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Education/Continuing Education - Chemistry
17.07.2017
New Vehicle Emissions Deceptively Clean
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have found that newer gasoline vehicles emit less particulate matter, but vapors in the "cleaner" exhaust form particulate matter long after exiting the tailpipe. These secondary particles, can be just as harmful to human health. Mechanical Engineering Professor Allen Robinson and his research team investigated the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the effects that more stringent vehicle standards could have on SOA formation.
Education/Continuing Education
10.05.2017
Oldest buckthorn fossilized flowers found in Argentina
Around 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, a giant asteroid crashed into the present-day Gulf of Mexico, leading to the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs. How plants were affected is less understood, but fossil records show that ferns were the first plants to recover many thousands of years afterward.
Education/Continuing Education - Life Sciences
27.04.2017
How Plants Form Their Sugar Transport Routes
How Plants Form Their Sugar Transport Routes
In experiments on transport tissues in plants, researchers from Heidelberg University were able to identify factors of crucial importance for the formation of the plant tissue known as phloem. According to Thomas Greb of the Centre for Organismal Studies (COS), these factors differ from all previously known factors that trigger the specification of cells.
Education/Continuing Education
24.02.2017
New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds
Origami-inspired materials use folds in materials to embed powerful functionality. However, all that folding can be pretty labor intensive. Now, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are drawing material inspiration from another ancient Japanese paper craft - kirigami.
Astronomy - Education/Continuing Education
09.01.2017
Spontaneous ‘dust traps': the missing link in planet formation discovered
Spontaneous ‘dust traps’: the missing link in planet formation discovered
Formation mechanism of spontaneous dust traps(red) in a protoplanetary disk after the formation of a spontaneous dust trap, visible as a bright dust ring. One of the major questions in astronomy today is how do planets form? Until recently, no theory has been able to provide a complete answer.
Astronomy - Education/Continuing Education
07.11.2016
The birth of massive stars is accompanied by strong luminosity bursts
The birth of massive stars is accompanied by strong luminosity bursts
Astronomers of the Universities of Tübingen and Vienna are investigating the basic principles of the formation of stars "How do massive stars form?" is one of the fundamental questions in modern astrophysics, because these massive stars govern the energy budget of their host galaxies.
Astronomy - Education/Continuing Education
27.10.2016
How planets like Jupiter form
How planets like Jupiter form
Young giant planets are born from gas and dust. Researchers of ETH Zürich and the Universities of Zürich and Bern simulated different scenarios relying on the computing power of the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) to find out how they exactly form and evolve. Astronomers set up two theories explaining how gaseous giant planets like Jupiter or Saturn could be born.
Astronomy - Education/Continuing Education
24.10.2016
Preferentially Earth-sized planets with lots of water
Preferentially Earth-sized planets with lots of water
Computer simulations by astrophysicists at the University of Bern of the formation of planets orbiting in the habitable zone of low mass stars such as Proxima Centauri show that these planets are most likely to be roughly the size of the Earth and to contain large amounts of water.
Education/Continuing Education
16.08.2016
Birds fly faster in large flocks
Birds fly faster in large flocks
Researchers at the Faculty of Science in Lund show that birds fly faster in flocks. The picture shows Terns photographed on Öland. Photo: Anders Hedenström New research at Lund University in Sweden shows that the flight speed of birds is determined by a variety of factors. Among the most sensational is that the size of the flock has a significant impact on how fast the birds can fly.
Education/Continuing Education
21.06.2016
Scientists calculate the fate of the Greenland meltwater
Scientists calculate the fate of the Greenland meltwater
Scientists have been able to track the flow of water created by Greenland's melting glaciers, revealing that it's currently having a less significant impact on the Gulf Stream than previously thought. New model calculations, conducted by an international research team from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research based in Germany and the University of Bristol in the UK, suggest that a large fraction of the meltwater is effectively removed from the most sensitive areas by swift, narrow boundary currents, delaying the influence on the Gulf Stream.
