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Earth Sciences - Environment - 25.06.2019
Shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea
The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography. The European Research Council-funded expedition on board the RSS Discovery took place during the summer of 2017.

Materials Science - Environment - 25.06.2019
Researchers pioneer method to purify water using solar energy
As the global population grows, fresh water supplies are more precious than ever. While scientists and engineers know how to purify water, making those methods sustainable and energy efficient is another question. One promising approach is solar-driven distillation, or solar steam generation, which can help us get fresh water from wastewater or seawater.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 25.06.2019
Engineering heat out of metro tunnels
Engineering heat out of metro tunnels
Researchers at EPFL have precisely quantified convection heat transfer in rail tunnels. Using the new model, they estimated how much energy Lausanne could save by fitting the future M3 metro line with a geothermal heat-recovery system, in what would be a world first. Heat transfer happens in various ways in rail tunnels.

Environment - 24.06.2019
Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt
Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt
New research led by climate scientists from the University of Bristol suggests that the representation of clouds in climate models is as, or more, important than the amount of greenhouse gas emissions when it comes to projecting future Greenland ice sheet melt. Recent research shows that the whole of the Greenland ice sheet could be gone within the next thousand years, raising global sea level by more than seven metres.

Environment - Social Sciences - 24.06.2019
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Methods from 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new Imperial College London research. Nestled between the Pacific Ocean and the Andes mountains , the people of Peru 's coastal region rely on surface water from the Andes for drinking water, industry, and animal and crop farming.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.06.2019
Scientists Hit Pay Dirt with New Microbial Research Technique
Scientists Hit Pay Dirt with New Microbial Research Technique
A better method for studying microbes in the soil will help scientists understand large-scale environmental cycles Long ago, during the European Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci wrote that we humans "know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot." Five hundred years and innumerable technological and scientific advances later, his sentiment still holds true.

Materials Science - Environment - 21.06.2019
Perovskite solar cells tested for real-world performance - in the lab
Perovskite solar cells tested for real-world performance - in the lab
Researchers bring diurnal and seasonal variations into the lab to test the performance of perovskite solar cells under realistic conditions. It was only ten years ago that metal-halide perovskites were discovered to be photovoltaic materials. Today, perovskite solar cells made are almost as efficient as the best conventional silicon ones, and there is much hope that they will become a highly efficient and low-cost alternative, as they can be manufactured by rather simple and fast methods like printing.

Health - Environment - 21.06.2019
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
Researchers have found no link between exposure to emissions from municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) and infant deaths or reduced foetal growth. However, they show living closer to the incinerators themselves is associated with a very small increase in the risk of some birth defects, compared to the general population.

Environment - 20.06.2019
Heat kills invasive jumping worm cocoons, could help limit spread
New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum shows that temperatures of about 100 degrees Fahrenheit kill the cocoons of invasive jumping worms. That's good news for ecologists and horticulturalists who are working to slow or stop the spread of the worms, which can damage the soils they invade.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Software to protect the world's most endangered species
Software to protect the world's most endangered species
By combining genetic and environmental databases, researchers at EPFL are seeking to help biologists identify more accurately the animal and plant species most exposed to climate change, in order to develop appropriate conservation methods. Northern Morocco is home to a type of sheep that has a specific gene, developed over thousands of years of evolution.

Environment - Transport - 20.06.2019
Record efficiency for a gas engine
Record efficiency for a gas engine
At the end of May, the final meeting of the "Horizon 2020" project "GasOn" with the EU Commission took place in Brussels. The aim of this EU project was the further development of gas engines for cars and vans. Around 20 partners participated, including ETH Zurich and Empa as well as four European automobile manufacturers and well-known suppliers.

Environment - Life Sciences - 19.06.2019
Deep submersible dives shed light on rarely explored coral reefs
Deep submersible dives shed light on rarely explored coral reefs
Just beyond where conventional scuba divers can go is an area of the ocean that still is largely unexplored. In waters this deep - about 100 to at least 500 feet below the surface - little to no light breaks through. Researchers must rely on submersible watercraft or sophisticated diving equipment to be able to study ocean life at these depths, known as the mesophotic zone.

Environment - 19.06.2019
What role can households play in the energy transition?
What role can households play in the energy transition?
Researchers set up the ENERGISE project designed to help households reduce their energy consumption without compromising their levels of comfort. What role can households play in the energy transition? Can changes to everyday practices make a difference? The European ENERGISE project, led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE), in Switzerland, carried out an experiment to reduce energy consumption in 300 households in eight countries.

Environment - Chemistry - 17.06.2019
Wheat myth comes a cropper
The myth that modern wheat varieties are more heavily reliant on pesticides and fertilisers than older varieties has been debunked by new research. The University of Queensland 's Dr Kai Voss-Fels said modern wheat varieties have out-performed older varieties in side-by-side field trials under both optimum and harsh growing conditions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.06.2019
What drives Yellowstone’s massive elk migrations?
Yellowstone's migrating elk use climate cues, like melting snow and greening grasses, to decide when to make the trek from their winter ranges in prairies and valleys to their summer ranges in high mountain plateaus. (Joe Riis photo) Every spring, tens of thousands of elk follow a wave of green growth up onto the high plateaus in and around Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks, where they spend the summer calving and fattening on fresh grass.

Chemistry - Environment - 13.06.2019
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Chemists at EPFL have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials. The carbon dioxide (CO2) produced when fossil fuels are burned is normally released into the atmosphere. Researchers working on synthetic fuels - also known as carbon-neutral fuels - are exploring ways to capture and recycle that CO2.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 13.06.2019
Carbon-neutral fuel made from sunlight and air
Researchers from ETH Zurich have developed a novel technology that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. For the first time worldwide they demonstrate the entire thermochemical process chain under real field conditions. The new solar mini-refinery is located on the roof of ETH's Machine Laboratory building in Zurich.

Environment - Politics - 12.06.2019
Does climate change cause armed conflict?
A new study finds that climate has affected the risk of armed conflict. Though other drivers of violence were found to be substantially more influential, as global temperatures continue to rise, the changing climate is expected to further amplify the risk of conflict. Can a changing climate trigger organised armed conflict, such as civil war, or make it more severe?

Environment - 12.06.2019
SMOS joins forces with top weather forecasting system
SMOS joins forces with top weather forecasting system
As of yesterday, 11 June 2019, measurements from ESA's SMOS mission are being fully integrated into ECMWF's forecasting system, allowing for a more accurate description of water content in soil. Since its launch in 2009, ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission has been providing global observations of emissions from Earth's surface, particularly soil moisture and ocean salinity - two important variables in the water cycle.

Politics - Environment - 12.06.2019
Does climate change cause armed conflict?
Does climate change cause armed conflict?
As global temperatures climb, the risk of armed conflict is expected to increase substantially, according to experts across several fields. Intensifying climate change will increase the future risk of violent armed conflict within countries, according to a study published today in the journal Nature.
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