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Results 61 - 80 of 711.


Computer Science / Telecom - Innovation / Technology - 18.01.2019
Savvy Use of Data, Technology Tells the Planet’s Story
The story of EarthTime begins on Mars. EarthTime today is a technological platform that helps people comprehend massive amounts of data about our planet and come to grips with our biggest global challenges. But 15 years ago, people just wanted to see what the Red Planet looked like. When NASA's Spirit and Opportunity rovers landed on Mars in 2004, they began sending back mesmerizing photos of the bleak landscape.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 16.01.2019
Researchers are using a data-driven approach to make earthquakes less damaging
Researchers are using a data-driven approach to make earthquakes less damaging
Technologies like artificial intelligence, sensor networks and advances in mapping are driving the work Amy Akmal The 1994 Northridge earthquake was one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history. Fifty-seven people died, more than 8,700 were injured, and property damages amounted to billions of dollars.

Computer Science / Telecom - Mathematics - 15.01.2019
Democratizing data science
Democratizing data science
Tool for nonstatisticians automatically generates models that glean insights from complex datasets. MIT researchers are hoping to advance the democratization of data science with a new tool for nonstatisticians that automatically generates models for analyzing raw data. Democratizing data science is the notion that anyone, with little to no expertise, can do data science if provided ample data and user-friendly analytics tools.

Computer Science / Telecom - 08.01.2019
Imperial experts create robot helper to understand and respond to human movement
Researchers at Imperial have created a new robot controller using game theory, allowing the robot to learn when to assist a human. The past decade has seen robots work increasingly with humans - for example in manufacturing, assistive devices for physically impaired individuals, and in surgery. However, robots cannot currently react in a personalised way to individual users, which limits their usefulness to humans.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 07.01.2019
Can artificial intelligence tell a polar bear from a can opener?
Can artificial intelligence tell a polar bear from a can opener?
Science + Technology UCLA psychologists' experiments demonstrate severe limitations of 'deep learning' machines Stuart Wolpert How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? They have improved greatly in recent years, but still have a long way to go, a team of UCLA cognitive psychologists reports in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 03.01.2019
Q&A: Creating a
Q&A: Creating a "Virtual Seismologist"
Understanding earthquakes is a challenging problem-not only because they are potentially dangerous but also because they are complicated phenomena that are difficult to study.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 03.01.2019
When medicine and computer science join forces
When medicine and computer science join forces
Dissertation prize for physician Dr. med. Robert Seifert, whose MD thesis is based on interdisciplinary collaboration supported by the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence. Medicine and Computer Science are two disciplines that many people would not automatically associate with each other. For Dr. Robert Seifert, however, they are, as he puts it, "a perfectly normal combination" and closely interlinked.

Computer Science / Telecom - Mathematics - 02.01.2019
Customizing computer-aided design
Customizing computer-aided design
System breaks down complex designs into easily modifiable shapes for custom manufacturing and 3-D printing. MIT researchers have devised a technique that "reverse engineers" complex 3-D computer-aided design (CAD) models, making them far easier for users to customize for manufacturing and 3-D printing applications.

Pharmacology - Computer Science / Telecom - 20.12.2018
Concerns raised as opioid prescriptions rise across UK
Researchers recommend greater action to promote best practice as a new study reveals a rise in prescriptions of opioids for treating chronic pain rise between 1998 and 2018. A review of opioid prescribing in the UK has shown that UK doctors are prescribing more and stronger opioid drugs to patients.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 20.12.2018
CDC Says Carnegie Mellon’s Flu Forecasts Once Again Most Accurate
CMU's epidemiological forecasting systems get top marks four years in a row The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced that Carnegie Mellon University's forecasts of national and regional influenza activity during the 2017-2018 flu season were the most accurate of the 30 systems in its flu forecasting initiative.

Computer Science / Telecom - Environment - 20.12.2018
Loss of intertidal ecosystem exposes coastal communities
Loss of intertidal ecosystem exposes coastal communities
Artificial intelligence and extensive satellite imagery have allowed researchers to map the world's intertidal zones for the first time, revealing a significant loss of the crucial ecosystem. The University of Queensland and University of New South Wales study has shown that global foreshore environments declined by up to 16 per cent between 1984 and 2016.

