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Environment - Earth Sciences - 15:34
The Arctic’s changing landscape: Impact on plants, animals, livelihoods and global temperatures
With 2019 on track to be one of the warmest years on record, a major new study reveals the impact of warming temperatures on Arctic vegetation, animal species, and human communities who rely on the stability of the Arctic food chain to survive. The study, published today in Science Advances by an international team of researchers, reports that the Arctic has warmed by 0.75į Celsius in the last decade.

Environment - 12:05
Reduced soil tilling helps both soils and yields
By monitoring crops through machine learning and satellite data, Stanford scientists have found farms that till the soil less can increase yields of corn and soybeans and improve the health of the soil - a win-win for meeting growing food needs worldwide. Agriculture degrades over 24 million acres of fertile soil every year, raising concerns about meeting the rising global demand for food.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.12.2019
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research. A team led by Oregon State University and including Imperial College London scientists found that sensitivity to forest fragmentation - the breakup of forests by human activities like logging or farming - increased six-fold at low versus high latitudes, putting tropical species at greater risk of extinction.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 05.12.2019
Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming - study
Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming - study
Greenhouse gas emissions released directly from the movement of volcanic rocks are capable of creating massive global warming effects - a discovery which could transform the way scientists predict climate change, a new study reveals. Scientists' calculations based on how carbon-based greenhouse gas levels link to movements of magma just below earth's surface suggest that such geological change has caused the largest temporary global warming of the past 65 million years.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.12.2019
Hybrids increase fish biodiversity in lakes of East Africa
Hybrids increase fish biodiversity in lakes of East Africa
When two individuals from different species mate, the offspring is known as a hybrid. As a result of the genomes being mixed, sometimes phenotypes are produced that deal with new environmental conditions better than the two parent species. Very often, hybrids are not able to reproduce, but there are quite a number of exceptions to this, including the cichlids.

Environment - 04.12.2019
Tracking power plant emissions in real time
Tracking power plant emissions in real time
Stanford scientists have developed a precise way to measure U.S. power plant emissions 24/7. The new tool will enable grid operators and big electricity consumers to reduce their carbon footprint in real time. About 30 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions come from power plants that generate electricity by burning fossil fuels.

Environment - Physics - 04.12.2019
Early climate modelers got global warming right, new report finds
Climate skeptics have long raised doubts about the accuracy of computer models that predict global warming, but it turns out that most of the early climate models were spot-on, according to a look-back by climate scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and NASA.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 04.12.2019
Better wildfire and smoke predictions with new vegetation database
This animation shows the average amount of wildfire fuels across the country for five different types of vegetation: trees, coarse wood debris, duff (decomposing organic materials on the ground), herbaceous live vegetation and shrubs. Michael Billmire/Michigan Technological University It's hard to find a place in the U.S. that isn't impacted by wildfires and smoke.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 04.12.2019
Reef copes with rapid sea-level rise
Reef copes with rapid sea-level rise
PhD student Kelsey Sanborn has shown how the reef has dealt with environmental stresses in the recent past in order to understand how it might react to climate change in the future. A new study into the recent history of the Great Barrier Reef has shown how it responds to rapid sea-level rise and other environmental stresses.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.12.2019
For some corals, meals can come with a side of microplastics
Under a black light, fluorescent green microplastics are seen in the water during a small demonstration experiment. In the 2018 experiment described in the paper, cauliflower coral (above) ingested microplastics when prey was also present in the water, but avoided eating microplastics when no prey was there.

