict future outcomes based on the present.
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