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Materials Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 29.07.2019
Digitizing and replicating the world of materials
A team of EPFL researchers has set itself the lofty goal of building the biggest-ever database that digitizes the visual appearance of all natural and synthetic materials in the world.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 25.07.2019
UChicago jumpstarts collaborations with national labs in AI, quantum
The University of Chicago is seeding promising projects with Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the emerging fields of artificial intelligence and quantum science. The projects will tackle big questions in neuroscience, climate science, cosmological physics and quantum networking.

Computer Science / Telecom - Administration - 23.07.2019
Anonymising personal data 'not enough to protect privacy', shows new study
Anonymising personal data ’not enough to protect privacy’, shows new study
Current methods for anonymising data leave individuals at risk of being re-identified, according to new UCLouvain and Imperial research. Companies and governments downplay the risk of re-identification by arguing that the datasets they sell are always incomplete. Our findings show this might not help.

Computer Science / Telecom - Materials Science - 19.07.2019
AI Advances 3D Printing With Soft Materials
Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, is a burgeoning technology increasingly being leveraged in the biomedical space. And it's not just for devices - 3D printing is being used increasingly to print organic tissues and soft materials, such as elastomers. While 3D printing soft materials, such as with silicone or proteins, offers many distinct advantages, it introduces many complicated variables to consider when creating new parts or materials.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.07.2019
Research Identifies New Pathways for Sensory Learning in the Brain
Automated, robotic training device developed by Carnegie Mellon undergraduate student advances neuroscience research We've all heard the saying that individuals learn at their own pace. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an automated, robotic training device that allows mice to learn at their leisure.

Environment - Computer Science / Telecom - 16.07.2019
Tracking down climate change with radar eyes
Tracking down climate change with radar eyes
"The Arctic is a hotspot of climate change," explains Prof. Florian Seitz of the German Geodetic Research Institute at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). "Due to rising temperatures, the glaciers of Greenland are receding. At the same time sea ice is melting. Every year, billions of liters of meltwater are released into the ocean." The enormous volumes of fresh water released in the Arctic not only raise the sea level, they also have the potential to change the system of global ocean currents - and thus, our climate.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 12.07.2019
The way a single neuron processes information is never the same
The way a single neuron processes information is never the same
How do neurons process information? Neurons are known to break down an incoming electrical signal into sub-units. Now, researchers at Blue Brain have discovered that dendrites, the neuron's tree-like receptors, work together - dynamically and depending on the workload - for learning. The findings further our understanding of how we think and may inspire new algorithms for artificial intelligence.

Computer Science / Telecom - 05.07.2019
New App Aims to Teach Special Relativity Hands-On
Many people have at least heard of Albert Einstein's famous theory of special relativity, or its key formula E=mc2. Understanding that theory and how it affects the complex relationship between space and time in the universe is another matter entirely. Carnegie Mellon University Professor of Physics Ira Rothstein hopes to make understanding general relativity a little easier with a new smartphone app that lets anyone experiment with and learn how different aspects of special relativity, like time dilatio and length contraction, work.

Computer Science / Telecom - Materials Science - 03.07.2019
With Little Training, Machine-Learning Algorithms Can Uncover Hidden Scientific Knowledge
With Little Training, Machine-Learning Algorithms Can Uncover Hidden Scientific Knowledge
Sure, computers can be used to play grandmaster-level chess , but can they make scientific discoveries' Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have shown that an algorithm with no training in materials science can scan the text of millions of papers and uncover new scientific knowledge.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 02.07.2019
Generation and sampling of quantum states of light in a silicon chip
Generation and sampling of quantum states of light in a silicon chip
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Technical University of Denmark have found a promising new way to build the next generation of quantum simulators combining light and silicon micro-chips. In the roadmap to develop quantum machines able to compete and overcome classical supercomputers in solving specific problems, the scientific community is facing two main technological challenges.