Environment - 03.12.2019
Underground answers
As the world waxes warmer, scientists are scrambling to prioritize conservation efforts. A new global study of earthworm diversity suggests looking at soil, as climate change could seriously affect earthworms and the many functions they provide. Based on data compiled from 6,928 sites in 57 countries (including over 100 sites sampled by University of Minnesota researcher†and study coauthor Adrian Wackett), the work reveals that climate variables-temperature and especially precipitation-influence earthworm distributions and diversity far more than the properties of the soils they inhabit.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.12.2019
Reveals climate change impact on Antarctic penguins | University of Oxford
Reveals climate change impact on Antarctic penguins | University of Oxford
Antarctic†penguins have been on the†forefront†of†climate change,†experiencing massive changes to their natural habitat as the world's temperatures and human activity in the region have increased. Now, new research has revealed how†penguins have dealt with more than a century of human impacts in Antarctica and why some species are winners or losers in this rapidly changing ecosystem.

Chemistry - Environment - 02.12.2019
New membrane technology to boost water purification and energy storage
New membrane technology to boost water purification and energy storage
Imperial College London scientists have created a new type of membrane that could improve water purification and battery energy storage efforts. The new approach to ion exchange membrane design, which is published today , uses low-cost plastic membranes with many tiny hydrophilic (‘water-attracting') pores.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.12.2019
Genomic gymnastics help sorghum plant survive drought
A new study led by UC Berkeley researchers reveals how sorghum crops alter the expression of their genes to adapt to drought conditions. Understanding how sorghum survives harsh conditions could help researchers design crops that are more resilient to climate change. (UC Berkeley photo by Peggy Lemaux) Scorching temperatures and parched earth are no match for the sorghum plant - this cereal crop, native to Africa and Australia, will remain green and productive, even under conditions that would render other plants brown, brittle and barren.

Environment - 02.12.2019
Many pregnancies are shorter as climate change causes more 90-degree days
A UCLA study suggests that climate change is causing many women to have shorter pregnancies than they would normally, which could pose risks for infant health and child development. According to research published today , birth rates were 5% higher on days when the temperature exceeded 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

Environment - Social Sciences - 02.12.2019
Improved health check for running waters
If one turns a stone over in a river or stream, it swarms with tiny animals: caddisflies, water beetles, freshwater shrimp, and snails. The invertebrates living on the beds of water bodies that can be seen with the naked eye, called macroinvertebrates, are rather unimposing, but for science and the protection of surface waters they are of great importance.

Environment - Politics - 02.12.2019
What's driving erosion worldwide?
What’s driving erosion worldwide?
ETH Zurich researchers are reexamining the causes of soil erosion around the world - and have found that countries themselves have a surprisingly strong influence on their soil. This country effect was previously undetected. Soil erosion is a global problem that threatens food security and the functioning of ecosystems.

Environment - Music - 29.11.2019
Sounds of the past give new hope for coral reef restoration
Sounds of the past give new hope for coral reef restoration
An international team of scientists from the UK's Universities of Exeter and Bristol, and Australia's James Cook University and Australian Institute of Marine Science, say this "acoustic enrichment" could be a valuable tool in helping to restore damaged coral reefs. Working on Australia's recently devastated Great Barrier Reef, the scientists placed underwater loudspeakers playing healthy reef recordings in patches of dead coral and found twice as many fish arrived - and stayed - compared to equivalent patches where no sound was played.

Veterinary Science - Environment - 28.11.2019
Unique sledge dogs helped the Inuit thrive in the North American Arctic
A unique group of dogs helped the Inuit conquer the tough terrain of the North American Arctic, a major new analysis of the remains of hundreds of animals shows. The results of a major new study on the remains of Artic sledge dogs reveals that the Inuit brought specialised dogs with them when they migrated from Siberia over the Bering Strait into North America.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.11.2019
Neonicotinoids: despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk
Neonicotinoids: despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk
Since 2013, a European Union (EU) moratorium has restricted the application of three neonicotinoids to crops that attract bees because of the harmful effects they are deemed to have on these insects. Yet researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the Institut de l'Abeille (ITSAP) have just demonstrated that residues of these insecticides-and especially of imidacloprid-can still be detected in rape nectar from 48% of the plots of studied fields, their concentrations varying greatly over the years.
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