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Physics - Electroengineering - 27.09.2019
An Elegant Solution to the Soft Sensing Challenge
From warehouses to hospitals, soft robots are used in different places to assist humans in moving items, treating patients and gathering information. As interests in these robots keep growing, Carnegie Mellon University scientists are developing ways to give them the kind of sensing capabilities found in natural soft tissue.

Electroengineering - Environment - 12.09.2019
Low-cost device generates electricity using natural cooling phenomenon
When frost forms on the ground overnight even when temperatures are well above freezing, or water droplets appear on car windshields even on a clear night, the cause is often a phenomenon called radiative sky cooling. In a paper published in the journal Joule, researchers led by a UCLA materials scientist report that they have leveraged the principles behind radiative sky cooling to develop an innovative way to produce renewable energy at night.

Environment - Electroengineering - 03.09.2019
River under current
River under current
Switzerland is proud of its strongly developed use of hydropower. This covers almost 60% of the country's electricity needs. The production of around 36 terawatt hours (TWh) per year is now to be increased by a further 3 TWh by 2050 as part of the energy strategy. Eawag, the water research institute, is today presenting internal and external experts at the Swiss Museum of Transport in Lucerne on the challenges this poses for water bodies and the approaches society can take to meet these challenges.

Electroengineering - 21.08.2019
Birmingham technology could defend UK against power blackouts
Technology developed at the University of Birmingham could protect the UK and other countries from national electricity blackouts. Britain has high-voltage, direct-current (HVDC) transmission links with neighbouring countries, including France, Ireland, Holland and Norway - an efficient way of transporting electricity, but vulnerable to alternating-current (AC) faults.

Physics - Electroengineering - 16.08.2019
Atomically thin heat shield protects electronics
Atomically thin heat shield protects electronics
Atomically thin materials developed by Stanford researchers could create heat-shields for cell phones or laptops that would protect people and temperature-sensitive components and make future electronic gadgets even more compact. Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode.

Environment - Electroengineering - 05.08.2019
CryoSat conquers ice on Arctic lakes
CryoSat conquers ice on Arctic lakes
The rapidly changing climate in the Arctic is not only linked to melting glaciers and declining sea ice, but also to thinning ice on lakes. The presence of lake ice can be easily monitored by imaging sensors and standard satellite observations, but now adding to its list of achievements, CryoSat can be used to measure the thickness of lake ice - another indicator of climate change.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.07.2019
New quantum trick for graphene: magnetism
Physicists were stunned when two twisted sheets of graphene showed signs of superconductivity. Now Stanford scientists have shown that the wonder material also generates a type of magnetism once only dreamed of theoretically. Sometimes the best discoveries happen when scientists least expect it. While trying to replicate another team's finding, Stanford physicists recently stumbled upon a novel form of magnetism, predicted but never seen before, that is generated when two honeycomb-shaped lattices of carbon are carefully stacked and rotated to a special angle.

Physics - Electroengineering - 12.07.2019
Rice device channels heat into light
Rice device channels heat into light
Carbon nanotube films created at Rice University enable method to recycle waste heat The ever-more-humble carbon nanotube may be just the device to make solar panels - and anything else that loses energy through heat - far more efficient. Rice University scientists are designing arrays of aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes to channel mid-infrared radiation (aka heat) and greatly raise the efficiency of solar energy systems.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.07.2019
On-demand control of terahertz and infrared waves
On-demand control of terahertz and infrared waves
Researchers from the University of Geneva and the University of Manchester have confirmed experimentally the theory of very strong magneto-optical resonance in graphene. The ability to control infrared and terahertz waves using magnetic or electric fields is one of the great challenges in physics that could revolutionise opto-electronics, telecommunications and medical diagnostics.

Electroengineering - 08.07.2019
No escape for mosquitoes
No escape for mosquitoes
Venus flytraps are capable of detecting the movements of even the smallest insects. This mechanism protects the plant against starving from hyperactivity as a new study conducted by scientists from Würzburg and Cambridge reveals. Physically bound to a specific location, plants have to devise special ways to secure their supply of vital nutrients.