Computer Science / Telecom - Social Sciences - 28.06.2019
What can Wikipedia tell us about human interaction?
What can Wikipedia tell us about human interaction?
EPFL researchers have studied the dynamics of network structures using one of the world's most-visited websites: Wikipedia. In addition to a better understanding of online networks, their work brings exciting insights into human social behavior and collective memory. Have you ever visited a Wikipedia page to answer a question, only to find yourself clicking from page to page, until you end up on a topic wildly different from the one you started with?

Computer Science / Telecom - Microtechnics - 24.06.2019
Teaching robots what humans want
Told to optimize for speed while racing down a track in a computer game, a car pushes the pedal to the metal... and proceeds to spin in a tight little circle. Nothing in the instructions told the car to drive straight, and so it improvised. Researchers are trying to make it easier for humans to tell autonomous systems, such as vehicles and robots, what they want them to do.

Computer Science / Telecom - 20.06.2019
Online Atlas of Aquatic Insects Aids Water-Quality Monitoring
Computer vision researchers have demonstrated they can use special light sources and sensors to see around corners or through gauzy filters, enabling them to reconstruct the shapes of unseen objects. The researchers from Carnegie Mellon University , the University of Toronto and University College London said this technique enables them to reconstruct images in great detail, including the relief of George Washington's profile on a U.S. quarter.

Computer Science / Telecom - 19.06.2019
Around Corners To Detect Object Shapes
Computer vision researchers have demonstrated they can use special light sources and sensors to see around corners or through gauzy filters, enabling them to reconstruct the shapes of unseen objects. The researchers from Carnegie Mellon University , the University of Toronto and University College London said this technique enables them to reconstruct images in great detail, including the relief of George Washington's profile on a U.S. quarter.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 19.06.2019
'Alexa, monitor my heart': Researchers develop first contactless cardiac arrest AI system for smart speakers
’Alexa, monitor my heart’: Researchers develop first contactless cardiac arrest AI system for smart speakers
Almost 500,000 Americans die each year from cardiac arrest , when the heart suddenly stops beating. People experiencing cardiac arrest will suddenly become unresponsive and either stop breathing or gasp for air, a sign known as agonal breathing. Immediate CPR can double or triple someone's chance of survival, but that requires a bystander to be present.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 19.06.2019
A tool for identifying phases of matter
Even if you're not a physicist, phases of matter... really matter. They're the distinct physical forms taken on by all the "stuff" in the universe, from icebergs to ozone, and now Yale scientists have developed a more accurate way to help classify some of them. The findings appear in a recent study published in the journal Physical Review Letters and a follow-up work published in Physical Review B. The fundamental phases of matter - solid, liquid, and gas - are well known.

Computer Science / Telecom - 18.06.2019
Researchers use facial quirks to unmask ’deepfakes’
After watching hours of video footage of former President Barack Obama delivering his weekly address, Shruti Agarwal began to notice a few quirks about the way Obama speaks. "Every time he says 'Hi, everybody,' he moves his head up to the left or the right, and then he purses his lips," said Agarwal, a computer science graduate student at UC Berkeley.

Computer Science / Telecom - 17.06.2019
Spotting fake videos with artificial intelligence
Spotting fake videos with artificial intelligence
Last year a video clip featuring Barack Obama created quite a stir. It seemed to show the ex-president calling his successor Donald Trump "a total and complete dipshit". Ultimately, the people behind the clip admitted that it was no more than a highly convincing fake. It is now possible to perform this kind of trickery even in real time.

Computer Science / Telecom - 10.06.2019
Do Video Games Drive Obesity?
Are children, teenagers and adults who spend a lot of time playing video games really more obese? A meta study conducted with the University of Würzburg has looked into this question. The cliché is true - but only for adults. A chubby teen lolling on the sofa for hours on end, the game controller in one hand, a bag of crisps at his side and a bottle of coke on the coffee table.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 07.06.2019
AI tool helps radiologists detect brain aneurysms
Radiologists improved their diagnoses of brain aneurysms with the help of an artificial intelligence algorithm developed by medical experts and computer scientists. Doctors could soon get some help from an artificial intelligence tool when diagnosing brain aneurysms - bulges in blood vessels in the brain that can leak or burst open, potentially leading to stroke, brain damage or death.

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