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Environment - 31.05.2024
Focus on cities will boost benefits of air pollution action for most vulnerable
Meeting UK air pollution targets by focussing on urban areas will maximise health benefits for the most deprived communities. A study led by Imperial College London researchers shows that reducing typically urban sources of fine-particle air pollution like roads, wood burners, and machinery would also reduce inequalities in how different communities suffer the health impacts.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.05.2024
Cuckoos evolve to look like their hosts - and form new species in the process
Cuckoos evolve to look like their hosts - and form new species in the process
Two decades of cuckoo research have helped scientists to explain how battles between species can cause new species to arise This exciting new finding could potentially apply to any pairs of species that are in battle with each other..the coevolutionary arms race could cause new species to emerge - and increase biodiversity on our planet Rebecca Kilner The theory of coevolution says that when closely interacting species drive evolutionary changes in each other this can lead to speciation - the evolution of new species.

Chemistry - Environment - 30.05.2024
New method makes hydrogen from solar power and agricultural waste†
University of Illinois Chicago engineers have helped design a new method to make hydrogen gas from water using only solar power and agricultural waste, such as manure or husks. The method reduces the energy needed to extract hydrogen from water by 600%, creating new opportunities for sustainable, climate-friendly chemical production.

Environment - Chemistry - 30.05.2024
'biodegradable' teabags don't readily degrade in the environment and can harm earthworms
’biodegradable’ teabags don’t readily degrade in the environment and can harm earthworms
Study says 'biodegradable' teabags don't readily degrade in the environment and can harm earthworms Researchers say labelling should be improved to make clear teabags shouldn't be thrown away in domestic compost heaps. Some teabags manufactured using plastic alternatives do not degrade in soil and have the potential to harm terrestrial species, a new study has shown.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 30.05.2024
Microscopic defects in ice influence how massive glaciers flow
Microscopic defects in ice influence how massive glaciers flow
The findings should help scientists refine predictions of future sea-level rise. As they seep and calve into the sea, melting glaciers and ice sheets are raising global water levels at unprecedented rates. To predict and prepare for future sea-level rise, scientists need a better understanding of how fast glaciers melt and what influences their flow.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.05.2024
Unexpected pockets of biodiversity pepper Los Angeles
Unexpected pockets of biodiversity pepper Los Angeles
But it will still be a challenge to elevate the overall level of biodiversity in the city Key takeaways UCLA researchers, in partnership with the city of Los Angeles, have developed the urban association index to help identify how well or poorly individual wildlife species are doing in the city. The researchers found unexpected pockets of biodiversity deep in the city, but they say it will still be a challenge to elevate Los Angeles' overall level of biodiversity.

Environment - Health - 29.05.2024
Health risk from global warming predictor of city climate action during COVID-19
Health risk from global warming predictor of city climate action during COVID-19
City officials were more likely to maintain climate action during the pandemic in places with more climate-related health issues affecting residents. Cities around the world were more likely to maintain climate action and enact 'green recovery' long-term plans after the pandemic if local decision-makers were more alert to the health risks of climate change, a new global study has shown.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 29.05.2024
Abandoned farmlands could play a role in fighting climate change. A new study shows exactly where they are
Abandoned farmlands could play a role in fighting climate change. A new study shows exactly where they are
Farmland is often a battleground in the fight against climate change. Solar panels and energy crops are pitted against food production, while well-intended policy choices can create incentives for farmers to till up new lands, releasing even more heat-trapping gas into the atmosphere. That's why strategies for sustainable plant-based fuels focus on marginal lands - fields that are too hard to cultivate or don't produce good enough yields to be considered profitable.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 28.05.2024
Volcanic ash reveals chaos-causing seaweed's journey
Volcanic ash reveals chaos-causing seaweed’s journey
Scientists have used volcanic ash and ocean models to track the journey of huge mats of seaweed floating across the Atlantic and causing chaos in the Caribbean. They found chemical traces of volcanic ash from the eruption of a volcano on St Vincent, in St Vincent and the Grenadines in the Caribbean, on sargassum seaweed that washed up four months later in Jamaica - 1,700 kilometres away.

