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Health - May 26
Health
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new X-ray contrast agent. The contrast agent is easier to use and distributes into all blood vessels more reliably, increasing the precision of vascular imaging. This reduces the number of animals required in research experiments. Various diseases in humans and animals - such as tumors, strokes or chronic kidney disease - damage the blood vessels.
Environment - May 26
Environment

The world's deep oceans are warming at a slower rate than the surface, but it's still not good news for deep-sea creatures according to an international study.

Life Sciences - May 25
Life Sciences

Using a combination of behavioural trials in the field, computational visual modelling and a computer-based detection experiment, the study published in PNAS reveals that, while glass frog translucency does act as camouflage, the mechanism differs from that of true transparency.

Chemistry - May 26
Chemistry

Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials.

Life Sciences - May 25
Life Sciences

A team led by scientists from the Institut Jacques Monod (CNRS/Université de Paris) 1 have shown that French prehistory was punctuated by two waves of migration: the first during the Neolithic period, about 6,300 years ago, the second during the Bronze Age, about 4,200 years ago.


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Health - Life Sciences - 26.05.2020
Increased Usability and Precision in Vascular Imaging
Increased Usability and Precision in Vascular Imaging
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new X-ray contrast agent. The contrast agent is easier to use and distributes into all blood vessels more reliably, increasing the precision of vascular imaging. This reduces the number of animals required in research experiments. Various diseases in humans and animals - such as tumors, strokes or chronic kidney disease - damage the blood vessels.

Environment - 26.05.2020
The deep ocean is warming slowly - but dramatic changes are ahead
The deep ocean is warming slowly - but dramatic changes are ahead
The world's deep oceans are warming at a slower rate than the surface, but it's still not good news for deep-sea creatures according to an international study. The research, led by University of Queensland PhD student Isaac Brito-Morales , looked at how ocean life was responding to climate change. “We used a metric known as climate velocity which defines the likely speed and direction a species shifts as the ocean warms,” Mr Brito-Morales said.

Chemistry - Physics - 26.05.2020
Finds electrical fields can throw a curveball
Finds electrical fields can throw a curveball
Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials. MIT researchers have discovered a phenomenon that could be harnessed to control the movement of tiny particles floating in suspension. This approach, which requires simply applying an external electric field, may ultimately lead to new ways of performing certain industrial or medical processes that require separation of tiny suspended materials.

Life Sciences - 25.05.2020
Through glass frogs' translucent camouflage
Through glass frogs’ translucent camouflage
Using a combination of behavioural trials in the field, computational visual modelling and a computer-based detection experiment, the study published in PNAS reveals that, while glass frog translucency does act as camouflage, the mechanism differs from that of true transparency. Lead author, Dr James Barnett who began the research while a PhD student at the University of Bristol and is now based at McMaster University in Canada, said: “The frogs are always green but appear to brighten and darken depending on the background.

Life Sciences - 25.05.2020
7,000 years of demographic history in France
7,000 years of demographic history in France
A team led by scientists from the Institut Jacques Monod (CNRS/Université de Paris) 1 have shown that French prehistory was punctuated by two waves of migration: the first during the Neolithic period, about 6,300 years ago, the second during the Bronze Age, about 4,200 years ago.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.05.2020
Antibody designed to recognise pathogens of Alzheimer's disease
Antibody designed to recognise pathogens of Alzheimer’s disease
Researchers have found a way to design an antibody that can identify the toxic particles that destroy healthy brain cells - a potential advance in the fight against Alzheimer's disease.

History / Archeology - 25.05.2020
The Banner of Péronne - a political matter: Tenacious and clever
The Banner of Péronne - a political matter: Tenacious and clever
As journalists traditionally say: real-life stories are the best ones. In the case of Dr. Daniel Stracke, 46, an historian and research assistant, his real-life story presented itself in the corridor of the Institute of Comparative Urban History (Institut für vergleichende Städtegeschichte, IStG) at the University of Münster.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.05.2020
Problems with alcohol? 29 gene variants may explain why
A genome-wide analysis of more than 435,000 people has identified 29 genetic variants ed to problematic drinking, researchers at Yale University School of Medicine and colleagues report May 25 . " The new data triple the number of known genetic risk loci associated with problematic alcohol use," said Yale's Joel Gelernter , the Foundations Fund of Psychiatry and professor of genetics and of neuroscience, who is the senior author of the multi-institutional study.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.05.2020
Even natural products can be harmful for the unborn child
Plant products ingested by pregnant women through their diet are broken down by the intestinal microbiota into chemical substances, some of which can cross the placental barrier and reach the fetus. These foreign substances can harm the unborn child, even if they are of "natural origin". Researchers at the Department for BioMedical Research (DBMR) at the University of Bern and Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, therefore warn against underestimating the effects of such substances.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.05.2020
DNA damage and neurodegenerative diseases: a talk with Claudia Magrin and Martina Sola
Claudia Magrin and Martina Sola are two researchers in neuroscience and PhD students at USI. They both work at the Laboratory for biomedical neurosciences of the Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale, in the research group led by Dr. Paolo Paganetti. They are currently working on a study on the relationship between Tau and P53 proteins in response to DNA damage, published in Communications Biology, one of Nature's scientific journals.

