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Electroengineering



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Electroengineering - Materials Science - 29.11.2018
Switching identities: Revolutionary insulator-like material also conducts electricity
For News Media THIS NEWS IS EMBARGOED BY THE JOURNAL SCIENCE UNTIL 2 P.M. EST, NOV. 29, 2018 × University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have made a material that can transition from an electricity-transmitting metal to a nonconducting insulating material without changing its atomic structure.

Electroengineering - Innovation / Technology - 19.11.2018
Imec, Ghent University and SEED Demonstrate Electronics in Hydrogel-based Soft Lenses
Imec, Ghent University and SEED Demonstrate Electronics in Hydrogel-based Soft Lenses
imec, Ghent University, and SEED Co., Ltd. have developed a contact lens with autonomous electronics, opening the door to unique applications such as lenses with sensors and/or drug-delivery systems for the treatment of eye disorders.

Astronomy / Space Science - Electroengineering - 16.11.2018
Electric blue thrusters propelling BepiColombo to Mercury
Electric blue thrusters propelling BepiColombo to Mercury
ESA Space Engineering & Technology Preparing for the Future Shaping the Future 16 November 2018 In mid-December, twin discs will begin glowing blue on the underside of a minibus-sized spacecraft in deep space. At that moment Europe and Japan's BepiColombo mission will have just come a crucial step closer to Mercury.

Environment - Electroengineering - 14.11.2018
Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers
Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers
Simple, scalable wireless system uses the RFID tags on billions of products to sense contamination. MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a wireless system that leverages the cheap RFID tags already on hundreds of billions of products to sense potential food contamination - with no hardware modifications needed.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 29.10.2018
Inside these fibers, droplets are on the move
Inside these fibers, droplets are on the move
Fibers containing systems for mixing, separating, and testing fluids may open up new possibilities for medical screening. Microfluidics devices are tiny systems with microscopic channels that can be used for chemical or biomedical testing and research. In a potentially game-changing advance, MIT researchers have now incorporated microfluidics systems into individual fibers, making it possible to process much larger volumes of fluid, in more complex ways.

Chemistry - Electroengineering - 23.10.2018
How to mass produce cell-sized robots
How to mass produce cell-sized robots
Technique from MIT could lead to tiny, self-powered devices for environmental, industrial, or medical monitoring. The microscopic devices, which the team calls "syncells" (short for synthetic cells), might eventually be used to monitor conditions inside an oil or gas pipeline, or to search out disease while floating through the bloodstream.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 22.10.2018
Monitoring electromagnetic signals in the brain with MRI
Monitoring electromagnetic signals in the brain with MRI
Technique could be used to detect light or electrical fields in living tissue. Researchers commonly study brain function by monitoring two types of electromagnetism - electric fields and light. However, most methods for measuring these phenomena in the brain are very invasive. MIT engineers have now devised a new technique to detect either electrical activity or optical signals in the brain using a minimally invasive sensor for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Electroengineering - 10.10.2018
Tax incentives reduce energy consumption - if effectively implemented
Tax incentives reduce energy consumption - if effectively implemented
By studying the effects of Basel's electricity levy, researchers at the University of Lucerne investigated how tax incentives work in practice and how their impact on energy consumption could be increased. The National Council and the Council of States decided not to debate the proposals of the Federal Council on the second phase of the Energy Strategy 2050 concerning the climate and energy tax incentive KELS.

Physics - Electroengineering - 08.10.2018
Study opens route to flexible electronics made from exotic materials
Study opens route to flexible electronics made from exotic materials
Cost-effective method produces semiconducting films from materials that outperform silicon. The vast majority of computing devices today are made from silicon, the second most abundant element on Earth, after oxygen. Silicon can be found in various forms in rocks, clay, sand, and soil. And while it is not the best semiconducting material that exists on the planet, it is by far the most readily available.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.09.2018
Small modulator for big data
Conventional lithium niobite modulators, the longtime workhorse of the optoelectronic industry, may soon go the way of the vacuum tube and floppy disc. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a new method to fabricate and design integrated, on-chip modulators 100 times smaller and 20 times more efficient than current lithium niobite (LN) modulators.