Physics - Electroengineering - 05.06.2019
Magnetism discovered in the Earth's mantle: New findings on the Earth's magnetic field
Magnetism discovered in the Earth’s mantle: New findings on the Earth’s magnetic field
New findings on the Earth's magnetic field: researchers show that the iron oxide hematite remains magnetic deep within the Earth's mantle / Study published in "Nature" journal The huge magnetic field which surrounds the Earth, protecting it from radiation and charged particles from space - and which many animals even use for orientation purposes - is changing constantly, which is why geoscientists keep it constantly under surveillance.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 23.05.2019
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes
Researchers have developed washable, wearable 'batteries' based on cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks and woven directly into fabrics. The devices could be used for flexible circuits, healthcare monitoring, energy conversion, and other applications. The team, led by Dr Felice Torrisi , who recently joined Imperial from the University of Cambridge, have shown how graphene - an atom-thick sheet of carbon - and other related materials can be directly incorporated into fabrics.

Physics - Electroengineering - 22.05.2019
Scientists break record for highest-temperature superconductor
University of Chicago scientists are part of an international research team that has discovered superconductivity-the ability to conduct electricity perfectly-at the highest temperatures ever recorded. Using advanced technology at UChicago-affiliated Argonne National Laboratory , the team studied a class of materials in which they observed superconductivity at temperatures of about minus-23 degrees Celsius (minus-9 degrees Fahrenheit)-a jump of about 50 degrees compared to the previous confirmed record.

Electroengineering - Computer Science / Telecom - 06.05.2019
Adding satnav to turn power grids into smart systems
Adding satnav to turn power grids into smart systems
6 May 2019 An ESA-backed project is harnessing satnav to insert an intelligent sense of place and time to power grids, to provide early warning of potentially dangerous electricity network failures. Four years ago an apparent fire from nowhere forced the evacuation of 5 000 people from central London.

Electroengineering - 02.05.2019
New material to pave the way for more efficient electronic devices
New material to pave the way for more efficient electronic devices
Researchers at the University of Bristol have successfully demonstrated the high thermal conductivity of a new material, paving the way for safer and more efficient electronic devices - including mobile phones, radars and even electric cars. The team, led by Professor Martin Kuball at the Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR) [MK1] , found that by making an ultra-pure version of Boron Nitride it was possible to demonstrate its thermal conductivity potential for the first time, which at 550W/mk is twice that of copper.

Environment - Electroengineering - 26.04.2019
Using 60% less water in paper production
Using 60% less water in paper production
An EPFL researcher has developed a mathematical model for optimizing heat transfer in factories and dramatically reducing water and energy consumption. The model could, in theory, cut water use by 60% at a Canadian paper mill and allow the facility to produce as much as six times more power. Manufacturing consumer goods requires vast quantities of water, heat and electricity.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.03.2019
A new spin on nanophysics: Part 2 of the series
A new spin on nanophysics: Part 2 of the series "Under lock and key at Münster University"
Part 2 of the series "Under lock and key at Münster University": the vacuum machine at the Institute of Physics is used to investigate spin phenomena The yellow stickers can already be seen from a distance: "Laser beam", "High voltage - danger to life", "No unauthorized access". The locked door with the warning notices is located at the end of a long, dark corridor on the fourth floor of the Institute of Physics at the University of Münster.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.02.2019
How to Freeze Heat Conduction
How to Freeze Heat Conduction
Physicists have discovered a new effect, which makes it possible to create excellent thermal insulators which conduct electricity. Such materials can be used to convert waste heat into electrical energy. Every day we lose valuable energy in the form of waste heat - in technical devices at home, but also in large energy systems.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.02.2019
The holy grail of nanowire production
The holy grail of nanowire production
EPFL researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces. This discovery could make it possible to grow nanowires on electronic platforms, with potential applications including the integration of nanolasers into electronic chips and improved energy conversion in solar panels.

Electroengineering - Physics - 15.02.2019
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
EPFL researchers have developed a compact and efficient medium-frequency transformer. Their device is poised to enhance the flexibility and efficiency of tomorrow's smart grids and DC power distribution networks. An EPFL-made prototype has been thoroughly tested and presented in several tutorials designed for experts from the academic and industrial worlds.
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