news

« BACK

Environment



Results 1 - 20 of 5075.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 254 Next »


Environment - Earth Sciences - 27.09.2022
Seawater could have provided phosphorous required for emerging life
Seawater could have provided phosphorous required for emerging life
The problem of how phosphorus became a universal ingredient for life on Earth may have been solved by researchers from the University of Cambridge and the University of Cape Town, who have recreated primordial seawater containing the element in the lab.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.09.2022
Scientists estimate more than half of palm species may be threatened with extinction
Scientists estimate more than half of palm species may be threatened with extinction
An international team of biologists, including W. Daniel Kissling of the University of Amsterdam, has used artificial intelligence techniques to estimate the conservation status of nearly 1900 palm species across the world. They found that more than 1000 of the species may be at risk of extinction.

Environment - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Ancient footprints on UK beach record demise of a biodiversity hotspot
A team of archaeologists and geographers from The University of Manchester have discovered that hundreds of ancient animal and human footprints found on a beach in Merseyside record a major decline in large animal diversity in Ancient Britain. Their new research, published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution , includes a new programme of radiocarbon dating which shows that the most species-rich footprint beds at Formby Point are much older than previously thought.

Environment - 26.09.2022
Researchers question artificial grass in urban parks because although it saves water, it reduces the number of birds
Researchers question artificial grass in urban parks because although it saves water, it reduces the number of birds
Researchers from the Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology of the University of Valencia show that replacing natural grass with artificial grass has reduced the number of birds by 35. In a study published in the journal Bird Conservation International , in which 45 parks in 18 cities have been analysed, they warn of the loss of biodiversity as a result of this practice.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.09.2022
Alpine plants respond to climate change
Alpine plants respond to climate change
Researchers from ETH Zurich are studying how alpine vegetation is responding to a warming climate - and how some plant communities are continuing to stand firm against newcomers from lower elevations. A glance down the vertiginous slope is enough to create a dizzying sensation of being airborne. Far below is the city of Chur, with tiny cars beetling among toy houses.

Environment - 26.09.2022
Early modern humans in Africa used high-tech adhesives extracted from a local conifer
Early modern humans in Africa used high-tech adhesives extracted from a local conifer
The second option is more difficult and time consuming. In it, the leaves have to be heated in a kind of underground distillery for several hours, so that the tar drips into a container. It is not known which method was used. Either way, says Schmidt, it was astonishing that early modern humans at that time did not use any plants other than yellowwoods as sources of glue.

Environment - Materials Science - 26.09.2022
Engineers build a battery-free, wireless underwater camera
Engineers build a battery-free, wireless underwater camera
The device could help scientists explore unknown regions of the ocean, track pollution, or monitor the effects of climate change. Scientists estimate that more than 95 percent of Earth's oceans have never been observed, which means we have seen less of our planet's ocean than we have the far side of the moon or the surface of Mars.

Health - Environment - 26.09.2022
Heat-related mortality risk is widespread across Washington state
Heat-related deaths are an issue across Washington state, and they occur even in regions that typically have milder climates, according to a University of Washington study published Aug. 30 in the journal Atmosphere. This is the most extensive study yet of heat-related mortality in Washington state, and the first to look beyond the major population centers to include rural areas.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.09.2022
Aquatic insects are less likely to be invasive
Aquatic insects are less likely to be invasive
Insects that live entirely or partly in freshwater have a much lower proportion of invasive species than insects that live on land. This is shown in a study by the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL in collaboration with the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology Eawag and an international team of researchers.

Chemistry - Environment - 22.09.2022
Green hydrogen at sea cheaper and more sustainable
Green hydrogen at sea cheaper and more sustainable
Researchers from Wageningen University & Research have shown that the production costs of green hydrogen via electrolysis at sea can be reduced by making Ultra-Pure Water (UPW) on site by means of membrane distillation.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.09.2022
Zebrafish change their sex in warm water
Zebrafish change their sex in warm water
Research team led by Göttingen University identify DNA -hotspots- that tell zebrafish to change sex in warmer waters. Environment leaves its mark on genome through DNA methylation. In many species, such as zebrafish, sex is partly or completely determined by the environment. Genes can predispose to a particular sex but may be -overruled- by the influence of the environment, for example temperature or population density.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 22.09.2022
How global warming affects astronomical observations
How global warming affects astronomical observations
Astronomical observations from ground-based telescopes are sensitive to local atmospheric conditions. Anthropogenic climate change will negatively affect some of these conditions at observation sites around the globe, as a team of researchers led by the University of Bern and the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS report.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.09.2022
How nanoplastics enter the aquatic food web
How nanoplastics enter the aquatic food web
The smallest of all plastic particles have remained largely unexplored until now, because they could not be detected in the environment. Now researchers at Eawag show: Nanoplastics stick to slimy biofilms, which can for example be found on stones in streams or rivers. When freshwater snails feed on the slime, the nanoplastics are taken up.

Environment - History / Archeology - 22.09.2022
Past climate of Cape Town revealed in study
New insights into the history of South Africa's climate have been revealed. In a project that spanned seven years, the Tracing History Trust, with support from Cardiff University and Wits University, has digitised and transcribed the Dutch East India Company's day registers which were written between 1652 to 1791.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.09.2022
Termites may have a larger role in future ecosystems
Most people think termites are a nuisance that consume wood in homes and businesses. But those termites represent less than 4% of all termite species worldwide. Termites are critical in natural ecosystems-especially in the tropics-because they help recycle dead wood from trees. Without such decayers, the world would be piled high with dead plants and animals.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.09.2022
Rising sea temperatures threaten Atlantic populations of Bulwer's petrels
Rising sea temperatures threaten Atlantic populations of Bulwer’s petrels
The impact of the rise in sea temperatures predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) could affect the survival of the North Atlantic populations of Bulwer's petrel in the Azores, Canary Islands and Cape Verde, according to a study conducted by the Seabird Ecology Group of the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute ( IRBio ) of the University of Barcelona.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.09.2022
Improved air quality accelerates global warming in recent decades
Improved air quality accelerates global warming in recent decades
An international research team led by Leipzig University has used satellite data to demonstrate that concentrations of pollutant particles have decreased significantly since the year 2000. This is necessary due to their impact on health. But it is also of great significance for another reason, since it has reduced the particles- cooling effect on the climate.

Environment - 21.09.2022
Climate models unreliable in predicting damage to coral reefs
Climate models are unreliable when it comes to predicting the damage that tropical cyclones will do to sensitive coral reefs, according to a new study published in the journal Earth's Future. With the expectation that tropical cyclones will increase in intensity with climate change, there has been interest among conservationists to use the models to identify the vulnerability of reef communities to storm damage, and to target conservation and protection efforts at those coral reefs that are less likely to be impacted by climate change.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.09.2022
Tropical soils 'highly sensitive' to global warming
Tropical soils ’highly sensitive’ to global warming
Global warming is likely to cause a decline in the number of species of microbes that live in tropical soils - and that could threaten the biodiversity of rainforests and increase carbon emissions. In a new study, scientists - led by Dr Andrew Nottingham from the School of Geography at Leeds - say evidence indicates that tropical soils are "highly sensitive" to an increase in temperature.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.09.2022
Plastic and debris in Arctic fox poo in Iceland
Plastic and debris in Arctic fox poo in Iceland
Recently, researchers associated with Wageningen Marine Research published an article in the scientific journal Polar Biology, where they discuss anthropogenic debris in Arctic fox faeces from Iceland. Samples from different decennia show that plastic has been ingested since the 1990's but that frequencies of such uptake are low.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 254 Next »