Physics - Materials Science - 25.05.2020
Lossless conduction at the edges
Lossless conduction at the edges
Atomically thin layers of the semimetal tungsten ditelluride conduct electricity losslessly along narrow, one-dimensional channels at the crystal edges. The material is therefore a second-order topological insulator. By obtaining experimental proof of this behavior, physicists from the University of Basel have expanded the pool of candidate materials for topological superconductivity.

Health - 23.05.2020
BSMS researchers lead the way in international trial to protect healthcare workers from Covid-19
BSMS researchers lead the way in international trial to protect healthcare workers from Covid-19
Martin Llewelyn, Professor of Infectious Diseases at Brighton and Sussex Medical School ( BSMS ), is leading the UK arm of a global study, which is opening at hospital sites in Brighton and Oxford, to test if either chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine can prevent Covid-19 in vital frontline healthcare workers.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 22.05.2020
Cell reproduction dogma challenged
Cell reproduction dogma challenged
Meiosis is essential to sexual reproduction. For almost 15 years, it has been commonly held that retinoic acid, a molecule derived from vitamin A, triggers meiosis in mammalian germ cells. Yet, in joint articles published in Science Advances ( 22 May 2020 ), researchers from the Institut de Biologie Valrose (CNRS / INSERM / Université Côte d'Azur) and the IGBMC (CNRS / INSERM / University of Strasbourg), with their colleagues, demonstrate that meiosis in mice begins and proceeds normally even in the absence of retinoic acid.

Health - 22.05.2020
UofG contributes to largest cohort study to date on characterisation of COVID-19 hospital patients
The University of Glasgow is one of six universities to have contributed to the largest cohort study to date on the detailed characterisation of hospital COVID-19 patients in the world. The new study - published today in The BMJ and led by the University of Liverpool, University of Edinburgh and Imperial College London - revealed age, male sex, obesity, and underlying illness have emerged as risk factors for severe COVID-19 or death in the UK.

History / Archeology - 22.05.2020
Opinion: Historical films may be decaying much faster than we thought
Writing for The Conversation, PhD student Ida R. Ahmad (UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage) explains that precious historical documents are under threat from 'vinegar syndrome', which causes film to decompose. A significant chunk of the world's history is facing an existential threat.  US government deeds ,  recordings of Indigenous Australians  and  photographs of English seaside life spanning three decades  are just some of the historical documents recorded on acetate film that are suffering irreversible damage due to what's known as vinegar syndrome.

Health - Computer Science - 22.05.2020
New contact tracing app for COVID-19 spread designed to protect privacy
A new app developed at Imperial College London aims to protect privacy whilst trying to minimise coronavirus spread. As part of their efforts to slow the outbreak of coronavirus , international governments, research institutions and industry are developing contact tracing apps to record interactions between people.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2020
SARS-CoV-2 mutations do not appear to increase transmissibility
None of the mutations currently documented in the SARS-CoV-2 virus appear to increase its transmissibility, according to a UCL-led study. The analysis of virus genomes from over 15,000 Covid-19 patients from 75 countries is published today as a pre-print on bioRxiv and has not yet been peer-reviewed.

Health - Social Sciences - 22.05.2020
Children appear half as likely to catch COVID-19 as adults
Children and young people appear to be more than 50% less likely to catch SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, than adults but evidence remains weak on how likely they are to transmit the virus, finds a UCL-led review of test and tracing and population screening studies. Researchers say the findings, which are awaiting peer review and formal publication, provide further evidence on children's susceptibility to COVID-19, and the data will be important for governments making decisions about school reopening and easing lockdown restrictions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.05.2020
First evidence of microplastics passing from insects to predators in rivers
First evidence of microplastics passing from insects to predators in rivers
A species of river bird is swallowing hundreds of plastic fibres every day via their insect prey, research by Cardiff University and the Greenpeace Research Laboratories at the University of Exeter has shown. Dippers are also inadvertently feeding thousands of plastic fibres contained in insects to their nest-bound chicks during their development.

Health - 22.05.2020
Mental health issues ’substantial health concern’ among police internationally
Mental health issues are a "substantial health concern" among police officers, with around one in four potentially drinking at hazardous levels, and around one in 10 meeting the criteria for anxiety disorder and suicidal thoughts, finds a UCL-led study. The pooled data analysis of available international evidence, published online today in Occupational & Environmental Medicine , also found that one in seven officers meet criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.
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