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Health - Environment - 25.01.2024
Cold water swimming improves menopause symptoms
Menopausal women who regularly swim in cold water report significant improvements to their physical and mental symptoms, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in Post Reproductive Health , surveyed 1114 women, 785 of which were going through the menopause, to examine the effects of cold water swimming on their health and wellbeing.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.01.2024
How gases travel laterally through a lake
How gases travel laterally through a lake
At night or during cold winter days, lake water cools faster near the shore than in the middle of the lake. This creates a current that connects the shallow shore region with the deeper part of the lake. An international team led by researchers were able to show for the first time that this horizontal circulation transports gases such as oxygen and methane.

Environment - Physics - 25.01.2024
New tech could help reduce ecological impact of underwater noise pollution
A new system that harnesses the power of AI to accurately model how sound waves travel underwater could help reduce the impact of noise pollution on marine life. A new system that harnesses the power of AI to accurately model how sound waves travel underwater could help reduce the impact of noise pollution on marine life.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 25.01.2024
Centralised social networks potentially hinder innovation
Social systems where influence is centred around one or two individuals can lead to pack mentality and group think in farming communities, according to new research. Social systems where influence is focused around one or a few individuals may create environments where new ideas are ignored, and innovation is hindered.

Health - Environment - 25.01.2024
Heavy metals are toxic to ovaries, may lead to earlier menopause
Study: Heavy Metals and Trajectories of Anti-Müllerian Hormone During the Menopausal Transition Middle-aged women with elevated levels of heavy metals are more likely to have depleted ovarian function and egg reserves, which may lead to earlier arrival of menopause and its negative health effects, a new University of Michigan study shows.

Environment - 24.01.2024
Groundwater levels are sinking ever faster around the world
Groundwater levels are sinking ever faster around the world
A global study shows that the world's groundwater resources are dwindling: levels are falling sharply worldwide, and the decline has accelerated in the 21st century. Nevertheless, there is still reason for hope. At the beginning of November, The New York Times ran the headline, "America is using up its groundwater like there's no tomorrow." The journalists from the renowned media outlet had published an investigation into the state of groundwater reserves in the United States.

Social Sciences - Environment - 24.01.2024
Women have higher levels of performance and green behaviours in social economy organisations
Women have higher levels of performance and green behaviours in social economy organisations
A study by IDOCAL (Research Institute in Psychology of Human Resources, Organisational Development and Quality of Work Life) of the University of Valencia concludes that women have higher levels of performance and green behaviours in social economy organisations, especially in cooperatives.

Environment - 24.01.2024
Global groundwater levels declining rapidly, but they can recover
Global groundwater levels declining rapidly, but they can recover
Groundwater levels are declining at rapid and accelerating rates in numerous aquifers around the world, but the decline can be reversed in some cases, finds a new study involving researchers from University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), UCL and ETH Zürich. The research, published in Nature , analysed measurements taken over the last two decades from 170,000 wells in 1,693 aquifer systems across more than 40 countries.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 24.01.2024
Researchers advocate for sustainable logging to safeguard against global flood risks
Researchers advocate for sustainable logging to safeguard against global flood risks
It's time to recognize the power of healthy forests in managing global growing flood risk, and to shift towards more sustainable forestry practices and policy. This call is emphasized by UBC researchers in a peer-reviewed article published recently in the journal Science of the Total Environment . Dr. Younes Alila , a hydrologist and professor in the faculty of forestry, and his graduate student Henry Pham synthesized decades of hydrology studies and found that many "severely and consistently underestimated" the impact of forest cover on flood risk.

