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History / Archeology - Innovation - 25.05.2022
Early urbanism found in the Amazon
Early urbanism found in the Amazon
Archaeologists reveal pre-Hispanic cities in Bolivia with laser technology LIDAR Several hundred settlements from the time between 500 and 1400 AD lie in the Bolivian Llanos de Mojos savannah and have fascinated archaeologists for years. Researchers from the German Archaeological Institute, the University of Bonn and the University of Exeter have now visualized the dimensions of the largest known settlement of the so-called Casarabe culture.

History / Archeology - 17.05.2022
Spectacular ceiling paintings discovered in the temple of Esna
Spectacular ceiling paintings discovered in the temple of Esna
German and Egyptian researchers have uncovered a series of colourful ceiling paintings in the temple of Esna in Upper Egypt. As Professor Christian Leitz of the University of Tübingen reported, the relief-like images of the central ceiling section are a total of 46 depictions of the Upper Egyptian crown goddess Nechbet and the Lower Egyptian crown goddess Wadjet.

History / Archeology - 17.05.2022
Spectacular ceiling frescoes discovered in the Temple of Khnum at Esna
Spectacular ceiling frescoes discovered in the Temple of Khnum at Esna
In the Temple of Khnum at Esna, Upper Egypt, German and Egyptian researchers have uncovered a series of vibrantly-colored ceiling frescoes. The relief images in the central section of the ceiling, Professor Christian Leitz from the University of Tübingen reports, make up a total of 46 depictions of the Upper-Egyptian vulture goddess Nekhbet and the Lower-Egyptian serpent goddess Wadjet.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 03.05.2022
Spread of black rats was linked to human historical events
Spread of black rats was linked to human historical events
New research reveals how the black rat colonised Europe in the Roman and Medieval periods New ancient DNA analysis has shed light on how the black rat, blamed for spreading Black Death, dispersed across Europe - revealing that the rodent colonised the continent on two occasions in the Roman and Medieval periods.

Environment - History / Archeology - 26.04.2022
Neanderthals of the North
Neanderthals of the North
A multidisciplinary research team from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, the Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, the Leuphana University Lüneburg, the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics and other partner institutions investigated whether Neanderthals were well adapted to life in the cold or preferred more temperate environmental conditions.

Environment - History / Archeology - 14.04.2022
An open-air Neanderthal habitat over 120,000 years old is discovered in Aspe
An open-air Neanderthal habitat over 120,000 years old is discovered in Aspe
A research team from the Department of Prehistory, Archaeology and Ancient History of the University of Valencia (UV) led by Professor Aleix Eixea, in collaboration with the University of Alicante (UA), the Bizkaiko Arkeologi Museoa and the Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution of France have discovered and dated in Aspe (Alicante) an open-air Neanderthal habitat over 120,000 years old in the Natural Park of Los Aljezares.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 01.04.2022
Origins of the Avars elucidated with ancient DNA
Origins of the Avars elucidated with ancient DNA
Multidisciplinary research team sheds light on the 1,400-year-old mystery about the genetic origins of the Avar elite Less known than Attila's Huns, the Avars were their more successful successors. They ruled much of Central and Eastern Europe for almost 250 years. We know that they came from Central Asia in the sixth century CE, but ancient authors and modern historians debated their provenance.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 23.03.2022
Leftovers in prehistoric pottery let scientists peek into the kitchen of an ancient civilization
A study led by UPF and CSIC researchers analyzes traces of ingredients in 5300- to 4000-year-old cooking vessels. Scientists study animal lipids and microscopical remains of plants in vessels from the Bronze Age Indus Valley Civilization and preceding Copper Age cultures in northern Gujarat, India. By reconstructing the ancient ingredients, their diverse origin, and the ways of preparation, they find evidence for surprising continuity in -foodways- over 1300 years with great cultural change.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 16.03.2022
An archaeological investigation analyses peasant life in Roman Spain
An archaeological investigation analyses peasant life in Roman Spain
The archaeology of the Roman period has traditionally been focused on monumental aspects, but very little is known about what the daily life of peasantry was like. An investigation by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) delves into the life of peasant settlements based on the archaeological findings discovered in the Community of Madrid, in the numerous rescue excavations that were carried out during the real estate bubble period.

