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Physics - Electroengineering - 21.02.2019
How to Freeze Heat Conduction
How to Freeze Heat Conduction
Physicists have discovered a new effect, which makes it possible to create excellent thermal insulators which conduct electricity. Such materials can be used to convert waste heat into electrical energy. Every day we lose valuable energy in the form of waste heat - in technical devices at home, but also in large energy systems.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.02.2019
The holy grail of nanowire production
The holy grail of nanowire production
EPFL researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces. This discovery could make it possible to grow nanowires on electronic platforms, with potential applications including the integration of nanolasers into electronic chips and improved energy conversion in solar panels.

Electroengineering - Physics - 15.02.2019
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
EPFL researchers have developed a compact and efficient medium-frequency transformer. Their device is poised to enhance the flexibility and efficiency of tomorrow's smart grids and DC power distribution networks. An EPFL-made prototype has been thoroughly tested and presented in several tutorials designed for experts from the academic and industrial worlds.

Physics - Electroengineering - 14.02.2019
Giving keener
Giving keener "electric eyesight" to autonomous vehicles
On-chip system that detects signals at sub-terahertz wavelengths could help steer driverless cars through fog and dust. Autonomous vehicles relying on light-based image sensors often struggle to see through blinding conditions, such as fog. But MIT researchers have developed a sub-terahertz-radiation receiving system that could help steer driverless cars when traditional methods fail.

Physics - Electroengineering - 12.02.2019
Los Alamos teams with Oak Ridge, EPB to demonstrate next-generation grid security tech
Los Alamos teams with Oak Ridge, EPB to demonstrate next-generation grid security tech
Quantum science comes to energy grid network protection Oak Ridge and Los Alamos national laboratory researchers collaborated with Chattanooga utility EPB to demonstrate next-generation grid security technology. Back row, from left: EPB's Ken Jones, Manager, Fiber Design; Nick Peters, ORNL senior scientist and leader of the laboratory's Quantum Communications team; and ORNL researcher Phil Evans.

Physics - Electroengineering - 01.02.2019
’Magnetic graphene’ switches between insulator and conductor
Researchers have found that certain ultra-thin magnetic materials can switch from insulator to conductor under high pressure, a phenomenon that could be used in the development of next-generation electronics and memory storage devices.

Electroengineering - Materials Science - 28.01.2019
Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials
Converting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materials
Device made from flexible, inexpensive materials could power large-area electronics, wearables, medical devices, and more. Imagine a world where smartphones, laptops, wearables, and other electronics are powered without batteries. Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have taken a step in that direction, with the first fully flexible device that can convert energy from Wi-Fi signals into electricity that could power electronics.

Electroengineering - Physics - 10.12.2018
Topological Matters: Toward a New Kind of Transistor
Topological Matters: Toward a New Kind of Transistor
X-ray experiments at Berkeley Lab provide first demonstration of room temperature switching in ultrathin material that could serve as a 'topological transistor' Billions of tiny transistors supply the processing power in modern smartphones, controlling the flow of electrons with rapid on-and-off switching.

Electroengineering - Materials Science - 29.11.2018
Switching identities: Revolutionary insulator-like material also conducts electricity
For News Media THIS NEWS IS EMBARGOED BY THE JOURNAL SCIENCE UNTIL 2 P.M. EST, NOV. 29, 2018 × University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have made a material that can transition from an electricity-transmitting metal to a nonconducting insulating material without changing its atomic structure.

Electroengineering - Innovation / Technology - 19.11.2018
Imec, Ghent University and SEED Demonstrate Electronics in Hydrogel-based Soft Lenses
Imec, Ghent University and SEED Demonstrate Electronics in Hydrogel-based Soft Lenses
imec, Ghent University, and SEED Co., Ltd. have developed a contact lens with autonomous electronics, opening the door to unique applications such as lenses with sensors and/or drug-delivery systems for the treatment of eye disorders.

