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Physics - Electroengineering - 15.04.2024
Quantum Precision: A New Kind of Resistor
Quantum Precision: A New Kind of Resistor
Researchers at the University of Würzburg have developed a method that can improve the performance of quantum resistance standards. It's based on a quantum phenomenon called Quantum Anomalous Hall effect. The precise measurement of electrical resistance is essential in industrial production or electronics - for example, in the manufacture of high-tech sensors, microchips and flight controls.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.04.2024
Resistance-Free Electron Channels
New Technique Lets Scientists Create Resistance-Free Electron Channels " layout="backlink-only" Key Takeaways Scientists have taken the first atomic-resolution images of an exotic quantum phenomenon that could help researchers advance quantum computing and energy-efficient electronics. The work enables the visualization and control of electron flow in a unique class of quantum insulators.

Physics - Electroengineering - 04.04.2024
Progress in Quantum Physics: Researchers Tame Superconductors
Progress in Quantum Physics: Researchers Tame Superconductors
An international team including researchers from the University of Würzburg has succeeded in creating a special state of superconductivity. This discovery could advance the development of quantum computers. Superconductors are materials that can conduct electricity without electrical resistance - making them the ideal base material for electronic components in MRI machines, magnetic levitation trains and even particle accelerators.

Physics - Electroengineering - 04.04.2024
Propelling atomically layered magnets toward green computers
MIT scientists have tackled key obstacles to bringing 2D magnetic materials into practical use, setting the stage for the next generation of energy-efficient computers. Globally, computation is booming at an unprecedented rate, fueled by the boons of artificial intelligence. With this, the staggering energy demand of the world's computing infrastructure has become a major concern, and the development of computing devices that are far more energy-efficient is a leading challenge for the scientific community.

Electroengineering - Health - 04.04.2024
Unlocking new science with devices that control electric power
Unlocking new science with devices that control electric power
Seron Electronics, founded by Mo Mirvakili PhD '17, makes research equipment with applications including microelectronics, clean energy, optics, biomedicine, and beyond. Mo Mirvakili PhD '17 was in the middle of an experiment as a postdoc at MIT when the Covid-19 pandemic hit. Grappling with restricted access to laboratory facilities, he decided to transform his bathroom into a makeshift lab.

Environment - Electroengineering - 26.03.2024
Report reveals what kind of households are the most energy efficient
Smaller and newer homes use less energy than larger, older ones, confirms a new report by UCL researchers that offers unique insights into household energy consumption across the country. The report, published by UCL's Smart Energy Research Lab (SERL), analysed the gas and electricity use of more than 13,000 representative households across Great Britain over two years.

Physics - Electroengineering - 13.03.2024
A new ion trap for larger quantum computers
A new ion trap for larger quantum computers
Researchers at ETH have managed to trap ions using static electric and magnetic fields and to perform quantum operations on them. In the future such traps could be used to realize quantum computers with far more quantum bits than have been possible up to now. The energy states of electrons in an atom follow the laws of quantum mechanics: they are not continuously distributed but restricted to certain well-defined values - this is also called quantisation.

Electroengineering - Physics - 21.02.2024
Freezing electronics to control diamond spin qubits
Freezing electronics to control diamond spin qubits
Researchers from Fujitsu and QuTech have developed new and ultra-cold electronic circuits to control diamond-based quantum bits. As a result of their joint research project, it becomes possible to build larger quantum computers, through overcoming the 'wiring bottleneck', while maintaining high quality performance.

Physics - Electroengineering - 19.02.2024
Spintronics: the electronics of the future could be antiferromagnetic
Spintronics: the electronics of the future could be antiferromagnetic
It is an important step forward in spintronics: the magnetic state of certain materials can be switched using surface induced strain. All our electronics are based on electrical charges being transported from one place to another. Electrons move, current flows, signals are transmitted by applying an electrical voltage.

Physics - Electroengineering - 08.02.2024
Technique could improve the sensitivity of quantum sensing devices
Technique could improve the sensitivity of quantum sensing devices
The method lets researchers identify and control larger numbers of atomic-scale defects, to build a bigger system of qubits. In quantum sensing, atomic-scale quantum systems are used to measure electromagnetic fields, as well as properties like rotation, acceleration, and distance, far more precisely than classical sensors can.

