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History / Archeology - Event - 21.06.2018
Mysterious 11,000-year-old skull headdresses go on display in Cambridge
Mysterious 11,000-year-old skull headdresses go on display in Cambridge
Three 11,500-year-old deer skull headdresses - excavated from a world-renowned archaeological site in Yorkshire - will go on display, one for the first time, at Cambridge University's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (MAA) from today. The most mysterious objects found at Star Carr are 33 deer skull headdresses.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 20.06.2018
Artificial intelligence reveals authors of anonymous 19th-century texts on evolution
Introduction: With the help of modern AI software, Koen Tanghe (UGent) and Mike Kestemont (UAntwerpen) have revealed the authors of two early papers on evolution. Some anonymously published papers on evolution far predate the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species (1859). With the help of modern AI software, Koen Tanghe (UGent) and Mike Kestemont (UAntwerpen) have revealed the authors of two of these papers.

History / Archeology - 07.06.2018
Forgotten corner of Europe brought back to life thanks to artificial intelligence
Forgotten corner of Europe brought back to life thanks to artificial intelligence
A lost world in a former empire in Europe has been brought to life thanks to University of Bristol researchers who used artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to analyse 47,000 multilingual pages from newspapers dating back to 1873. The study, published in Historical Methods , aimed to discover whether historical changes could be detected from the collective content of local newspapers from the Princely County of Gorizia and Gradisca.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 31.05.2018
First Peoples: two ancient ancestries 'reconverged' with settling of South America
First Peoples: two ancient ancestries ’reconverged’ with settling of South America
New research using ancient DNA finds that a population split after people first arrived in North America was maintained for millennia before mixing again before or during the expansion of humans into the southern continent. The lab-based science should only be a part of the research.

History / Archeology - Business / Economics - 17.05.2018
Ice-core study sheds light on ancient European civilisations
A study published in PNAS offer new insights into how European civilisations and their economies developed over time - finding links between levels of lead pollution trapped in Greenland ice and significant historical events, such as plagues, wars and imperial expansion.

History / Archeology - 16.05.2018
Ancient human remains unearthed by ANU archaeologist
To find an intact clay urn buried 4,000 years ago just centimetres beneath the surface is nothing short of a miracle An ANU archaeologist has hailed her excavation of a Bronze Age burial mound in south west England a huge success with the discovery of an intact 4,000 year old human cremation as well as evidence of unaccountable activity from the medieval period on the same site.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 10.05.2018
Leprosy Possibly Originated in Europe
Leprosy Possibly Originated in Europe
Leprosy is one of the oldest recorded and most stigmatized diseases in human history. The disease was prevalent in Europe until the 16th century and is still endemic in many countries, with over 200,000 new cases reported annually. The bacterium Mycobacterium leprae is the main cause of leprosy. Previous research on the bacterium suggested that it clusters into several strains, only two of which were present in Medieval Europe.

History / Archeology - Literature / Linguistics - 09.05.2018
Left unprinted for lack of interest: the largest German dictionary of the 18th century in Basel
Left unprinted for lack of interest: the largest German dictionary of the 18th century in Basel
For 250 years, the extensive set of manuscripts and papers lay unnoticed in the University Library's basement.

History / Archeology - Environment / Sustainable Development - 04.05.2018
New Research Project on Household Communities of the Living and the Dead in the Neolithic Period
Excavations continue in Ba'ja in the south of present-day Jordan No 089/2018 from May 04, 2018 A new research project based at Freie Universitšt's Institute of Ancient Near Eastern Archeology is investigating Neolithic households and burial culture at the Ba'ja site in the south of present-day Jordan.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 03.05.2018
Scientists call for ’open-skies’ imagery policy over Israel and Palestine
A 2013 CNES/Airbus satellite image of a new site that could be identified because looting pits over the site are visible on high-resolution satellite imagery. Map data ©2018 Google. New Oxford University research has called for an 'open-skies policy' around the availability of high resolution satellite imagery of Israel and Palestine.† Since 1997, the Kyl-Bingaman Amendment †(KBA) to the 1997 U.S. National Defense Authorization Act, has limited the availability of high-resolution satellite imagery of these countries.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 30.04.2018
The rose genome deciphered: from the origin of modern roses to the characteristics of their blooms
The rose genome deciphered: from the origin of modern roses to the characteristics of their blooms
The rose: an ornamental plant emblematic of the cultural and economic history of mankind. An international consortium involving INRA, ENS de Lyon, CEA, CNRS and Universitť Claude Bernard Lyon 1, has deciphered the genome of the rose. This work has enabled them to trace the respective contributions of European and Chinese roses to the genome of modern plants, and identify all the genes involved in the pathways for the biosynthesis of perfume and colour.

