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Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.07.2024 - Today
The dawn of the Antarctic ice sheets
For the first time, the recovery of unique geological samples combined with sophisticated modelling provides surprising insights into when and where today's Antarctic ice sheet formed. In recent years global warming has left its mark on the Antarctic ice sheets. The "eternal" ice in Antarctica is melting faster than previously assumed, particularly in West Antarctica more than East Antarctica.

History / Archeology - Environment - 16.07.2024 - Today
Water scarcity drove steam power adoption during Industrial Revolution
Water scarcity drove steam power adoption during Industrial Revolution, new research suggests A groundbreaking new reconstruction of 19th-century Britain's water resources has revealed how limited access to waterpower during the Industrial Revolution helped drive the adoption of steam engines in Greater Manchester's Cottonopolis.

Environment - 16.07.2024 - Today
How AI can help identify bees exposed to pesticides
Researchers at INRAE and the National Autonomous University of Mexico have combined flight activity data for honey bees with AI modelling to create a high performing toxicovigilance tool. The results of their study, published in Ecological Informatics, confirm that the tool can alert users to risks to honey bee populations caused by exposure to neurotoxic pesticides.

Environment - Innovation - 16.07.2024 - Today
New CMU Tool Monitors Wildlife Conservation in Low-Resource Languages
Activists on the front lines of wildlife conservation routinely monitor news articles for information about infrastructure projects that could threaten at-risk animals. But that monitoring required more staff time than organizations on the ground could spare. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University helped ease this burden by working with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) for Nature to develop a tool that monitors and identifies media articles related to environmental conservation.

Astronomy / Space - Environment - 15.07.2024
How climate change is altering the Earth’s rotation
When the Earth's ice masses melt, the way the planet rotates also changes. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now been able to show how climate change is altering the Earth's axis of rotation and the length of the day. The speed of rotation, which was hitherto mainly influenced by the moon, will now also depend much more on the climate.

Environment - Social Sciences - 15.07.2024
Land protection initiatives reduced Amazon deforestation by up to 83%
A new analysis shows that land protection initiatives in the Brazilian Legal Amazon (BLA) reduced deforestation by up to 83% between 2000 and 2010. Such impressive results highlight the vital role of land protection policies in achieving ambitious goals, including the UN biodiversity target to protect 30% of the planet's surface by 2030 .

Environment - 15.07.2024
The stirring of the deep waters of Lake Geneva revealed
The stirring of the deep waters of Lake Geneva revealed
Researchers discovered that deepwater renewal in Lake Geneva in wintertime is not only due to vertical mixing. Instead, strong currents coming from the lake's Petit Lac basin and nearshore zones of the Grand Lac play a vital role. In temperate lakes, deep vertical mixing, known as turnover, happens during winter.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.07.2024
How Plant Cold Specialists Can Adapt to the Environment
How Plant Cold Specialists Can Adapt to the Environment
International team of evolutionary biologists investigate genomic underpinnings for the adaptive potential of spoonworts Plant cold specialists like the spoonworts have adapted well to the cold climates of the Ice Ages. As cold and warm periods alternated, they developed a number of species that also resulted in a proliferation of the genome.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.07.2024
Even fish society shows social control and nepotism
Even fish society shows social control and nepotism
Cichlids living in groups tend to turn a blind eye to their relatives shirking their duty to help as desired in various tasks in the group, such as caring for the brood. Animals that are not related to them don't seem to be offered the same lenient treatment. Researchers at the University of Bern have now been able to prove the existence of this form of "nepotism" in fish for the first time in experiments.

Environment - Architecture - 11.07.2024
Designing a decision-support tool for climate adaptive urban planning
Designing a decision-support tool for climate adaptive urban planning
Heat stress and air pollution ravages cities more and more. In a new Horizon Europe project, researchers will develop a digital twin that supports decision makers to design resilient urban areas that can cope with the changing climate. Researchers from TU Delft and 18 other partners receive the Horizon Europe grant for their project called UrbanAIR.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.07.2024
A motor for cell-free metabolism
A motor for cell-free metabolism
Researchers have developed the first cell-free system in which genetic information and metabolism work together Metabolic processes outside living cells only continue as long as they are supplied with building blocks from the outside. A team of Max Planck researchers led by Tobias Erb has now developed the first in vitro system inspired by nature that couples genetics and metabolism and can drive itself.