Physics - Electroengineering - 07.02.2024
Researchers measure and control interactions between magnetic ripples using lasers
Researchers measure and control interactions between magnetic ripples using lasers
Fundamental step toward ultrafast magnetism-based computers comes from multi-institution team involving UCLA Science + Technology Fundamental step toward ultrafast magnetism-based computers comes from multi-institution team involving UCLA Key takeaways If computers used ripples in magnetic fields, called magnons, to encode and process information, the result would be devices with potential memory speed on the order of billionths of a second.

Microtechnics - Electroengineering - 31.01.2024
3D-printed pneumatic modules replace electric controls in soft robots
3D-printed pneumatic modules replace electric controls in soft robots
Research team at the University of Freiburg develops 3D-printed pneumatic logic modules that control the movements of soft robots using only air pressure In the future, soft robots will be able to perform tasks that cannot be done by conventional robots. These soft robots could be used in terrain that is difficult to access and in environments where they are exposed to chemicals or radiation that would harm electronically controlled robots made of metal.

Electroengineering - Microtechnics - 30.01.2024
Artificial muscles - lighter, safer, more robust
Artificial muscles - lighter, safer, more robust
Researchers at ETH Zurich have recently developed artificial muscles for robot motion. Their solution offers several advantages over previous technologies: it can be used wherever robots need to be soft rather than rigid or where they need more sensitivity when interacting with their environment. Many roboticists dream of building robots that are not just a combination of metal or other hard materials and motors but also softer and more adaptable.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.01.2024
A new state in a quantum material
A new state in a quantum material
Scientists at EPFL break new ground in quantum physics, revealing a mysterious and unique behavior in a quantum magnetic material and hinting at future tech breakthroughs. In the mysterious world of quantum materials, things don't always behave as we expect. These materials have unique properties governed by the rules of quantum mechanics, which often means that they can perform tasks in ways traditional materials cannot - like conducting electricity without loss - or having magnetic properties that may prove useful in advanced technologies.

Physics - Electroengineering - 22.01.2024
Topological Quantum Device Produced
Topological Quantum Device Produced
A significant breakthrough has been achieved by quantum physicists from Dresden and Würzburg. They've created a semiconductor device where exceptional robustness and sensitivity are ensured by a quantum phenomenon. Semiconductor devices are tiny switching components that control electron flow in modern electronic devices.

Electroengineering - Physics - 18.01.2024
Self-powered sensor automatically harvests magnetic energy
Self-powered sensor automatically harvests magnetic energy
A system designed at MIT could allow sensors to operate in remote settings, without batteries. MIT researchers have developed a battery-free, self-powered sensor that can harvest energy from its environment. Because it requires no battery that must be recharged or replaced, and because it requires no special wiring, such a sensor could be embedded in a hard-to-reach place, like inside the inner workings of a ship's engine.

Electroengineering - Materials Science - 15.01.2024
Researchers turn up the heat on flexible temperature sensor development
Engineers from UK universities have developed a new method of measuring temperature through the interaction of a soft and flexible 'smart skin' sensor with electromagnetic waves. Engineers from UK universities have developed a new method of measuring temperature through the interaction of a soft and flexible 'smart skin' sensor with electromagnetic waves.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.12.2023
Unconventional magnets: stress reduces frustration
Unconventional magnets: stress reduces frustration
An international research team recently demonstrated how magnetism can be actively changed by pressure. Magnetism occurs depending on how electrons behave. For example, the elementary particles can generate an electric current with their charge and thereby induce a magnetic field. However, magnetism can also arise through the collective alignment of the magnetic moments (spins) in a material.

Electroengineering - Transport - 19.12.2023
Preventing power quality issues caused by electric vehicle charging
Preventing power quality issues caused by electric vehicle charging
Along with ElaadNL, PhD researcher Tim Slangen studied the phenomenon known as supraharmonic disturbances, which can adversely affect the operation and efficiency of electrical appliances. With the growing and obvious concerns about climate change, the transition from fossil to renewable energy is accelerating.

Physics - Electroengineering - 19.12.2023
Superconductor with on/off switches
As industrial computing needs grow, the size and energy consumption of the relevant hardware must keep up with those demands. A solution to this dilemma could lie in superconducting materials, which reduce that energy consumption exponentially. Imagine cooling a giant data center - full of constantly running servers - down to nearly absolute zero, enabling large-scale computation with incredible energy efficiency.
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