History / Archeology - 02.03.2022
7,000-year-old grains hints at origin of Swiss pile dwellings
7,000-year-old grains hints at origin of Swiss pile dwellings
There is no other place where so many Neolithic pile dwellings have been uncovered as around the Alps. It is a mystery, however, how this -building boom- came to be. Researchers at the University of Basel have now uncovered new clues, and say that settlers at Lake Varese in northern Italy may have played a leading role.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 28.02.2022
Mystery solved about the origin of the 30,000-year-old Venus of Willendorf
Mystery solved about the origin of the 30,000-year-old Venus of Willendorf
New research method shows that the material likely comes from northern Italy The almost 11 cm high figurine from Willendorf is one of the most important examples of early art in Europe. It is made of a rock called "oolite" which is not found in or around Willendorf.

History / Archeology - 11.02.2022
Identifying the portable toilets of the ancient Roman world
Identifying the portable toilets of the ancient Roman world
Arts & Humanities Erik Rolfsen New research published today in the Journal of Archaeological Science Reports reveals how archaeologists can determine when a pot was used by Romans as a portable toilet, known as a chamber pot. "Conical pots of this type have been recognized quite widely in the Roman Empire and in the absence of other evidence they have often been called storage jars.

Environment - History / Archeology - 01.02.2022
Reconstruction of the history of mankind Early human settlement on the Arabian Peninsula less influenced by climate than previously thought
Reconstruction of the history of mankind Early human settlement on the Arabian Peninsula less influenced by climate than previously thought
Research team detects early Stone Age settlement during dry periods 210,000 years ago An international team of researchers from the Sharjah Archaeology Authority/United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the Universities of Tübingen and Freiburg as well as Oxford Brookes/England led by Dr. Knut Bretzke from the University of Tübingen and Frank Preusser from the Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Freiburg has uncovered

Architecture - History / Archeology - 07.01.2022
Magnificent complexity of the Alhambra
Magnificent complexity of the Alhambra
Scientists have studied the unique features of the decorative vaulting known as muqarnas in Spain's Alhambra palace and fortress complex. Muqarnas are commonly found in Islamic architecture, yet they are poorly understood by the architectural community and the little data that exist on them have been simplified over time.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 07.01.2022
Tracing the origins of human remains from colonial contexts
Tracing the origins of human remains from colonial contexts
A scalp from Namibia and skulls from Tanzania and Papua New Guinea: these are examples of human remains from University of Jena collections that found their way to Germany during the colonial period. Extensive research has been necessary to uncover the precise origins and history of these human remains, as identification is nearly always difficult and labour-intensive.

History / Archeology - 06.01.2022
Fossil research affected by significant colonial bias
The fossil record, which documents the history of life on Earth, is heavily biased by influences such as colonialism, history and global economics, argues a new study involving palaeontologists at the University of Birmingham and the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg. The findings have significance across the field of palaeontology, but also for the ways in which researchers are able to use our knowledge of ancient fossil records to gain clearer, long term perspectives on Earth's biodiversity.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 14.12.2021
Equal at birth and in death
Equal at birth and in death
When baby 'Neve' died 10,000 years ago, she was accorded a proper burial recognizing her as a full person, archeologists on a dig in Italy find. The baby girl was born roughly 10,000 years ago, after the end of the last Ice Age in what is now Liguria, northwestern Italy, but didn't survive more than two months.

History / Archeology - 08.12.2021
2,700-Year-Old Leather Armor Proves Technology Transfer Happened in Antiquity
2,700-Year-Old Leather Armor Proves Technology Transfer Happened in Antiquity
Researchers at the University of Zurich have investigated a unique leather scale armor found in the tomb of a horse rider in Northwest China. Design and construction details of the armor indicate that it originated in the Neo-Assyrian Empire between the 6th and 8th century BCE before being brought to China.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 23.11.2021
Prehistoric mums cared for kids better than we thought
Prehistoric mums cared for kids better than we thought
A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed the death rate of babies in ancient societies is not a reflection of poor healthcare, disease and other factors, but instead is an indication of the number of babies born in that era. The findings shed new light on the history of our ancestors and debunk old assumptions that infant mortality rates were consistently high in ancient populations.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 22.11.2021
Justinianic Plague was nothing like flu and may have hit England before Constantinople | University of Cambridge
Justinianic Plague was nothing like flu and may have hit England before Constantinople | University of Cambridge
'Plague sceptics' are wrong to underestimate the devastating impact that bubonic plague had in the 6th- 8th centuries CE, argues a new study based on ancient texts and recent genetic discoveries. The same study suggests that bubonic plague may have reached England before its first recorded case in the Mediterranean via a currently unknown route, possibly involving the Baltic and Scandinavia.
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