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Environment/Sustainable Development



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Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
25.09.2017
Brain damage in fish affected by plastic nanoparticles
Brain damage in fish affected by plastic nanoparticles
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that plastic particles in water may end up inside fish brains. The plastic can cause brain damage, which is the likely cause of behavioural disorders observed in the fish. Calculations have shown that 10 per cent of all plastic produced around the world ultimately ends up in the oceans.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Social Sciences
21.09.2017
The Women's March Mobilised People with Diverse Interests: study
The Women’s March Mobilised People with Diverse Interests: study
People who participated in the Women's March in Washington DC in January 2017 were motivated by a range of diverse issues that cut across race, gender, and sexuality but shared similar educational backgrounds, a new study finds. It was led by researcher Dana R. Fisher, a Professor at the University of Maryland, and currently a visiting guest professor at Lund University in Sweden.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
20.09.2017
10,000 year-old DNA proves when fish colonialized our lakes
DNA in lake sediment forms a natural archive displaying when various fish species colonized lakes after the glacial period. This according to researchers at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Science at Umeå University in a study published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution. Their analyses of the prevalence of whitefish DNA in sediment reveal that the whitefish came to Lake Stora Lögdasjön in Västerbotten already 10,000 years ago, whereas Lake Hotagen in Jämtland had its whitefish only 2,200 years ago.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
19.09.2017
Size matters in battle against extinction, scientists find
Researchers have found the Goldilocks zone for animals lies in being mid-sized, with apex predators over-hunted and small vertebrates like pollinators threatened by habitat changes because they cannot move far from home. Quick overview of the findings Filmed by Dr Newsome; edited by the Australian Science Media Centre.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
18.09.2017
A Cereal survives heat and drought
A Cereal survives heat and drought
Pearl millet genome sequence provides a resource to improve agronomic traits in extreme environments An international consortium under the lead of the non-profit organization "International Crops Res
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
14.09.2017
Unexpected facets of Antarctica emerge from the labs
Unexpected facets of Antarctica emerge from the labs
Six months after the Antarctic Circumnavigation Expedition ended, the teams that ran the 22 scientific projects are hard at work sorting through the many samples they collected. Some preliminary findings were announced during a conference in Crans Montana organized by the Swiss Polar Institute, who just appointed Konrad Steffen as new academic director.
Environment/Sustainable Development
12.09.2017
Biding time could improve conservation outcomes
Strategic delays in conservation efforts could be the key to protecting more species according to researchers at The University of Queensland. The new study found instead of spending project funds immediately, conservation organisations could use the right amount of delay to improve the benefits achieved from their funding by focussing first on investment, capacity building, or monitoring and research.
Environment/Sustainable Development
12.09.2017
Palm Islands coral loss long precedes 2016 mass bleaching
Palm Islands coral loss long precedes 2016 mass bleaching
Extensive loss of branching corals and changes in coral community structure in Australia's Palm Islands region over the past century has been revealed in a new study. Dr Tara Clark of The University of Queensland Radiogenic Isotope Facility in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences said these corals were highly sensitive to environmental change.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Environment/Sustainable Development
11.09.2017
Air pollution cuts three years off lifespans in northern China
Editor's note: This story has been translated into Chinese. There are currently an estimated 4.5 billion people around the world exposed to levels of particulate air pollution that are at least twice what the World Health Organization considers safe. Yet the impact of sustained exposure to pollution on a person's life expectancy has largely remained a vexingly unanswered question-until now.