Environment - Social Sciences - 28.05.2024
Fewer invasive species in natural areas of indigenous populations
Fewer invasive species in natural areas of indigenous populations
Sustainable land use as a key to combating alien species The introduction of plant and animal species into new regions by humans is increasing rapidly worldwide. Some of these non-native species have a massive impact as they upset the balance of ecosystems. It was previously unclear whether there are differences in the spread of such invasive species between areas cared for by indigenous populations and other regions.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.05.2024
Global activity of seafloor biodiversity mapped for the first time
Global activity of seafloor biodiversity mapped for the first time
A team of scientists from the USA and UK has used artificial intelligence (AI) to map the activities of seafloor invertebrate animals, such as worms, clams and shrimps, across all the oceans of the world. The research, led by Texas A&M University (USA) with investigators from the University of Southampton (UK) and Yale University (USA), combined large datasets, with machine learning techniques, to reveal the critical factors that support and maintain the health of marine ecosystems.

Environment - Health - 28.05.2024
Food swaps could cut greenhouse gas emissions from groceries by a quarter
Food swaps could cut greenhouse gas emissions from groceries by a quarter
A new study in Australia has shown that shoppers making simple food and drink switches could reduce greenhouse gas emissions from groceries by 26%. Researchers from The George Institute for Global Health and Imperial College London's School of Public Health conducted the most detailed analysis ever on the environmental impacts of a country's food buying behaviour.

Environment - Materials Science - 28.05.2024
Towards greener, more economical electric vehicles
Towards greener, more economical electric vehicles
Scientists at McGill University are uncovering revolutionary solutions for electric vehicle batteries, which could cut manufacturing costs by 20%. The global shift towards electric vehicles is gaining momentum, but extracting battery materials has major environmental consequences and high costs. Recently, two groundbreaking studies by scientists at McGill University have paved the way for the development of more economical and environmentally-friendly lithium-ion batteries - used in the manufacture of electric vehicles.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.05.2024
Better archiving of genetic data
Better archiving of genetic data
Every year, researchers upload vast amounts of genetic information to publicly accessible databases.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 27.05.2024
North Pacific humpback whale populations threatened by climate change
North Pacific humpback whale populations threatened by climate change
A long-term study of humpback whale populations in the North Pacific Ocean shows that climate change is having a negative impact on the species. Marine biologist JoŽlle De Weerdt of the VUB, founder of the non-profit organization ELI-S and co-author of the study, explains: 'Humpback whales have large, distinctive pectoral fins and a melodious song.

Environment - 24.05.2024
Ambitious targets are needed to end ocean plastic pollution by 2100
Research suggests that plastic pollution must be reduced by at least 5% every year to make progress towards UN targets by the end of the century. The study, a collaboration between researchers at Imperial College London and GNS Science, suggests that reducing plastic pollution by 5% per year would stabilize the level of microplastics - plastics less than 5 mm in length - in the surface oceans.

Astronomy / Space - Environment - 24.05.2024
Pre-collapse monitoring of Kakhovka Dam in Ukraine
Pre-collapse monitoring of Kakhovka Dam in Ukraine
New findings from a spaceborne monitoring team of University of Houston, TU Delft and DLR indicates the collapse of the Kakhovka Dam in Ukraine may have been already ongoing before the war with Russia, with deformations in the dam pre-dating the actual collapse. The results were published in the journal Nature Communications Earth and Environment this month.

History / Archeology - Environment - 23.05.2024
A rare find in Timorese mud may rewrite the history of human settlement in Australasia
A rare find in Timorese mud may rewrite the history of human settlement in Australasia
In The Conversation, Dr Ceri Shipton (UCL Institute of Archaeology) explores his new research that has found a large wave of migration reached the island of Timor not long after 50,000 years ago. Humans arrived in Australia at least† 65,000 years ago , according to archaeological evidence. These pioneers were part of an early wave of people travelling eastwards from Africa, through Eurasia, and ultimately into Australia and New Guinea.

Environment - 22.05.2024
Researchers propose use of electrical blackouts to determine impact of artificial light on wildlife
Researchers propose use of electrical blackouts to determine impact of artificial light on wildlife
New research proposes the use of electrical blackouts, such as those experienced during loadshedding in South Africa, to enhance our understanding of how artificial light in urban areas may be affecting wildlife behaviours. Artificial light at night, known as ALAN among urban ecologists, has become ubiquitous worldwide, with a notable increase in recent years.

Environment - 22.05.2024
Designing a better nest to help endangered turtles
Designing a better nest to help endangered turtles
With Ontario's eight species of turtles considered at risk, a new nest designed by researchers†has the potential to significantly bolster their struggling populations. The habitat is the first designed for turtles in rock barren landscapes, such as the research site around Georgian Bay. It uses moss and lichen.
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