Environment - Health - 11.07.2024
Health risks in switching ships from diesel to ammonia fuel
Ammonia could be a nearly carbon-free maritime fuel, but without new emissions regulations, its impact on air quality could significantly impact human health. As container ships the size of city blocks cross the oceans to deliver cargo, their huge diesel engines emit large quantities of air pollutants that drive climate change and have human health impacts.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.07.2024
Mozambican Woodlands could store more than double the carbon previously estimated
Mozambican Woodlands could store more than double the carbon previously estimated
The capacity of Mozambican woodlands to capture and store carbon is underestimated and potentially undervalued for their protection and restoration, finds new research from an international team of scientists including UCL researchers. The research, led by carbon data provider Sylvera and published in Nature Communications Earth & Environment , found that miombo woodlands, which span large areas of Sub-Saharan Africa, store 1.5 to 2.2 times more carbon than had previously been estimated by standard methods.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.07.2024
Wolves’ return has had only small impact on deer populations in NE Washington
Humans drove wolves to extinction in Washington state around the 1930s. Thanks to conservation efforts, by about 80 years later, wolves had returned - crossing first from the Canadian border into Washington around 2008 and later entering the state from Idaho. Since then, wolf numbers in Washington have been steadily growing, raising questions about what the return of this large predator species means for ecosystems and people alike.

Astronomy / Space - Environment - 10.07.2024
Cool exoplanet reveals missing link between hot Jupiters and cold solar system planets
Research into a rare planet is revealing the link between hot Jupiter-sized exoplanets and cold solar system giants like Saturn. Astronomers searching for exoplanets (planets outside of our solar system) have investigated a Saturn-sized body around a Sun-like star, 490 lightyears from Earth. The research, led by The University of Warwick in collaboration with other global institutions, focused on a transiting exoplanet called TOI-2447 b, which is much cooler and further away from its host star than most known exoplanets.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 10.07.2024
The formation of the Antarctic ice floes
The formation of the Antarctic ice floes
An international research team led by Silvia Spezzaferri from the University of Freiburg has discovered why the Antarctic polar ice cap is melting faster on the western side of the continent than on the eastern side. New drillings and sophisticated modeling have shown that this phenomenon can be traced back to the original formation of the ice sheet 34 million years ago .

Environment - 10.07.2024
Rising sea levels spell danger for shorebirds such as oystercatcher
Research by James Cook University in Australia involving Radboud scientists shows that rising sea levels will drastically reduce the number of shorebirds in Europe. The number of oystercatchers on three Waddeneilanden will decline an additional 56 to 79 percent over the next 100 years due to sea level rise.

Environment - Veterinary - 10.07.2024
Vet med researchers continue important work with Stampede on animal safety
Vet med researchers continue important work with Stampede on animal safety
News media tour W.A. Ranches before 'largest outdoor rodeo' to learn more about ongoing research projects A long-standing collaboration between the Calgary Stampede and UCalgary's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (UCVM) aims to improve animal welfare and inform policies that create a safer environment for both animals and people at the well-known outdoor rodeo.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 10.07.2024
The Gulf Stream is wind-powered and could weaken from climate change
The Gulf Stream is wind-powered and could weaken from climate change
New evidence of changes to the Gulf Stream during the last ice age could indicate additional sensitivity to future climatic changes, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in Nature, found that during the last ice age about 20,000 years ago, the Gulf Stream was stronger than today because of more powerful winds across the subtropical North Atlantic.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 09.07.2024
In the heart of the volcano: when a scientific expedition goes off the rails
In the heart of the volcano: when a scientific expedition goes off the rails
In early 2024, geophysicist Corentin Caudron plans to travel to Costa Rica to study the activities of the Pos volcano, by measuring sound emissions in the lake that fills its crater. He was to join a 20-strong team and bring back crucial data for volcano monitoring. But nature decided otherwise. An article published in The Conversation.
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