Chemistry - Environment/Sustainable Development
07.09.2017
Chemists discover molecular iodine in Arctic atmosphere, released by snowpack
Chemists discover molecular iodine in Arctic atmosphere, released by snowpack
ANN ARBOR-For the first time, scientists have measured molecular iodine in the atmosphere of the Arctic and discovered that it is being released by the Arctic's snowpack in the changing polar climate, according to research led by the University of Michigan Department of Chemistry. "Essentially, we've found this unique chemistry occurring within the Arctic snowpack that hadn't previously been observed.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
07.09.2017
New research disputes claims that climate change helped spark the Syrian civil war
New research disputes claims that climate change helped spark the Syrian civil war
New research disputes claims that climate change helped spark the Syrian civil war A new study, published today in the journal Political Geography , shows that there is no sound evidence that global climate change was a factor in causing the Syrian civil war. Claims that a major drought caused by anthropogenic climate change was a key factor in starting the Syrian civil war have gained considerable traction since 2015 and have become an accepted narrative in the press, most recently repeated by former US vice president Al Gore in relation to Brexit.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
07.09.2017
Eighteenth century nautical charts reveal coral loss
Eighteenth century nautical charts reveal coral loss
Centuries-old nautical charts, mapped by long-deceased sailors to avoid shipwrecks, have been used by modern scientists to study loss of coral reefs. A new US and Australian study - including research from The University of Queensland and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies - compared early British charts to modern coral habitat maps to understand changes to reef environments.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Administration/Government
06.09.2017
Biodiversity proves its real-world value
Biodiversity proves its real-world value
ANN ARBOR-Hundreds of experiments have suggested that biodiversity fosters healthier, more productive ecosystems. But many experts doubted that results from small-scale experiments would hold up in real-world ecosystems where nature is most unpredictable and complex. A Smithsonian Institution and University of Michigan study scheduled for publication Sept.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
04.09.2017
Reindeer grazing protects tundra plant diversity in a warming climate
Climate warming reduces the number of plant species in the tundra, but plant-eating animals, such as reindeer and voles, can turn this negative effect into something positive. The results of a study coordinated from Umeå University in Sweden are now published. "By eating tall and wide-leaved plants, reindeer can increase light availability and thus allow more plant species to co-exist and benefit from warmer conditions," says Elina Kaarlejärvi, post-doctoral researcher at Umeå University, who led the study.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Computer Science/Telecom
31.08.2017
A new mobile application helps scientists map the sound environment
A new mobile application helps scientists map the sound environment
Anyone who owns an Android smartphone will soon be able to contribute to a research project, simply by recording surrounding noise.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
30.08.2017
A big difference between Asian and African elephants is diet
New research has shown that there are significant differences between the Asian and the African forest elephant - and it isn't just about size and the shape of their ears. It is about what they eat and how they affect forest ecosystems. See video here. As megaherbivores and the largest of our land animals, elephants have a significant impact on their habitat.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
29.08.2017
Conservation hindered by geographical mismatches between capacity and need
New research suggests that geographical mismatches between conservation needs and expertise may hinder global conservation goals. Experts from the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus and other institutions have examined geographical patterns within the leadership of the conservation science publishing system focusing on the affiliation of journal editors, who serve as gatekeepers and leaders in the scientific process.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
28.08.2017
CO2 and temperature decoupling at the million-year scale during the Cretaceous Greenhouse
CO2 and temperature decoupling at the million-year scale during the Cretaceous Greenhouse
Optical microscopic view of a cuticle of the Frenelopsis fossil conifer used to reconstruct the atmospheric CO2 concentration in the Cretaceous.
Environment/Sustainable Development
23.08.2017
Using compost to preserve forests in Madagascar
Using compost to preserve forests in Madagascar
Research by an EPFL PhD student has found a way to boost Madagascar's corn crop yields up to five times while decreasing deforestation at the same time.
Environment/Sustainable Development
23.08.2017
Sub-tropical corals vulnerable, new study shows
Sub-tropical corals vulnerable, new study shows
The vulnerability and conservation value of sub-tropical reefs south of the Great Barrier Reef - regarded as climate change refuges - has been highlighted in a new study. University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences researcher Dr Brigitte Sommer said the study of Eastern Australian reefs revealed coral species would likely shift their distribution southward in response to climate change.
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