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Environment - Politics - 06.06.2024
Each individual’s social support for climate change promotes climate policies
According to a study by UC3M and the Elcano Institute The individual pressure that each person can exert to combat climate change has a significant effect on their environment to promote green behaviour. This is one of the conclusions of a scientific study by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Elcano Royal Institute for International and Strategic Studies that analyses the socio-political factors that influence the acceptance of climate policies in Spain.

Environment - 06.06.2024
Digital Twins and Nanotechnology Can Transform Agriculture
Carnegie Mellon researchers have developed an approach to increase crop yield and efficiency by making plants more resilient against disease and harmful environmental factors. In a world where agriculture accounts for 14%-28% of global greenhouse gas emissions and 70% of all freshwater withdraws, it is impossible to ignore that current agricultural practices are unsustainable.

Health - Environment - 06.06.2024
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wastewater
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wastewater
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a threat to health worldwide. This makes it all the more important not only to track their spread, but also to recognise trends. Over the course of a year, researchers have analysed wastewater from six wastewater treatment plants in Switzerland for the spread of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.06.2024
Tracking the Climate With the Help of Blue-Green Algae
Tracking the Climate With the Help of Blue-Green Algae
Led by the University of Bremen, RWTH paleoclimate researcher Professor Thorsten Bauersachs and colleagues have now published their results on the glaciation of West Antarctica in the journal Science Advances. It has been more than 30 million years since West Antarctica was last largely ice-free. In the last 30 million years, however, it has been extensively glaciated.

Life Sciences - Environment - 06.06.2024
First Week after Birth Is Critical for Development of Senses
Researchers at UZH have found that the maturation of the senses for smell and touch is closely linked in mice and that this strong interaction takes place within a narrow developmental time window. These findings not only underline the importance of environmental stimuli for brain assembly in early life, but also the interdependent development of the senses.

Life Sciences - Environment - 06.06.2024
Fish out of water: How killifish embryos adapted their development
Fish out of water: How killifish embryos adapted their development
The annual killifish lives in regions with extreme drought. A research group at the University of Basel now reports in "Science" that the early embryogenesis of killifish diverges from that of other species. Unlike other fish, their body structure is not predetermined from the outset. This could enable the species to survive dry periods unscathed.

Environment - 05.06.2024
Electrified charcoal 'sponge' can soak up CO2 directly from the air
Electrified charcoal ’sponge’ can soak up CO2 directly from the air
Researchers have developed a low-cost, energy-efficient method for making materials that can capture carbon dioxide directly from the air. The first and most urgent thing we've got to do is reduce carbon emissions worldwide, but greenhouse gas removal is also thought to be necessary to achieve net zero emissions and limit the worst effects of climate change.

Environment - 05.06.2024
Global change fires reduce the abundance and diversity of woody plants
The team at the Desertification Research Centre (CIDE, UV-CSIC-GVA) has carried out the first global, systematic and quantitative study on the effects of changes in fire regime on vegetation. The results show that intensified fire regimes reduce woody plants abundance, diversity and fitness, especially in conifer forests.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 05.06.2024
Uptake of tire wear additives by vegetables grown for human consumption
Uptake of tire wear additives by vegetables grown for human consumption
Irrigation with treated wastewater and sewage sludge brings tire additives into the leafy vegetables Car tires contain hundreds of chemical additives that can leach out of them. This is how they end up in crops and subsequently in the food chain. Researchers at the Center for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science at the University of Vienna and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have now detected these chemical residues in leafy vegetables for the first time.

Environment - 05.06.2024
Fires caused by global change reduce the abundance and diversity of woody plants
The team at the Desertification Research Centre (CIDE, UV-CSIC-GVA) has carried out the first global, systematic and quantitative study on the effects of changes in fire regime on vegetation. The results show that intensified fire regimes reduce woody plants abundance, diversity and fitness, especially in conifer forests.

Environment - 04.06.2024
Bloody insights: organs-on-chip ready to help snake venom research
Bloody insights: organs-on-chip ready to help snake venom research
A 3D model of imitation blood vessels will make it possible to see exactly how snake venom attacks blood vessels, without having to use laboratory animals. This new research model, called an organ-on-a-chip, was developed by a research team from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, MIMETAS and Naturalis Biodiversity Center.