Computer Science / Telecom - Microtechnics - 19.12.2018
Self-driving rovers tested in Mars-like Morocco
Self-driving rovers tested in Mars-like Morocco
Robots invaded the Sahara Desert for Europe's largest rover field test, taking place in a Mars-like part of Morocco. For two weeks three rovers and more than 40 engineers performed testing of automated navigation systems at up to five different sites. This marked the end of the first phase of the strategic research cluster on space robotics technologies, a scheme funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 programme.

Computer Science / Telecom - Microtechnics - 19.12.2018
Self-driving rovers field tested in Mars-like Morocco
Self-driving rovers field tested in Mars-like Morocco
Robots invaded the Sahara Desert for Europe's largest rover field test, taking place in a Mars-like part of Morocco. For two weeks three rovers and more than 40 engineers performed testing of automated navigation systems at up to five different sites. This marked the end of the first phase of the strategic research cluster on space robotics technologies, a scheme funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 programme.

Environment - Computer Science / Telecom - 19.12.2018
Inventory indicates who goes solar and why
Stanford researchers have identified the GPS locations and sizes of almost all U.S. solar power installations from a billion images. Using the data, which are public, they identified factors that promote the use of solar energy and those that discourage it. Knowing which Americans have installed solar panels on their roofs and why they did so would be enormously useful for managing the changing U.S. electricity system and to understanding the barriers to greater use of renewable resources.

Innovation / Technology - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.12.2018
RFID Tag Arrays Track Body Movements, Shape Changes
Washable, battery-free tags could be cheaply embedded in clothing Carnegie Mellon University researchers have found ways to track body movements and detect shape changes using arrays of RFID tags. RFID-embedded clothing thus could be used to control avatars in video games - much like in the movie "Ready Player One." Or embedded clothing could to tell you when you should sit up straight - much like your mother.

Computer Science / Telecom - 17.12.2018
Machine learning-detected signal predicts time to earthquake
Machine learning-detected signal predicts time to earthquake
Researchers applied machine learning to analyze Cascadia data and discovered the megathrust broadcasts a constant tremor, a fingerprint of the fault's displacement. Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers applied machine-learning expertise to predict quakes along Cascadia, a 700-mile-long fault from northern California to southern British Columbia that flanks cities such as Seattle.

Computer Science / Telecom - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
New AI system developed at UCLA, Stanford mimics how humans visualize and identify objects
New AI system developed at UCLA, Stanford mimics how humans visualize and identify objects
UCLA and Stanford University engineers have demonstrated a computer system that can discover and identify the real-world objects it “sees” based on the same method of visual learning that humans use. The system is an advance in a type of technology called “computer vision,” which enables computers to read and identify visual images.

Computer Science / Telecom - 17.12.2018
Artificial intelligence for better computer graphics
Artificial intelligence for better computer graphics
[ Florian Aigner At the TU Wien (Vienna), neural networks have been developed which make it much easier to create photorealistic pictures of a wide variety of materials. If computer-generated images are to look realistic, different materials have to be presented differently: The metallic sheen of a coin looks quite different from the dull gloss of a wooden plate or the slightly transparent skin of a grape.

Computer Science / Telecom - Business / Economics - 14.12.2018
Cryptocurrency manipulation schemes could be found and foiled by new algorithm
Imperial scientists have created an algorithm to predict when specific cryptocoins are at risk of 'pump-and-dump' schemes. The algorithm could help market regulators predict and prevent cryptocurrency schemes that sees traders spend seven million US Dollars per month, only to find the price of their purchased currency falls as the scheme unfolds.

Computer Science / Telecom - 07.12.2018
The privacy risks of compiling mobility data
The privacy risks of compiling mobility data
Merging different types of location-stamped data can make it easier to discern users' identities, even when the data is anonymized. A new study by MIT researchers finds that the growing practice of compiling massive, anonymized datasets about people's movement patterns is a double-edged sword: While it can provide deep insights into human behavior for research, it could also put people's private data at risk.