Physics - Electroengineering - 10.09.2018
Diamond dust enables low-cost, high-efficiency magnetic field detection
Diamond dust enables low-cost, high-efficiency magnetic field detection
Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to print (Opens in new window) UC Berkeley engineers have created a device that dramatically reduces the energy needed to power magnetic field detectors, which could revolutionize how we measure the magnetic fields that flow through our electronics, our planet and even our bodies.

Environment - Electroengineering - 06.09.2018
Adding power choices reduces cost and risk of carbon-free electricity
Adding power choices reduces cost and risk of carbon-free electricity
To curb greenhouse gas emissions, nations, states, and cities should aim for a mix of fuel-saving, flexible, and highly reliable sources. In major legislation passed at the end of August, California committed to creating a 100 percent carbon-free electricity grid - once again leading other nations, states, and cities in setting aggressive policies for slashing greenhouse gas emissions.

Physics - Electroengineering - 30.08.2018
Research could lead to security scanners capable of detecting explosives
Using a single pixel camera and Terahertz electromagnetic waves, a team of Physicists at the University of Sussex have devised a blueprint which could lead to the development of airport scanners capable of detecting explosives.

Physics - Electroengineering - 13.08.2018
Printed electronics breakthrough could lead to flexible electronics revolution
A new form of electronics manufacturing which embeds silicon nanowires into flexible surfaces could lead to radical new forms of bendable electronics, scientists say. In a new paper published today in the journal Microsystems and Nanoengineering, engineers from the University of Glasgow describe how they have for the first time been able to affordably ‘print' high-mobility semiconductor nanowires onto flexible surfaces to develop high-performance ultra-thin electronic layers.

Electroengineering - Art and Design - 08.08.2018
Introducing the latest in textiles: Soft hardware
Introducing the latest in textiles: Soft hardware
Researchers incorporate optoelectronic diodes into fibers and weave them into washable fabrics. cloth that has electronic devices built right into it. Researchers at MIT have now embedded high speed optoelectronic semiconductor devices, including light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and diode photodetectors, within fibers that were then woven at Inman Mills, in South Carolina, into soft, washable fabrics and made into communication systems.

Physics - Electroengineering - 01.08.2018
On-chip optical filter processes wide range of light wavelengths
On-chip optical filter processes wide range of light wavelengths
Silicon-based system offers smaller, cheaper alternative to other "broadband" filters; could improve a variety of photonic devices. MIT researchers have designed an optical filter on a chip that can process optical signals from across an extremely wide spectrum of light at once, something never before available to integrated optics systems that process data using light.

Health - Electroengineering - 26.07.2018
A novel approach to cardiac surgery
Stanford medical student Kevin Cyr is part of a team of researchers using 3D printing to build custom cardiac surgical devices. Second-year medical student Kevin Cyr is part of a team of Stanford researchers investigating new ways to survey electricity in the heart. The research has led to the development of cardiac surgical devices that could one day help patients who suffer from a common heart ailment.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.07.2018
EPFL uses excitons to take electronics into the future
EPFL uses excitons to take electronics into the future
EPFL researchers have developed a transistor based on excitons - a type of particle most people have not heard of - that is able to function at room temperature. This breakthrough could lead to a new breed of faster, more energy efficient and smaller electronics. Excitons could revolutionize the way engineers approach electronics.

Electroengineering - Life Sciences - 23.07.2018
Cell-sized robots can sense their environment
Cell-sized robots can sense their environment
Researchers at MIT have created what may be the smallest robots yet that can sense their environment, store data, and even carry out computational tasks. These devices, which are about the size of a human egg cell, consist of tiny electronic circuits made of two-dimensional materials, piggybacking on minuscule particles called colloids.

Physics - Electroengineering - 19.07.2018
Puzzling results explained: a multiband approach to Coulomb drag and indirect excitons
Inleiding: Mystifying results in excitonic Coulomb drag experiments obtained independently by two research groups in the USA explained by the CMT group (M. Zarenia, D. Neilson and F. Peeters) in a recent Physical Review Letters paper. Taking a multiband approach explains ‘electron-hole reverse drag' and exciton formation Mystifying experimental results obtained independently by two research groups in the USA seemed to show coupled holes and electrons moving in the opposite direction to theory.
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