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Earth Sciences - Physics - 07.03.2010
Dinosaurs went out with a bang, says study
Dinosaurs went out with a bang, says study
The dinosaurs died out as a result of a huge asteroid strike rather than the eruption of a super volcano, according to a study published today in the journal Science . Dr Paul Bown (UCL Earth Sciences) was part of a panel of researchers who analysed more than two decades? worth of evidence to determine the cause of the Cretaceous?Tertiary (KT) mass extinction.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 05.03.2010
The ever-changing Earth
Researchers at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at Vienna University of Technology (TU) are investigating the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field. The Earth's atmosphere is not only essential to support human life on Earth; it also affects our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 05.03.2010
The ever-changing Earth
Researchers at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at Vienna University of Technology (TU) are investigating the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field. The Earth's atmosphere is not only essential to support human life on Earth; it also affects our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field.

Earth Sciences - Veterinary - 04.03.2010
New Evidence Hints at Global Glaciation 716.5 Million Years Ago
Cambridge, Mass. March 4, 2010 - Geologists have found evidence that sea ice extended to the equator 716.5 million years ago, bringing new precision to a “snowball Earth” event long suspected to have taken place around that time. Led by scientists at Harvard University, the team reports on its work this week in the journal Science.

Earth Sciences - 11.02.2010
Strongest evidence to date links exploration well to Lusi mud volcano
Strongest evidence to date links exploration well to Lusi mud volcano
BERKELEY — New data provide the strongest evidence to date that the world’s biggest mud volcano, which killed 13 people in 2006 and so far has displaced 30,000 people in East Java, Indonesia, was not caused by an earthquake, according to an international scientific team that includes researchers from Durham University and the University of California, Berkeley.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 10.02.2010
Researchers reveal polycentric London
Researchers reveal polycentric London
Professor Michael Batty (UCL Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis) and Dr Soong Kang (UCL Management Science and Innovation) applied the techniques of statistical physics to their mountain of raw data. The pair joined forces with a computational social scientist and a physicist, both based in Paris, to explore patterns of commuting by tube into central London.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 03.02.2010
Fossils show earliest animal trails
Trails found in rocks dating back 565 million years are thought to be the earliest evidence of animal locomotion ever found. The newly-discovered fossils, from rocks in Newfoundland in Canada, were analysed by an international team led by Oxford University scientists. They identified over 70 fossilised trails indicating that some ancient creatures moved, in a similar way to modern sea anemones, across the seafloors of the Ediacaran Period.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 02.02.2010
Satellite Observations Help Assess Future Earthquake Risk in Haiti
February 03, 2010 — Viginia Key — Scientists at the University of Miami have analyzed images based on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations taken before and just after Haiti's earthquake, on January 12. The images reveal surprising new details. The images were obtained using data from Japan's ALOS satellite and made available to the scientific community through the efforts of GEO, the Group of Earth Observation, an umbrella group of many countries that promotes the exchange of satellite data to efficiently observe our planet, and the European Space Agency (ESA).

Earth Sciences - Environment - 13.01.2010
Heat and moisture from Himalayas could be a key cause of the South Asian monsoon
Cambridge, Mass. January 13, 2010 - Harvard climate scientists suggest that the Tibetan Plateau—thought to be the primary source of heat that drives the South Asian monsoon—may have far less of an effect than the Himalayas and other surrounding mountains. As the monsoon brings needed rainfall and water to billions of people each year, understanding its proper origin, especially in the context of global climate change, is crucial for the future sustainability of the region.

Health - Earth Sciences - 08.01.2010
Human Ancestor ‘Lucy’ Was a Tree Climber, New Evidence
AUSTIN, Texas - Evidence preserved in the internal skeletal structure of the world-famous fossil, Lucy, suggests the ancient human species frequently climbed trees, according to a new analysis by scientists from The Johns Hopkins University and The University of Texas at Austin.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 03.01.2010
Spectacular Mars images reveal evidence of ancient lakes
Spectacular Mars images reveal evidence of ancient lakes
Spectacular satellite images suggest that Mars was warm enough to sustain lakes 3 billion years ago, a period that was previously thought to be too cold and arid to sustain water on the surface, according to research published today in Geology . The research, by a team from Imperial College London and UCL, suggests that during the Hesperian Epoch, approximately 3 billion years ago, Mars had lakes made of melted ice, each around 20km wide, along parts of the equator.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 17.12.2009
Astronomers find world with inhospitable atmosphere
Astronomers find world with inhospitable atmosphere
Astronomers have discovered the second super-Earth exoplanet for which they have determined the mass and radius, giving vital clues about its structure.

