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Physics - Electroengineering - 27.03.2020
Energy-harvesting design aims to turn Wi-Fi signals into usable power
Energy-harvesting design aims to turn Wi-Fi signals into usable power
Device for harnessing terahertz radiation might enable self-powering implants, cellphones, other portable electronics. Any device that sends out a Wi-Fi signal also emits terahertz waves -electromagnetic waves with a frequency somewhere between microwaves and infrared light. These high-frequency radiation waves, known as "T-rays," are also produced by almost anything that registers a temperature, including our own bodies and the inanimate objects around us.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.03.2020
A nanoscale device that can see through walls
A nanoscale device that can see through walls
Researchers at EPFL have developed a nanodevice that operates more than 10 times faster than today's fastest transistors, and about 100 times faster than the transistors you have on your computers. This new device enables the generation of high-power terahertz waves. These waves, which are notoriously difficult to produce, are useful in a rich variety of applications ranging from imaging and sensing to high-speed wireless communications.

Electroengineering - 20.03.2020
Flat-panel technology could transform antennas, wireless and cell phone communications
Flat-panel technology could transform antennas, wireless and cell phone communications
Electronically controlled 2-D reflector promises improved microwave communications, beam steering without moving pieces, and one-way microwave mirrors Our new reflectors offer lightweight, low-profile alternatives to conventional antennas. This is a potential boon for satellites, where minimizing weight and size is crucial.

Physics - Electroengineering - 05.03.2020
Novel method for easier scaling of quantum devices
Novel method for easier scaling of quantum devices
System "recruits" defects that usually cause disruptions, using them to instead carry out quantum operations. In an advance that may help researchers scale up quantum devices, an MIT team has developed a method to "recruit" neighboring quantum bits made of nanoscale defects in diamond, so that instead of causing disruptions they help carry out quantum operations.

Electroengineering - Physics - 04.03.2020
Bristol discovery is significant step toward developing electronics for extreme energy efficiency
Bristol discovery is significant step toward developing electronics for extreme energy efficiency
The work, which is reported , was carried out in collaboration with the University of Southampton and the Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. The invention is an important development for all-electric vehicles and more-electric aircraft which require electronics with integrated data storage that can operate in extreme temperatures with high energy efficiency.

Electroengineering - Computer Science / Telecom - 03.03.2020
Integrating electronics onto physical prototypes
Integrating electronics onto physical prototypes
In place of flat "breadboards," 3D-printed CurveBoards enable easier testing of circuit design on electronics products. The aim is to provide a faster, easier way to test circuit functions and user interactions with products such as smart devices and flexible electronics. Breadboards are rectangular boards with arrays of pinholes drilled into the surface.

Astronomy / Space Science - Electroengineering - 24.02.2020
Quakes, dust devils and midnight magnetic pulses: findings from a year on Mars
Quakes, dust devils and midnight magnetic pulses: findings from a year on Mars
InSight's Imperial-designed instrument has revealed that Mars trembles more often, but also more mildly, than expected. Detecting hundreds of marsquakes on a planet 140 million miles from Earth, using sensors developed in the UK, is an important achievement. Amanda Solloway UK Science Minister An international team of scientists led by NASA created Mars InSight , the first mission to study the deep interior of Mars , to generate unprecedented data about the planet's inner structure.

Physics - Electroengineering - 19.02.2020
Time-resolved measurement in a memory device
Time-resolved measurement in a memory device
Researchers at ETH have measured the timing of single writing events in a novel magnetic memory device with a resolution of less than 100 picoseconds. Their results are relevant for the next generation of main memories based on magnetism. At the Department for Materials of the ETH in Zurich, Pietro Gambardella and his collaborators investigate tomorrow's memory devices.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 05.02.2020
Engineers mix and match materials to make new stretchy electronics
Engineers mix and match materials to make new stretchy electronics
Next-generation devices made with new "peel and stack" method may include electronic chips worn on the skin. Because computer chips are rigid, the electronic devices that they power, such as our smartphones, laptops, watches, and televisions, are similarly inflexible. Now a process developed by MIT engineers may be the key to manufacturing flexible electronics with multiple functionalities in a cost-effective way.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 29.01.2020
Bionic Jellyfish Swim Faster and More Efficiently
Engineers at Caltech and Stanford University have developed a tiny prosthetic that enables jellyfish to swim faster and more efficiently than they normally do, without stressing the animals. The researchers behind the project envision a future in which jellyfish equipped with sensors could be directed to explore and record information about the ocean.

