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Environment/Sustainable Development



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Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
17.02.2018
Hope remains to save the world's most trafficked animal as it enjoys the spotlight of a global day in its honour
Hope remains to save the world’s most trafficked animal as it enjoys the spotlight of a global day in its honour
Hope remains to save the world's most trafficked animal as it enjoys the spotlight of a global day in its honour Did you know that the world's most trafficked animal is having its own international day today? On World Pangolin Day , the University of Sussex is determined to raise awareness of the mammal's plight as they face a desperate fight against extinction.
Environment/Sustainable Development
16.02.2018
Laser technology reveals the weight of some of UK's and world's biggest trees
Laser technology reveals the weight of some of UK’s and world’s biggest trees
New laser scanning technology is being used by UCL scientists to provide fresh and unprecedented insights into the structure and mass of trees, a development that will help plot how much carbon they absorb and how they might respond to climate change. Two studies, published today (Friday) by the Royal Society, by researchers at UCL and the universities of Oxford, Sonoma State, Ghent and Wageningen, reveal the technology has captured the 3D structure of individual trees in ways they have never been seen before.
Environment/Sustainable Development
16.02.2018
Arctic worming?
In North America, the spread of European earthworms is a known environmental issue as it has turned out that some of these species are capable of altering entire forest ecosystems. In Sweden, we have so far had a positive approach to earthworms and no policies have been put in place to limit the spread of these worms in Swedish national parks.
Environment/Sustainable Development
15.02.2018
UK fracking industry would need strict controls to minimise spill risk
UK fracking industry would need strict controls to minimise spill risk
UK fracking industry would need strict controls to minimise spill risk (15 February 2018) Strict controls would be “a necessity” to minimise the risk of spills and leaks from any future UK shale gas industry, according to new research. The recommendation comes from scientists who have investigated the possible risk of spills from well sites and tankers used to transport chemicals and contaminated fluids to and from fracking sites.
Computer Science/Telecom - Environment/Sustainable Development
14.02.2018
The uncertain unicycle that taught itself and how it's helping AI make good decisions
The uncertain unicycle that taught itself and how it’s helping AI make good decisions
Cambridge researchers are pioneering a form of machine learning that starts with only a little prior knowledge and continually learns from the world around it. This is just like a human would learn. We don't start knowing everything. We learn things incrementally, from only a few examples, and we know when we are not yet confident in our understanding Zoubin Ghahramani In the centre of the screen is a tiny unicycle.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
13.02.2018
Sewage and animal waste having serious impact on UK coastline
Analysis of fragile seagrass meadows by Cardiff University and Swansea University scientists has shown that consistent pollution from sewage and livestock waste is affecting their survival. Seagrass meadows are flowering plants that have adapted to live a life in the sea and were recently featured in the BBC's Blue Planet II episode ‘Green Seas'.
History/Archeology - Environment/Sustainable Development
13.02.2018
Citrus fruit peel offers new evidence on early cultivation
Citrus fruit peel offers new evidence on early cultivation
Citrus fruit was being cultivated in India in the Late Neolithic period and in southern Thailand in the Iron Age, according to new findings by archaeologists at UCL and Peking University, Beijing. Citrus fruit are widespread and well known nearly everywhere today, but very little is known about how they were domesticated and diversified.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Agronomy/Food Science
13.02.2018
Forest fires during droughts are major source of Amazonian carbon emissions
Forest fires during droughts are major source of Amazonian carbon emissions
Extreme droughts in the Brazilian Amazon are causing forest fires that release significant carbon emissions, reveals a new study. Despite significant achievements by the Brazilian authorities in curbing carbon emissions from deforestation, these gains could be undermined by repeated droughts in the 21st Century.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Agronomy/Food Science
13.02.2018
Intensive agriculture influences U.S. regional summer climate, study finds
Intensive agriculture influences U.S. regional summer climate, study finds
Scientists agree that changes in land use such as deforestation, and not just greenhouse gas emissions, can play a significant role altering the world's climate systems. Now, a new study by researchers at MIT and Dartmouth College reveals how another type of  land use, intensive agriculture, can impact regional climate.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
12.02.2018
Illuminating the hidden kingdom of the truffle
Truffles are one of the world's most expensive ingredients, and also one of the most mysterious. Now, with the help of a 170-year-old 'living laboratory', and a dog called Lucy, researchers hope to unearth new understanding of the secret life of these underground delicacies.
