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Computer Science / Telecom - 18.02.2011
Findings of Trash Track project revealed
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. In August 2009, a team of researchers from the Senseable City Lab in the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning embarked on a major project to track the journey of 3,000 items of waste as they moved through Seattle's disposal system. The goal of the project, called Trash Track, was to monitor the patterns and costs of urban disposal and to help create awareness of the impact of trash on the environment.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.02.2011
Discovery of New Planet Reveals Distant Solar System to Riva
With the discovery of an eighth planet, the Kepler-90 system is the first to tie with our solar system in number of planets. NASA/Ames Research Center/Wendy Stenzel AUSTIN, Texas - The discovery of an eighth planet circling the distant star Kepler-90 by University of Texas at Austin astronomer Andrew Vanderburg and Google's Christopher Shallue overturns our solar system's status as having the highest number of known planets.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.02.2011
Discovery of New Planet Reveals Distant Solar System to Riva
With the discovery of an eighth planet, the Kepler-90 system is the first to tie with our solar system in number of planets. NASA/Ames Research Center/Wendy Stenzel AUSTIN, Texas - The discovery of an eighth planet circling the distant star Kepler-90 by University of Texas at Austin astronomer Andrew Vanderburg and Google's Christopher Shallue overturns our solar system's status as having the highest number of known planets.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.02.2011
Using AI to Discover New Worlds
With the discovery of an eighth planet, the Kepler-90 system is the first to tie with our solar system in number of planets. NASA/Ames Research Center/Wendy Stenzel AUSTIN, Texas - The discovery of an eighth planet circling the distant star Kepler-90 by University of Texas at Austin astronomer Andrew Vanderburg and Google's Christopher Shallue overturns our solar system's status as having the highest number of known planets.

Computer Science / Telecom - Linguistics / Literature - 10.02.2011
What determines the length of words?
Why are some words short and others long? For decades, a prominent theory has held that words used frequently are short in order to make language efficient: It would not be economical if 'the' were as long as ‘phenomenology,' in this view. But now a team of MIT cognitive scientists has developed an alternative notion, on the basis of new research: A word's length reflects the amount of information it contains.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 26.01.2011
An Astronomer's Field of Dreams
An Astronomer’s Field of Dreams
An innovative new radio telescope array under construction in central New Mexico will eventually harness the power of more than 13,000 antennas and provide a fresh eye to the sky. The antennas, which resemble droopy ceiling fans, form the Long Wavelength Array, designed to survey the sky from horizon to horizon over a wide range of frequencies.

Mathematics - Computer Science / Telecom - 03.01.2011
Mathematical model shows how groups split into factions
Mathematical model shows how groups split into factions
The school dance committee is split; one group wants an "Alice in Wonderland" theme; the other insists on "Vampire Jamboree." Mathematics could have predicted it. Social scientists have long argued that when under stress, social networks either end up all agreeing or splitting into two opposing factions.

Computer Science / Telecom - Business / Economics - 20.12.2010
Analysis of phone calls shows how political boundaries could be ideally drawn
Analysis of phone calls shows how political boundaries could be ideally drawn
In an ideal world, political boundaries would enclose groups of people who are connected to each other more than they are connected to outsiders. A new study using a computer algorithm developed at Cornell shows that Great Britain is - almost - already organized that way. Analyzing a database of British telephone calls, which they call "the largest non-Internet human network," researchers at Cornell, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and in the United Kingdom found that connections coincided remarkably well with administrative boundaries.

Computer Science / Telecom - Life Sciences - 16.12.2010
FReD helps explain how a bee sees
FReD helps explain how a bee sees
FReD helps explain how a bee sees Researchers have developed a database that shows how colours appear to bees - News Adapted from a news release issued by Queen Mary, University of London Thursday 16 December 2010 Bees can see colours but they perceive the world differently to us, including variations in hue that we cannot distinguish with the naked eye.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 08.12.2010
Redrawing the map of Great Britain based on human interaction
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. A group of researchers at MIT, Cornell University and University College London have used one of the world's largest databases of telecommunications records to redraw the map of Great Britain. The research, which will be published in the journal PLoS ONE on Dec. 8, is based on the analysis of 12 billion anonymized records representing more than 95 percent of Great Britain's residential and business landlines.