Microtechnics - Electroengineering - 18.12.2019
A soft robotic insect that survives being flattened by a fly swatter
A soft robotic insect that survives being flattened by a fly swatter
Researchers at EPFL have developed an ultra-light robotic insect that uses its soft artificial muscles to move at 3 cm per second across different types of terrain. It can be folded or crushed and yet continue to move. Imagine swarms of robotic insects moving around us as they perform various tasks.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.12.2019
In surprise breakthrough, scientists create quantum states in everyday electronics
After decades of miniaturization, the electronic components we've relied on for computers and modern technologies are now starting to reach fundamental limits. Faced with this challenge, engineers and scientists around the world are turning toward a radically new paradigm: quantum information technologies. Quantum technology, which harnesses the strange rules that govern particles at the atomic level, is normally thought of as much too delicate to coexist with the electronics we use every day in phones, laptops and cars.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.12.2019
Electronic map reveals 'rules of the road' in superconductor
Electronic map reveals ’rules of the road’ in superconductor
Band structure map exposes iron selenide's enigmatic electronic signature Using a clever technique that causes unruly crystals of iron selenide to snap into alignment, Rice University physicists have drawn a detailed map that reveals the "rules of the road” for electrons both in normal conditions and in the critical moments just before the material transforms into a superconductor.

Physics - Electroengineering - 22.11.2019
New method for using spin waves in magnetic materials
New method for using spin waves in magnetic materials
Smaller, faster, more energy-efficient - this is the goal that developers of electronic devices have been working towards for years. In order to be able to miniaturize individual components of mobile phones or computers for example, magnetic waves are currently regarded as promising alternatives to conventional data transmission functioning by means of electric currents.

Astronomy / Space Science - Electroengineering - 06.11.2019
132 grams to communicate with Mars
On behalf of the ESA, UCLouvain has developed antennas for the LaRa instrument that will go to Mars in 2020 to study the red planet's habitability.

Electroengineering - Chemistry - 05.11.2019
Scientists develop adhesive which can be unstuck in a magnetic field, reducing landfill waste
Researchers at the University of Sussex have developed a glue which can unstick when placed in a magnetic field, meaning products otherwise destined for landfill, could now be dismantled and recycled at the end of their life. Currently, items like mobile phones, microwaves and car dashboards are assembled using adhesives.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.10.2019
The quantum internet is within reach
The quantum internet is within reach
An international team headed by physicists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has, for the first time ever, experimentally implemented secure quantum communication in the microwave band in a local quantum network. The new architecture represents a crucial step on the road to distributed quantum computing.

Electroengineering - 23.10.2019
Excitons will shape the future of electronic devices
Excitons will shape the future of electronic devices
Excitons are quasiparticles made from the excited state of electrons and - according to research being carried out EPFL - have the potential to boost the energy efficiency of our everyday devices. It's a whole new way of thinking about electronics. Excitons - or quasiparticles formed when electrons absorb light - stand to revolutionize the building blocks of circuits.

Electroengineering - Politics - 21.10.2019
Direct Current Can Amp Up Existing Transmission Lines
The U.S. energy system has seen sweeping changes in the past two decades. Natural gas replaced coal as the dominant fossil source of power generation, and wind and solar energy now contribute roughly 9% of the nation's electricity, compared to almost none 20 years ago. Because of these changes, less carbon is being emitted by the power sector per unit of electricity produced.

Physics - Electroengineering - 27.09.2019
An Elegant Solution to the Soft Sensing Challenge
From warehouses to hospitals, soft robots are used in different places to assist humans in moving items, treating patients and gathering information. As interests in these robots keep growing, Carnegie Mellon University scientists are developing ways to give them the kind of sensing capabilities found in natural soft tissue.
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