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Environment - 20.05.2024
Increasing drought puts the resilience of the Amazon rainforest to the test
Increasing drought puts the resilience of the Amazon rainforest to the test
Since 2015, the Amazon has been slower to recover from increasing drought events, but, overall, the rainforest still shows a remarkable resilience. New international research led by KU Leuven earth and environmental scientists shows that forest degradation due to drought has been most pronounced in the southern Amazon, where human impact is greatest.   Since the turn of the century, four extreme droughts have occurred in the Amazon rainforest.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.05.2024
Preventive locust management: humanitarian crises averted
A new study, published by scientists from CIRAD and INRAE, provides a state-of-the-art assessment of the risk of Desert Locust invasions in West and North Africa, by analyzing 40 years of field data and climate records. The study reveals that preventive management measures have been successful in countering the favorable effects of climate change on outbreaks of the pest.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.05.2024
Regional differences in bird diversity in agroforestry systems
Regional differences in bird diversity in agroforestry systems
International research team investigates benefits of forest proximity for cocoa cultivation   The diversity and ecological functionality of bird communities in tropical agroforestry systems are shaped by the surrounding landscape, in particular the extent and composition of the forest. An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has now investigated the composition and ecological traits of bird communities in 23 cocoa agroforestry systems in Peru.

Environment - 17.05.2024
Tropical forest resilience to seasonal drought linked to nutrient availability
Tropical forest resilience to seasonal drought linked to nutrient availability
International research team carry out Africa's first large-scale nutrient addition experiment with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium Tropical forests are highly productive ecosystems accounting for nearly half of the global forest carbon sink. If tropical forests can no longer remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the effects of climate change may become even more severe.

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.05.2024
Earth's earliest sea creatures drove evolution by stirring the water
Earth’s earliest sea creatures drove evolution by stirring the water
3D reconstructions suggest that simple marine animals living over 560 million years ago drove the emergence of more complex life by mixing the seawater around them It's exciting to learn that the very first animals from 580 million years ago had a significant impact on their environment, despite not being able to move or swim.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 17.05.2024
UW atmospheric scientist participating in field campaign to improve Western snowfall, drought forecasts
University of Washington atmospheric scientist Lynn McMurdie has led campaigns to measure rain and snowfall in places ranging from Washington's Olympic Peninsula to Argentina to the Eastern U.S. Now she's among the leaders of a field campaign in Colorado to better understand and forecast snowfall in the mountains of the Western U.S. A scientific expedition this coming winter in Colorado's Yampa Valley will improve forecasts of snowfall and estimates of how climate change will impact snowpack and water availability in mountainous regions of the West.

Chemistry - Environment - 17.05.2024
Sun, sustainability, and silicon: A double dose of Yale solar fuel research
Sun, sustainability, and silicon: A double dose of Yale solar fuel research
Two Yale-led studies indicate the promise of finding hybrid approaches to developing alternative solar fuels. The CHASE is on to develop a new generation of liquid fuels that are activated by sunlight, and Yale researchers are helping to lead the way. Over the past decade, basic research aimed at creating sustainable, solar-powered liquid fuel has reached a crossroads.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.05.2024
Healthy Diets for People and the Planet
A study by researchers at the University of Bonn examines the ecological sustainability of children's and young people's diets Our diet puts a strain on planetary resources. Shifting to a sustainable diet that benefits both our health and that of the planet is therefore assuming increasing importance.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.05.2024
Scientists unlock key to breeding ’carbon gobbling’ plants with a major appetite
The discovery of how a critical enzyme "hidden in nature's blueprint" works by scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) and the University of Newcastle (UoN) could help engineer climate resilient crops capable of sucking far more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in a much more efficient way.

Environment - Architecture - 15.05.2024
Using AI to improve building energy use and comfort
New study from Waterloo researchers creating climate change-proof buildings with deep learning-powered inspections    University of Waterloo researchers have developed a new method that can lead to significant energy savings in buildings. The team identified 28 major heat loss regions in a multi-unit residential building with the most severe ones being at wall intersections and around windows.