Environment / Sustainable Development - History / Archeology - 20.04.2018
Rapid Evolution Fails to Save Butterflies from Extinction
Rapid Evolution Fails to Save Butterflies from Extinction
New research into the Edith's checkerspot butterfly shows how wild species react to human-induced changes to their environment. Camille Parmesan AUSTIN, Texas - New research confirms that wild species can adapt quickly to human-induced changes, but also shows how such adaptation can cause those species to be caught in deadly "eco-evolutionary traps" when humans introduce new resources in the environment and then quickly take them away.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 19.04.2018
Dodo’s violent death revealed
World famous Oxford Dodo died after being shot in the back of the head - breakthrough evidence revealed through new research by the University of Oxford's Museum of Natural History and WMG at the University of Warwick The Oxford Dodo is the only dodo specimen in the world to contain soft tissue and extractable DNA "This discovery reveals important new information about the history of the Oxford Dodo," says Professor Paul Smith from the Universit

History / Archeology - Physics / Materials Science - 19.04.2018
Red and yellow paint on Antonine Wall
Dr Louisa Campbell with the Summerston distance stone at The Hunterian Museum University of Glasgow archaeologist using cutting edge technology on remnants of the Antonine Wall has shown parts of it were painted in bright colours. Dr Louisa Campbell's research, which has used x-ray and laser technology to analyse parts of the Roman Empire's most north-western frontier, showed it was painted with vibrant red and yellows.

Medicine / Pharmacology - History / Archeology - 16.04.2018
What’s in a name? Yale researchers track PTSD’s many identities during war
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with military activities for as long as wars have been fought - but this disorder was only named in the 1980s. A new Yale paper published April 16, 2018 in Chronic Stress documents a different kind of war - a war of words - that has been fought over the name of the disorder, and may have slowed clinical and scientific progress on the disorder.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 10.04.2018
Wildlife haven of Sulawesi much younger than first thought
An Oxford University collaboration has shed light on the origins of some of South East Asia's most iconic and unique wildlife; the 'deer-pig' (Sulawesi Babirusa), 'warty pig' and the 'miniature buffalo.' In doing so, the research has revealed that Sulawesi, the island paradise where they were discovered, is younger than previously thought.† Sitting in a region called Wallacea (named after Alfred Russel Wallace, who discovered the island), at the interface of Eurasia and Australia - two vastly different eco-zones, the island of Sulawesi is home to hundreds of unique plant and animal species.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 05.04.2018
WW1 Prisoner of War letters published 100 years after being written
WW1 Prisoner of War letters published 100 years after being written
The letters speak of love, longing, worry and war. A prisoner of war and his family writing to each other to ease the pain of separation during the First World War. Now seven months of correspondence, between Professor Archibald Allan Bowman and his wife Mabel, will be published by the University of Glasgow on the centenary of the day they were first written.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 04.04.2018
Inner Ear Provides Clues to Human Dispersal
Inner Ear Provides Clues to Human Dispersal
The early migration of humans out of Africa and across the world can be proven using genetic and morphological analyses. However, morphological data from the skull and skeleton often only allow limited conclusions to be drawn about the geographical dispersal pattern, especially because of the many ways in which the human skeleton adapts to local environmental conditions.

Computer Science / Telecom - History / Archeology - 03.04.2018
Algorithms reveal changes in stereotypes
New Stanford research shows that, over the past century, linguistic changes in gender and ethnic stereotypes correlated with major social movements and demographic changes in the U.S. Census data. Artificial intelligence systems and machine-learning algorithms have come under fire recently because they can pick up and reinforce existing biases in our society, depending on what data they are programmed with.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 21.03.2018
Macaques choose stone tools based on own size and strength
Macaques choose stone tools based on own size and strength
Macaques appear to select stone tools to crack open oil palm nuts based on the size and strength of their own body, rather than the optimum weight and size of the stone, to make the process more efficient, according to new research led by UCL.
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