Astronomy / Space Science - Electroengineering - 16.11.2018
Electric blue thrusters propelling BepiColombo to Mercury
Electric blue thrusters propelling BepiColombo to Mercury
ESA Space Engineering & Technology Preparing for the Future Shaping the Future 16 November 2018 In mid-December, twin discs will begin glowing blue on the underside of a minibus-sized spacecraft in deep space. At that moment Europe and Japan's BepiColombo mission will have just come a crucial step closer to Mercury.

Environment - Electroengineering - 14.11.2018
Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers
Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers
Simple, scalable wireless system uses the RFID tags on billions of products to sense contamination. MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a wireless system that leverages the cheap RFID tags already on hundreds of billions of products to sense potential food contamination - with no hardware modifications needed.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 29.10.2018
Inside these fibers, droplets are on the move
Inside these fibers, droplets are on the move
Fibers containing systems for mixing, separating, and testing fluids may open up new possibilities for medical screening. Microfluidics devices are tiny systems with microscopic channels that can be used for chemical or biomedical testing and research. In a potentially game-changing advance, MIT researchers have now incorporated microfluidics systems into individual fibers, making it possible to process much larger volumes of fluid, in more complex ways.

Chemistry - Electroengineering - 23.10.2018
How to mass produce cell-sized robots
How to mass produce cell-sized robots
Technique from MIT could lead to tiny, self-powered devices for environmental, industrial, or medical monitoring. The microscopic devices, which the team calls "syncells" (short for synthetic cells), might eventually be used to monitor conditions inside an oil or gas pipeline, or to search out disease while floating through the bloodstream.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 22.10.2018
Monitoring electromagnetic signals in the brain with MRI
Monitoring electromagnetic signals in the brain with MRI
Technique could be used to detect light or electrical fields in living tissue. Researchers commonly study brain function by monitoring two types of electromagnetism - electric fields and light. However, most methods for measuring these phenomena in the brain are very invasive. MIT engineers have now devised a new technique to detect either electrical activity or optical signals in the brain using a minimally invasive sensor for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Electroengineering - 10.10.2018
Tax incentives reduce energy consumption - if effectively implemented
Tax incentives reduce energy consumption - if effectively implemented
By studying the effects of Basel's electricity levy, researchers at the University of Lucerne investigated how tax incentives work in practice and how their impact on energy consumption could be increased. The National Council and the Council of States decided not to debate the proposals of the Federal Council on the second phase of the Energy Strategy 2050 concerning the climate and energy tax incentive KELS.

Physics - Electroengineering - 08.10.2018
Study opens route to flexible electronics made from exotic materials
Study opens route to flexible electronics made from exotic materials
Cost-effective method produces semiconducting films from materials that outperform silicon. The vast majority of computing devices today are made from silicon, the second most abundant element on Earth, after oxygen. Silicon can be found in various forms in rocks, clay, sand, and soil. And while it is not the best semiconducting material that exists on the planet, it is by far the most readily available.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.09.2018
Small modulator for big data
Conventional lithium niobite modulators, the longtime workhorse of the optoelectronic industry, may soon go the way of the vacuum tube and floppy disc. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a new method to fabricate and design integrated, on-chip modulators 100 times smaller and 20 times more efficient than current lithium niobite (LN) modulators.

Physics - Electroengineering - 10.09.2018
Diamond dust enables low-cost, high-efficiency magnetic field detection
Diamond dust enables low-cost, high-efficiency magnetic field detection
Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to print (Opens in new window) UC Berkeley engineers have created a device that dramatically reduces the energy needed to power magnetic field detectors, which could revolutionize how we measure the magnetic fields that flow through our electronics, our planet and even our bodies.

Environment - Electroengineering - 06.09.2018
Adding power choices reduces cost and risk of carbon-free electricity
Adding power choices reduces cost and risk of carbon-free electricity
To curb greenhouse gas emissions, nations, states, and cities should aim for a mix of fuel-saving, flexible, and highly reliable sources. In major legislation passed at the end of August, California committed to creating a 100 percent carbon-free electricity grid - once again leading other nations, states, and cities in setting aggressive policies for slashing greenhouse gas emissions.
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