Environment - Innovation - 15.05.2024
Using solar energy to generate heat at high temperatures
Using solar energy to generate heat at high temperatures
Instead of burning coal or oil to produce cement or steel, in the future solar energy could be used for this purpose. Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a thermal trap that can absorb concentrated sunlight and deliver heat at over thousand degrees Celsius. The production of cement, metals and many chemical commodities requires extremely high temperatures of over a thousand degrees Celsius.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.05.2024
Most dangerous areas for whale shark-shipping vessel collisions revealed
Most dangerous areas for whale shark-shipping vessel collisions revealed
Researchers have found that heavily used shipping lanes pass through crucial whale shark feeding grounds, posing a threat to this endangered species. Research published in Science of the Total Environment has revealed areas where the sharks are at the highest risk of colliding with large shipping vessels by mapping the locations of whale shark aggregations and overlaying them with information on shipping traffic.

Environment - 15.05.2024
Copper can’t be mined fast enough to electrify the US
Copper cannot be mined quickly enough to keep up with current U.S. policy guidelines to transition the country's electricity and vehicle infrastructure to renewable energy, according to a University of Michigan study. The Inflation Reduction Act, signed into law in 2022, calls for 100% of cars manufactured to be electric vehicles by 2035.

Environment - Chemistry - 15.05.2024
Repurposed beer yeast may offer a cost-effective way to remove lead from water
Repurposed beer yeast may offer a cost-effective way to remove lead from water
A filter made from yeast encapsulated in hydrogels can quickly absorb lead as water flows through it. Every year, beer breweries generate and discard thousands of tons of surplus yeast. Researchers from MIT and Georgia Tech have now come up with a way to repurpose that yeast to absorb lead from contaminated water.

Environment - 15.05.2024
Summers warm up faster than winters, fossil shells from Antwerp show
Summers warm up faster than winters, fossil shells from Antwerp show
In a warmer climate, summers warm much faster than winters. That is the conclusion of research into fossil shells by earth scientist Niels de Winter. With this knowledge we can better map the consequences of current global warming in the North Sea area. De Winter, affiliated with the Department of Earth Sciences at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the AMGC research group at Vrije Universiteit Brussel, measured alongside colleagues from institutions such as the Institute for Natural Sciences in Brussels the chemical composition of fossil shells from Antwerp, Belgium.

Paleontology - Environment - 15.05.2024
First ’warm-blooded’ dinosaurs may have emerged 180 million years ago
The ability to regulate body temperature, a trait all mammals and birds have today, may have evolved among some dinosaurs early in the Jurassic period about 180 million years ago, suggests a new study led by UCL and University of Vigo researchers. In the early 20 century, dinosaurs were considered slow-moving, "cold-blooded" animals like modern-day reptiles, relying on heat from the sun to regulate their temperature.

Environment - History / Archeology - 14.05.2024
2023 was the hottest summer in two thousand years
Researchers have found that 2023 was the hottest summer in the Northern Hemisphere in the past two thousand years, almost four degrees warmer than the coldest summer during the same period. When you look at the long sweep of history, you can see just how dramatic recent global warming is Ulf Büntgen Although 2023 has been reported as the hottest year on record, the instrumental evidence only reaches back as far as 1850 at best, and most records are limited to certain regions.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.05.2024
Portable method lets scientists identify plant DNA out in the field
Portable method lets scientists identify plant DNA out in the field
In EPFL's GenoRobotics project, a cross-disciplinary team of students is developing a novel method for identifying plant DNA - one that's faster, cheaper and less energy-intensive than the conventional one. The team hopes their new protocol, designed for use out in the field, will make it easier to categorize plants and ultimately help protect biodiversity.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 14.05.2024
Mosaic grassland landscapes are the most beneficial
Mosaic grassland landscapes are the most beneficial
Like forests, grassland provides numerous ecological, economic and social benefits. Researchers in the Swiss canton of Solothurn have investigated ways to maintain and improve these benefits. Grass, clover and herbs are the foundation of Swiss agriculture: two-thirds of Switzerland's agricultural land is grassland, much of which is barely suitable for arable farming.

Innovation - Environment - 14.05.2024
Affordable sensor for lead contamination
Affordable sensor for lead contamination
The chip-scale device could provide sensitive detection of lead levels in drinking water, whose toxicity affects 240 million people worldwide. Engineers at MIT, Nanyang Technological University, and several companies have developed a compact and inexpensive technology for detecting and measuring lead concentrations in water, potentially enabling a significant advance in tackling this persistent global health issue.