Health - Environment - 23.01.2024
Heat islands have an impact on health costs
Heat islands have an impact on health costs
A new study has produced the first cost estimate of the impact that urban heat islands have on human health. The study looked at 85 European cities over the course of three full years, meaning it also took into account the protection that heat islands offer in winter - an aspect that has been little studied until now.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.01.2024
Complex green organisms emerged a billion years ago
Complex green organisms emerged a billion years ago
Research team led by Göttingen University investigates the emergence of multicellularity Of all the organisms that photosynthesize, land plants have the most complex bodies. How did this morphology emerge? A team of scientists led by the University of Göttingen has taken a deep dive into the evolutionary history of morphological complexity in streptophytes , which include land plants and many green algae.

Chemistry - Environment - 22.01.2024
New sensor detects chemicals that impair thyroid gland
In a study conducted at the University of Twente, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and the Open University of Israel, researchers have developed a novel approach to address the environmental challenges posed by perchlorate salts, which have been identified as persistent pollutants with potential impacts on human health.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.01.2024
Bioretention plants not impaired by road salt
Bioretention plants not impaired by road salt
The salt used to de-ice our roads does not reduce the effectiveness of the plants used in bioretention areas, according to a new study by Henry Beral, a Ph.D. candidate at UdeM. Increasing numbers of municipalities across Quebec are building bioretention areas to manage storm runoff. These areas serve two important functions.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.01.2024
UW researchers uncover new clues about the cause of common birth defects
UW researchers uncover new clues about the cause of common birth defects
Cleft lip and palate are the most common craniofacial birth defects in humans, affecting more than 175,000 newborns around the world each year. Yet despite decades of research, it's still not known what causes most cases or what can be done to prevent them. But a recent study from the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) has uncovered new information about orofacial development in mice that researchers believe could one day help reduce the risk of these birth defects in humans.

Environment - 19.01.2024
More clutter for more biodiversity
More clutter for more biodiversity
It may look chaotic, but deadwood in the forest does have a function. It has a decisive influence on biodiversity. Researcher Elena Haeler has shown in a study that not only the quantity but also the distribution of deadwood in the habitat plays an important role . Until now, research into deadwood has mainly focused on the amount of wood present.

Environment - Life Sciences - 19.01.2024
Chilled out tadpoles defy climate odds
University of Queensland researchers have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that allows tadpoles in cold environments to mitigate the detrimental effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The study, led by Coen Hird from UQ's School of the Environment , challenges previous assumptions about the vulnerability of amphibians to climate change and sheds light on their remarkable resilience.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.01.2024
Costs of scaring grass-eating barnacle geese often outweigh the benefits
Costs of scaring grass-eating barnacle geese often outweigh the benefits
At the current population sizes, the practice of scaring geese off pastures in the province of Friesland probably ends up costing more than it saves. Utrecht University ecologist Monique de Jager and colleagues from Wageningen University and Research, the University of Amsterdam, and the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) conclude this based on a model study , that was conducted as part of the Dutch contribution to European goose management.

Environment - History / Archeology - 17.01.2024
Stalagmites as Climate Archive
Researchers from Heidelberg and Karlsruhe use stalagmite to reconstruct regional and global climate history When combined with data from tree-ring records, stalagmites can open up a unique archive to study natural climate fluctuations across hundreds of years, a research team including geoscientists from Heidelberg University and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have demonstrated.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.01.2024
Climate and health impacts of dust inaccurately represented
The source and amounts of different types of mineral dust reaching the Earth's atmosphere needs to be re-evaluated so its effects on human health and climate change can be more accurately understood, scientists claim. The international team, led by Cardiff University, says existing models have over-estimated the role of North Africa as the primary source of global dust emissions for nearly thirty years leading to inaccuracies in our understanding of the impacts on rainforests, oceans and ice.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.01.2024
NASA Study: More Greenland Ice Lost Than Previously Estimated
A new, comprehensive analysis of satellite data finds that majority of glaciers on the landmass have retreated significantly. Jakobshavn Isbrae, a glacier on Greenland's western coast shown in these satellite images, retreated significantly between 1985 (left) and 2022 (right), losing about 97 billion tons (88 billion metric tons) of ice.
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