Computer Science / Telecom - Mathematics - 08.12.2010
Geotagging reveals not only where you are, but also people you might know
Geotagging reveals not only where you are, but also people you might know
If you see Fred and Susie standing in the same line at the cafeteria just once, it probably doesn't mean anything. If they show up together in many different places, it starts to mean a lot. But how many times do you have to see them together before it becomes significant? Surprisingly few, say Cornell computer scientists.

Environment - Computer Science / Telecom - 23.11.2010
Midwest farm drainage systems partly to blame for Gulf of Mexico dead zones
Midwest farm drainage systems partly to blame for Gulf of Mexico dead zones
The tile drainage systems in upper Mississippi farmlands - from southwest Minnesota to across Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio - are the biggest contributors of nitrogen runoff into the Gulf of Mexico, reports a Cornell/University of Illinois-Urbana study. Nitrogen runoff has been identified as a major contributor to dead zones in the Gulf, where nitrogen fertilizes algae and causes it to bloom, which in turn, depletes oxygen from the water and suffocates other life forms over thousands of square miles each summer.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 17.11.2010
Caltech Physicists Demonstrate a Four-Fold Quantum Memory
Caltech Physicists Demonstrate a Four-Fold Quantum Memory
PASADENA, Calif. — Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have demonstrated quantum entanglement for a quantum state stored in four spatially distinct atomic memories. Their work, described in the November 18 issue of the journal Nature, also demonstrated a quantum interface between the atomic memories—which represent something akin to a computer "hard drive" for entanglement—and four beams of light, thereby enabling the four-fold entanglement to be distributed by photons across quantum networks.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 17.11.2010
Speech monitoring could track Parkinson s
Speech monitoring could track Parkinson s
Science | Health 17 Nov 10 The severity of Parkinson's disease symptoms could be accurately monitored remotely through analysing a patient's speech patterns, a new study suggests. The research, by scientists from Oxford University and Denver, Colorado, examined almost 6,000 speech recordings from 42 people with Parkinson's.

Computer Science / Telecom - Electroengineering - 15.11.2010
‘Space-time cloak’ to conceal events revealed in new study
‘Space-time cloak’ to conceal events revealed in new study
‘Space-time cloak' to conceal events revealed in new study Cloak allows objects to move undetected, according to a paper in the Journal of Optics - News release Scientists have developed a recipe for manipulating the speed of light as it passes over an object, making it theoretically possible to ‘cloak‘ the object's movement so that an observer doesn't notice, according to a paper in the Journal of Optics .

Computer Science / Telecom - Linguistics / Literature - 20.10.2010
New search method tracks down influential ideas
New search method tracks down influential ideas
Princeton computer scientists have developed a new way of tracing the origins and spread of ideas, a technique that could make it easier to gauge the influence of notable scholarly papers, buzz-generating news stories and other information sources. The method relies on computer algorithms to analyze how language morphs over time within a group of documents - whether they are research papers on quantum physics or blog posts about politics - and to determine which documents were the most influential.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 16.09.2010
Optical chip enables new approach to quantum computing
Optical chip enables new approach to quantum computing
An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bristol has developed a new approach to quantum computing that could soon be used to perform complex calculations that cannot be done by today's computers Scientists from Bristol's Centre for Quantum Photonics have developed a silicon chip that could be used to perform complex calculations and simulations using quantum particles in the near future.

Computer Science / Telecom - Mathematics - 14.09.2010
Researchers improve wireless location-detection systems
Researchers improve wireless location-detection systems
In a pair of papers appearing in October in the journal IEEE Transactions on Information Theory , MIT researchers present a new theory that establishes fundamental limits on the accuracy of wireless location detection. By demonstrating which aspects of wireless signals convey the most reliable location information, the work points the way toward better location-detection algorithms.

Mathematics - Computer Science / Telecom - 10.09.2010
Neurons: Faster than thought and able to multiply
Scientists discover new properties of nerve cells through computing - and contemplation Freiburg, 10.09.2010 Using computer simulations of brain-like networks, researchers from Germany and Japan have discovered why nerve cells transmit information through small electrical pulses. Not only allows this the brain to process information much faster than previously thought: single neurons are already able to multiply, opening the door to more complex forms of computing.

Computer Science / Telecom - Mathematics - 05.08.2010
Shape-shifting robots
Shape-shifting robots
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. By combining origami and electrical engineering, researchers at MIT and Harvard are working to develop the ultimate reconfigurable robot - one that can turn into absolutely anything. The researchers have developed algorithms that, given a three-dimensional shape, can determine how to reproduce it by folding a sheet of semi-rigid material with a distinctive pattern of flexible creases.
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