Environment/Sustainable Development
12.02.2018
Lightning storms less likely in a warming planet, study suggests
Lightning storms less likely in a warming planet, study suggests
Lightning may strike less often in future across the globe as the planet warms, a scientific study suggests. The research forecasts a 15 per cent drop in the average number of lightning flashes worldwide by the turn of this century, if global temperatures are in the top range of forecasts. A drop in the incidence of lightning strikes could impact on the frequency of wildfires, especially in tropical regions.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
09.02.2018
Research uncovers the mysterious lives of narwhals
Research uncovers the mysterious lives of narwhals
Narwhals are some of the most elusive creatures in the ocean, spending most of their lives in deep water far from shore. But research being presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting in Portland Feb. 12 may shed a bit of light on these enigmatic marine mammals. New research shows narwhals may prefer to congregate near unique glacier fjords with thick ice fronts and low to moderate calving activity, where icebergs break off infrequently.
Environment/Sustainable Development
09.02.2018
MPs need better support to talk to their constituents about climate change, study finds
MPs need better support to talk to their constituents about climate change, study finds
Many politicians want to see action on climate change but some admit they avoid mentioning it to their constituents because they do not think their views will be supported, according to new research based on interviews with MPs. The study by Rebecca Willis at Lancaster University and think tank Green Alliance, says politicians face major challenges getting people engaged in what is often seen as a global issue rather than a local one.
Environment/Sustainable Development
08.02.2018
Simple rules can help fishery managers cope with ecological complexity
Simple rules can help fishery managers cope with ecological complexity
To successfully manage fisheries, factors in the environment that affect fish - like food sources, predators and habitat - should be considered as part of a holistic management plan. That approach is gaining traction in fisheries management, but there has been no broad-scale evaluation of whether considering these ecosystem factors makes any economic sense for the commercial fishing industry.
Environment/Sustainable Development
08.02.2018
Avoiding blackouts with 100% renewable energy
Researchers propose three separate ways to avoid blackouts if the world transitions all its energy to electricity or direct heat and provides the energy with 100 percent wind, water and sunlight. The solutions reduce energy requirements, health damage and climate damage. Renewable energy solutions are often hindered by the inconsistencies of power produced by wind, water and sunlight and the continuously fluctuating demand for energy.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
08.02.2018
Climate change, urbanization driving opossum's northward march
Climate change, urbanization driving opossum’s northward march
ANN ARBOR-The headline reads like something from the satirical newspaper The Onion: "Grand Forks opossum slain; body to go to University of Michigan for research." But for U-M graduate biology student Lisa Walsh, this was no laughing matter. Walsh's doctoral dissertation is focused on the ongoing northward range expansion of the common Virginia opossum, and she'd been expecting the nomadic marsupials to show up in North Dakota's Red River Valley eventually.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
07.02.2018
Increased UV from ozone depletion sterilizes trees
Increased UV from ozone depletion sterilizes trees
Pine trees become temporarily sterile when exposed to ultraviolet radiation as intense as some scientists believe the Earth experienced 252 million years ago during the planet's largest mass extinction, lending support to the theory that ozone depletion contributed to the crisis. Jeffrey Benca exposed dwarf pines to 13 times the level of dangerous UV-B radiation we get on a sunny day, and found that the conditions, similar to what some think occured during Earth's largest extinction 252 million years ago, made the trees sterile.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Astronomy
07.02.2018
Ice core shows North American ice sheet's retreat affected Antarctic weather
Ice core shows North American ice sheet’s retreat affected Antarctic weather
Researchers at the University of Washington were among the co-authors of a new study that uses ice core data to see how Earth's climate behaved at the end of the last ice age, when the Laurentide Ice Sheet covering much of North America retreated about 16,000 years ago. The study led by the University of Colorado Boulder is published online this week and will be in the Feb.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Medicine/Pharmacology
07.02.2018
Confirming the risks of pesticide use in Burkina Faso
Confirming the risks of pesticide use in Burkina Faso
Poor pesticide practices in Burkina Faso pose a threat to human health and the environment. An EPFL thesis has quantified this problem for the first time through an analysis of soil, water, sediment, vegetable and hair samples. Small-scale vegetable growers in Burkina Faso are unfamiliar with the proper use of pesticides and end up exposing both people and the environment to serious contamination risks.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
06.02.2018
Decay of the North American ice sheet since the last ice age decreased climate variability in the Southern Hemisphere
Decay of the North American ice sheet since the last ice age decreased climate variability in the Southern Hemisphere
A scientist from the University of Bristol is part of an international team that has shown that the changing topography of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere during the last Ice Age forced changes in the climate of Antarctica, a previously undocumented inter-polar climate change mechanism. The new research co-authored by Dr William Roberts from Bristol's School of Geographical Sciences and led by the University of Colorado Boulder has been published in the journal Nature .
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