Chemistry - Education/Continuing Education
04.05.2016
Clues on the path to a new battery technology
Clues on the path to a new battery technology
Research news Rechargeable lithium air batteries are a next-generation technology: Theoretically they might be much lighter and offer better performance than current lithium ion batteries. However, currently they run out of steam after only a few charging cycles. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Forschungszentrum Jülich have now investigated the processes and discovered a possible culprit: highly reactive singlet oxygen, which is released when the batteries are charged.
Education/Continuing Education - Physics/Materials Science
22.02.2016
Soap bubbles' secrets go pop
Soap bubbles’ secrets go pop
Some phenomena that appear to be well understood are much more mysterious than it seems. In spite of the numerous applications that rely on the presence or absence of bubbles, no advanced scientific studies had been carried out so far into how bubbles form.
Earth Sciences - Education/Continuing Education
10.02.2016
Study challenges widely accepted theory of Yellowstone formation
Study challenges widely accepted theory of Yellowstone formation
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Understanding the complex geological processes that form supervolcanoes could ultimately help geologists determine what triggers their eruptions. A new study using an advanced computer model casts doubt on previously held theories about the Yellowstone supervolcano's origins, adding to the mystery of Yellowstone's formation.
Education/Continuing Education - Life Sciences
03.02.2015
One good turn: birds swap energy-sapping lead role
Migrating birds 'share the pain' of the arduous task of leading a v-formation, so that they can then take turns saving energy by following in another bird's wake, a new study shows. The research, by an international team led by Oxford University scientists, is the first convincing evidence for 'turn taking' reciprocal cooperative behaviour in birds.
Earth Sciences - Education/Continuing Education
10.09.2014
Thick-skinned dinosaur gets the last laugh
Thick-skinned dinosaur gets the last laugh
In life, Tyrannosaurus rex usually got the best of the less fearsome duck-billed dinosaurs, or hadrosaurs: T. rex ate them. But in death, the plant-eating hadrosaurs have proved more resilient than their carnivorous predators - and apparently all other dinosaurs - at least by the measure of their skin.
Earth Sciences - Education/Continuing Education
11.08.2014
Rise of the dinosaurs
Rise of the dinosaurs
The Jurassic and Cretaceous periods were the golden age of dinosaurs, during which the prehistoric giants roamed the Earth for nearly 135 million years. Paleontologists have unearthed numerous fossils from these periods, suggesting that dinosaurs were abundant throughout the world. But where and when dinosaurs first came into existence has been difficult to ascertain.
Physics/Materials Science - Education/Continuing Education
24.04.2014
Walking improves creativity
Walking improves creativity
Stanford researchers found that walking boosts creative inspiration. They examined creativity levels of people while they walked versus while they sat. A person's creative output increased by an average of 60 percent when walking. Steve Jobs, the late co-founder of Apple, was known for his walking meetings.
Astronomy - Education/Continuing Education
07.01.2014
Tiny (but ultra bright) quartet of ancient galaxies takes astronomers by surprise
Combining the power of two major NASA space telescopes, astronomers have found four young, exceptionally bright galaxies rich in emerging stars at a time when the universe was only 500 million years old. The tiny galaxies - captured early in the universe's formation - are about 10 to 20 times more luminous than anything previously seen and about one-twentieth the size of the Milky Way, Earth's more mature home galaxy.
Education/Continuing Education
11.12.2013
Even when test scores go up, some cognitive abilities don’t
MIT neuroscientists find even high-performing schools don't influence their students' abstract reasoning. To evaluate school quality, states require students to take standardized tests; in many cases, passing those tests is necessary to receive a high-school diploma. These high-stakes tests have also been shown to predict students' future educational attainment and adult employment and income.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Education/Continuing Education
19.11.2013
Testing the test - new study sheds light on medical school admissions
A clinical aptitude test originally pioneered by The University of Nottingham has been proven to be a significant predictor of performance in medical students. The UKCAT was launched in 2006 in response to a need to widen access to medical education and provide a supplementary assessment in the context of so-called A level grade inflation.
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