Environment - 04.06.2024
Sustainable plastics are not a solution, researchers warn
With hundreds of millions of tonnes of plastic produced and used on a yearly basis, it's no surprise that people are looking for alternatives. Yet so-called 'sustainable plastics' are not a silver bullet, warn researchers Sara Gonella and Vincent de Gooyert from Radboud University. When looking at the full impact of these plastics, they are often not nearly as sustainable as they pretend to be, they argue.

Health - Environment - 04.06.2024
Dip your toes into forest bathing
Dip your toes into forest bathing
Immersing oneself in nature offers health benefits to adults and children alike. Here's how to get started. More than a thousand studies (and growing) show that time spent in nature can have a reset effect, washing away the anxieties and stresses of everyday life. A 2019 study published in Current Directions in Psychological Science , for instance, found that exposure to natural environments improves memory, cognitive flexibility, and attentional control, while a 2022 study published in Cities & Health found that walking in an urban park can improve mood.

Environment - Life Sciences - 04.06.2024
What environmental impact can a contraceptive molecule have?
What environmental impact can a contraceptive molecule have?
What environmental impact can a contraceptive molecule have? Recent work by UNamur researchers answers this question, and has just been published in the journal Environment International. This work is the fruit of a three-year collaboration with Mithra, a Belgian biotech company committed to transforming women's health with innovative alternatives, particularly in contraception, funded by SPW Research.

Environment - 03.06.2024
Thawing permafrost: not a ticking time bomb, but cause for urgent concern
Thawing permafrost: not a ticking time bomb, but cause for urgent concern
The thaw of permafrost is not a global climate 'tipping point'. That is the conclusion of an international group of scientists, including earth scientist Moritz Langer. Rather, permafrost soils are thawing along with global warming. "There is no safe margin within which the Earth can warm up, as a tipping point suggests." Permafrost soils store large amounts of organic carbon in the form of dead plant material.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.06.2024
Rainforest wildlife under threat as below-canopy temperatures rise
Rainforest wildlife under threat as below-canopy temperatures rise
Assumptions that tropical forest canopies protect from the effects of climate change are unfounded, say researchers. A severe risk is that species are no longer able to survive within tropical forests as climate change intensifies, further exacerbating the global extinction crisis and degrading rainforest carbon stocks.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 03.06.2024
Shape and depth of ocean floor profoundly influence how carbon is stored there
Shape and depth of ocean floor profoundly influence how carbon is stored there
New study finds seafloor topography accounts for up to 50% of the changes in depth at which carbon has been sequestered Science + Technology New study finds seafloor topography accounts for up to 50% of the changes in depth at which carbon has been sequestered Key takeaways The movement of carbon between the atmosphere, oceans and continents - or carbon cycle - regulates Earth's climate, with the ocean playing a major role in carbon sequestration.

Health - Environment - 03.06.2024
Not just a sneeze: Pollen increase blood pressure
An estimated one-fifth of the world's population is affected by pollen allergies. Researchers at Swiss TPH and the University of Basel have now discovered that a high concentration of pollen can increase blood pressure in allergy sufferers. It is estimated that around 20% of adults globally are allergic to pollen.

History / Archeology - Environment - 03.06.2024
Crucial shift in River Nile's evolution during ancient Egypt discovered
Crucial shift in River Nile’s evolution during ancient Egypt discovered
Researchers have explored how the River Nile evolved over the past 11,500 years and how changes in its geography could have helped shape the fortunes of ancient Egyptian civilisation. Research published in Nature Geoscience reveals a major shift in the Nile around four thousand years ago, after which the floodplain in the Nile Valley around Luxor greatly expanded.

Health - Environment - 31.05.2024
More than sneezing: Pollen increases blood pressure
More than sneezing: Pollen increases blood pressure
An estimated one-fifth of the world's population is affected by pollen allergies. Researchers at Swiss TPH have now discovered that high pollen concentrations can increase blood pressure in allergy sufferers. Pollen allergies are thus becoming a growing public health problem, especially as the pollen season is becoming longer and more intense due to climate change.