Earth Sciences - 15.11.2009
Scientists shed new light on seafloor growth
A University of Plymouth-led team of international scientists has pioneered a novel geological technique and used it to shed new light on how the oceans form during ‘seafloor spreading’, the process that constantly ‘re-paves’ the crust of the Earth’s seas. This new approach was developed following a multi-million dollar Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition to the mid-Atlantic ridge in the heart of the Atlantic Ocean, on board the research ship the JOIDES Resolution.

Earth Sciences - 05.11.2009
New Study in 'Geology' Identifies Active Magma Systems in East Africa
New Study in ‘Geology’ Identifies Active Magma Systems in East Africa
November 06, 2009 — A team from the University of Miami, University of El Paso and University of Rochester have employed Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) images compiled over a decade to study volcanic activity in the African Rift. The study, published in the November issue of Geology , studies the section of the rift in Kenya.

Earth Sciences - Linguistics / Literature - 30.10.2009
New analyses of dinosaur growth may wipe out one-third of species
New analyses of dinosaur growth may wipe out one-third of species
BERKELEY — Paleontologists from the University of California, Berkeley, and the Museum of the Rockies have wiped out two species of dome-headed dinosaur, one of them named three years ago – with great fanfare – after Hogwarts, the school attended by Harry Potter. Dracorex (upper left) and Stygimoloch (upper right) are not distinct dome-headed dinosaurs, but young and nearly sexually mature, respectively, members of the species Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis , according to a new study by paleontologists from UC Berkeley and the Museum of the Rockies.

Earth Sciences - 04.10.2009
Archaeologist at University finds 'Bluestonehenge' site
An archaeologist from the University of Sheffield has discovered a lost stone circle just a mile away from Britain's famous circle of standing stones at Stonehenge. The exciting new find on the west bank of the River Avon, has been dubbed "Bluestonehenge", after the colour of the 25 Welsh stones of which it was once made up.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 01.10.2009
Oldest hominid skeleton provides new evidence for human evolution
Oldest hominid skeleton provides new evidence for human evolution
The discovery reveals the biology of the first stage of human evolution better than anything seen to date. Los Alamos geologist is codirector of international discovery team Partial skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus, a hominid species living about 4.4 million years ago in Ethiopia. This female stood about 1.2 meters high.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 21.06.2009
Paper in Journal of Zoology: From Jack The Ripper To Great Whites
Paper in Journal of Zoology: From Jack The Ripper To Great Whites
June 22, 2009 — Virginia Key — Predation is one of the most fundamental and fascinating interactions in nature, and sharks are some of the fiercest predators on Earth. However, their hunting pattern is difficult to study because it is rarely observed in the wild. As a result, shark predatory behavior has remained much of a mystery.

Earth Sciences - 21.05.2009
University researcher swaps Sheffield for storm chasing
A researcher from the University of Sheffield is contributing to the world´s largest project to explore the origins and impact of one of the most deadly forms of extreme weather - the tornado. Jacqui Wilmshurst, a PhD student from the University of Sheffield´s Department of Psychology, is part of a team of researchers working on the Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornados Experiment 2 (VORTEX2) which is tracking tornados in the USA to understand more about their origins and the effects they have on the communities which are at risk of being devastated by them.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.05.2009
Summer haze has a cooling effect in southeastern United States, says new study
Summer haze has a cooling effect in southeastern United States, says new study
BERKELEY — Global warming may include some periods of local cooling, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. Results from satellite and ground-based sensor data show that sweltering summers can, paradoxically, lead to the temporary formation of a cooling haze in the southeastern United States.
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