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Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 10:01
Is the sky the limit?
Is the sky the limit?
What stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? The biomathematician Jitka Polechová, an Elise Richter Fellow at the University of Vienna, has published a paper in PLoS Biology which explains the formation of species' range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of species, are fundamental to the stability of their range: the environmental heterogeneity and the size of the local population.

Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 18.06.2018
Collecting bacterial communities from puddles helps solve ecosystem riddles
Researchers have used puddle ecosystems to start to unravel the roles different bacteria play in complex communities. Bacteria coat every surface on Earth, living in soil and water, and even inside other creatures including ourselves. They often play critical roles, such as helping us digest food or providing ‘ecosystem services' like decomposing dead plant matter and returning the nutrients to the soil.

Environment / Sustainable Development - 18.06.2018
Understanding Antarctic ice sheet changes
Understanding Antarctic ice sheet changes
The West Antarctic Ice Sheet was able to re-grow after shrinking but the process is not fast enough to combat the impact of today's climate change, according to research involving Durham University. The research 000 years ago the West Antarctic Ice Sheet shrank to a size even smaller than today but managed to re-grow to its current size thanks to uplifting of the seafloor as the weight of the ice became less.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.06.2018
Overuse of agricultural chemicals on China’s small farms harms health and environment: new study
The size of farms in China is a key contributor to the overuse of agricultural chemicals, and as a result they may be too small to be environmentally sustainable, a new study has found. The research - conducted by a team from the Universities of Melbourne, Zhejiang, Fudan, Wuhan and Stanford -  is published today in the  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

Astronomy - Environment / Sustainable Development - 14.06.2018
Study may help humans colonise Mars and hunt for alien life
This might sound like science fiction, but space agencies and private companies around the world are actively trying to turn this aspiration into reality in the not-too-distant future. Scientists at ANU have contributed to an international study that will potentially help humans to colonise Mars and find life on other planets.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.06.2018
Reduction of Environmental Impacts of Plant Protection Products Is Possible
Reduction of Environmental Impacts of Plant Protection Products Is Possible
Zurich-Reckenholz, 14.06.2018 - Agroscope researchers investigated the risks and environmental impacts of plant-protection products (PPPs) in Switzerland's main agricultural crops. They found that a targeted selection of active substances and systematic adherence to the principles of integrated plant protection can significantly reduce the risks and undesirable environmental impacts of PPPs.

Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 13.06.2018
Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to Scotland
Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to Scotland
Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to Scotland Research, led by the University of Sussex and the University of Kent, indicates that for wolves to be effective at directly reducing red deer numbers and allowing nature to recover in the Scottish Highlands they may need to be reintroduced to very large fenced reserve.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 13.06.2018
Cities alter body size of animal communities
Introduction: A large and international team of ecologists reports in the renowned journal Nature that urbanization is driving body-size shifts in animal communities. Three authors of the Global Change Ecology Centre , Erik Matthysen , Lisa Baardsen and Thierry Backeljau (all belonging to the research group Evolutionary Ecology ), contributed to the study.

Environment / Sustainable Development - 13.06.2018
Sustainable certified palm oil scheme failing to achieve goals
There is little evidence that a certification scheme for palm oil plantations is improving protection of critically endangered orangutans in Borneo, researchers say. A study by The University of Queensland, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) and Borneo Futures found vague targets, concepts and terminology left too much to interpretation.

Environment / Sustainable Development - 12.06.2018
Warmer climate will dramatically increase the volatility of global corn crops
New research examines how warmer temperatures will impact corn yields throughout the world. Photo credit: fishhawk/Flickr A new study co-authored by a Stanford Earth researcher looks at what climate change will mean for global yields of corn, or maize, the most widely grown crop in the world.

Environment / Sustainable Development - 12.06.2018
New insights into the contribution of land ice to sea level rise
New insights into the contribution of land ice to sea level rise
A new study led by scientists from the University of Bristol has provided an up-to-date insight into the impact of melting land ice on sea levels. The new estimate shows there has been a six-fold increase in annual land ice contribution to global sea level rise from the mid-1990s to the early 2010s.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 11.06.2018
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
New research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions, including the University of Bristol, provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5°C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather. The paper, published today , demonstrates that higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations directly increase temperature and rainfall extremes, meaning there could be dangerous changes in these extremes even if the global mean temperature rise remains within 1.5°C.

Environment / Sustainable Development - 11.06.2018
Warmer climate will dramatically increase the volatility of global corn crops
Corn, or maize, is the most widely grown crop in the world. Used in food, cooking oil, industrialized foods, livestock feed and even automobile fuel, the crop is one that both rich and poor people rely upon. Research led by the University of Washington looks at what climate change will mean for global yields of this crop.

Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 11.06.2018
Nectar research sheds light on ecological theory
Different species almost always coexist - whether it's big animals on the plains, bugs in a jungle or yeasts in flower nectar - but how that works is complicated. Now, Stanford researchers have teased apart competing theories of how species live together. A sticky drop of nectar clinging to the tip of a hummingbird's beak drips into the next flower the bird visits.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 11.06.2018
Choice matters: The environmental costs of producing meat, seafood
Which food type is more environmentally costly to produce - livestock, farmed seafood, or wild-caught fish? The answer is, it depends. But in general, industrial beef production and farmed catfish are the most taxing on the environment, while small, wild-caught fish and farmed mollusks like oysters, mussels and scallops have the lowest environmental impact, according to a new analysis.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 08.06.2018
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
New research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5°C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather. The paper, published today , demonstrates that higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations directly increase temperature and rainfall extremes, meaning there could be dangerous changes in these extremes even if the global mean temperature rise remains within 1.5°C.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 08.06.2018
Nutritional quality of fish and squid reduced by warm water events
The nutritional quality of fish and squid deteriorates under warm water events, research reveals - with implications for the marine environment, marine predators and fisheries capturing food for human consumption. Research led by the University of Sydney shows that under warm water events the nutritional balance of fish and squid changes and is of lower quality, while under cold water events it is of higher quality.

Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 08.06.2018
Monkeys eat fats and carbs to keep warm
Crave comfort foods in cooler months' You're in good company. Golden snub-nosed monkeys prefer to eat more fats and carbohydrates in winter to help generate heat, research suggests. University of Sydney researchers have found monkeys living in the wild in cold snowy habitats adjust their nutrient intake to match the elevated costs of thermoregulation.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 07.06.2018
Scientists propose changing the rules of history to avoid environmental collapse
Scientists propose changing the rules of history to avoid environmental collapse
For the first time in our planet's 4.5 billion-year history a single species, humans, is increasingly dictating its future, according to a new book by UCL scientists.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Medicine / Pharmacology - 06.06.2018
Pollution hits the fungi that nourish European trees
Pollution is changing the fungi that provide mineral nutrients to tree roots, which could explain malnutrition trends in Europe's trees. A huge study of 13,000 soil samples across 20 European countries has revealed that many tree fungi communities are stressed by pollution, indicating that current pollution limits may not be strict enough.
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