« BACK

History/Archeology



Results 1 - 20 of 433.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 22 Next »

History/Archeology - Life Sciences
14.02.2018
The history of domestication: a rabbit’s tale
Wild rabbits are widely thought to have been first tamed in 600 A.D. by French monks, when they were prized as food as a 'meat substitute' during Lent. But, according to Oxford University research, that isn't true. Domestication, which is often defined as 'the process of taming an animal and keeping it as a pet or on a farm, and the cultivation of a plant for food', can be dated using historical and archaeological records.
History/Archeology - Environment/Sustainable Development
13.02.2018
Citrus fruit peel offers new evidence on early cultivation
Citrus fruit peel offers new evidence on early cultivation
Citrus fruit was being cultivated in India in the Late Neolithic period and in southern Thailand in the Iron Age, according to new findings by archaeologists at UCL and Peking University, Beijing. Citrus fruit are widespread and well known nearly everywhere today, but very little is known about how they were domesticated and diversified.
Life Sciences - History/Archeology
07.02.2018
Face of first Brit revealed
Face of first Brit revealed
The face of 'Cheddar Man', Britain's oldest nearly complete skeleton at 10,000 years old, is revealed for the first time and with unprecedented accuracy by UCL and Natural History Museum researchers. The results indicate that Cheddar Man had blue eyes, dark coloured curly hair and 'dark to black' skin pigmentation.
Astronomy - History/Archeology
05.02.2018
Colourful photo reveals cannibalism in galaxy cluster
Colourful photo reveals cannibalism in galaxy cluster
Astronomers have managed to take unusually colourful images of a group of galaxies using a telescope in Hawaii. The photos reveal new facts about this spectacular galaxy cluster. Remnants of star matter attest to a phenomenon known as galactic cannibalism. Colourful clutter of both distant galaxies and foregrounded stars in our own galaxy.
History/Archeology
02.02.2018
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age
A team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead. Although the remains were initially thought to be associated with the Vikings, radiocarbon dates seemed to suggest the grave consisted of bones collected over several centuries.
Life Sciences - History/Archeology
31.01.2018
Reconstructing an ancient lethal weapon
Reconstructing an ancient lethal weapon
Archaeologists are a little like forensic investigators: They scour the remains of past societies, looking for clues in pottery, tools and bones about how people lived, and how they died. And just as detectives might re-create the scene of a crime, University of Washington archaeologists have re-created the weapons used by hunter-gatherers in the post-Ice Age Arctic some 14,000 years ago.
Art and Design - History/Archeology
25.01.2018
Major Robert Burns Research Revealed - 50 songs were not by Scotland's national bard
Major Robert Burns Research Revealed - 50 songs were not by Scotland’s national bard
Some 50 airs in an 18th century landmark publication credited with saving Scotland's folk song tradition were not by Robert Burns, according to new University of Glasgow research. The songs are among 200 out of the 600 tunes included in The Scots Musical Museum attributed to Scotland's national bard.
History/Archeology - Earth Sciences
24.01.2018
Frozen in time: glacial archaeology on the roof of Norway
Frozen in time: glacial archaeology on the roof of Norway
Artefacts revealed by melting ice patches in the high mountains of Oppland shed new light on ancient high-altitude hunting.  Town-dwellers needed mountain products such as antlers for artefact manufacture and probably also furs James Barrett Climate change is one of the most important issues facing people today and year on year the melting of glacial ice patches in Scandinavia, the Alps and North America reveals and then destroys vital archaeological records of past human activity.
Life Sciences - History/Archeology
17.01.2018
Origins of the Bornean elephant
The mystery behind the origins of the Bornean elephant has been uncovered by collaborative research between Cardiff University and researchers across the globe. How the endangered species of elephants came to live in Borneo has been unknown, until a recent study discovered part of the story, finding that elephants might have migrated between the Sunda Islands in Southeast Asia during low sea levels.
Life Sciences - History/Archeology
03.01.2018
Direct genetic evidence of founding population reveals story of first Native Americans
Direct genetic evidence of founding population reveals story of first Native Americans
Direct genetic traces of the earliest Native Americans have been identified for the first time in a new study. The genetic evidence suggests that people may have entered the continent in a single migratory wave, perhaps arriving more than 20,000 years ago.
History/Archeology - Business/Economics
18.12.2017
Calf's foot jelly and a tankard of ale? Welcome to the 18th century Starbucks
Calf’s foot jelly and a tankard of ale? Welcome to the 18th century Starbucks
Researchers have published details of the largest collection of artefacts from an early English coffeehouse ever discovered. Described as an 18th century equivalent of Starbucks, the finds nonetheless suggest that it may have been less like a café, and more like an inn. Coffee houses were important social centres during the 18th century.
History/Archeology - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.12.2017
Ancient faeces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts
Ancient faeces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts
Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms infecting the ancient inhabitants of Greece confirms descriptions found in writings associated with Hippocrates, the early physician and 'father of Western medicine'.
History/Archeology - Law/Forensics
14.12.2017
New image brings people face to face with Seventeenth Century Scottish soldier
New image brings people face to face with Seventeenth Century Scottish soldier
New image brings people face to face with Seventeenth Century Scottish soldier (14 December 2017) The face of one of the Seventeenth Century Scottish soldiers who was imprisoned and died in Durham following the Battle of Dunbar in 1650 has been revealed through a remarkable new digital reconstruction.
Psychology - History/Archeology
10.12.2017
Industrial Revolution left a damaging psychological ’imprint’ on today’s populations
Study finds people in areas historically reliant on coal-based industries have more 'negative' personality traits. Psychologists suggest this cognitive die may well have been cast at the dawn of the industrial age.
Psychology - History/Archeology
10.12.2017
Industrial Revolution: damaging psychological ’imprint’ persists in today’s populations
Study finds people in areas historically reliant on coal-based industries have more 'negative' personality traits. Psychologists suggest this cognitive die may well have been cast at the dawn of the industrial age.
History/Archeology - Life Sciences
07.12.2017
New insights into life and death of Jumbo the elephant revealed in BBC One documentary
New insights into the life and mysterious death of Jumbo the elephant - a celebrity animal superstar whose story is said to have inspired the film ‘Dumbo' - will be revealed in a BBC One documentary hosted by Sir David Attenborough and featuring a University of Nottingham archaeologist on Sunday 10 December.
History/Archeology - Religions
05.12.2017
Could ancient bones suggest Santa was real?
New Oxford University research has revealed that bones long venerated as relics of the saint, do in fact date from the right historical period. One of the most revered Christian saints, St Nicholas' remains are held in the Basilica di San Nicola, Bari, Southern Puglia, since 1087, where they are buried in a crypt beneath a marble altar, with others preserved in the Chiesa di San Nicolo al Lido in Venice.
History/Archeology
04.12.2017
New study proposes greater sharing of data between farmers and archaeologists
New study proposes greater sharing of data between farmers and archaeologists
A Bristol-led study suggests that developments in precision farming could yield data of great use to archaeological research, and that archaeological data could be valuable for modern farming systems. In a paper published in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences , lead researcher Henry Webber , a PhD student in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, surveys the different data types and methodological processes involved in modern precision farming systems and explores ‘how potentially interconnected these systems are with the archaeological community'.
Earth Sciences - History/Archeology
01.12.2017
Bronze Age artifacts used meteoric iron
You may already be surprised to hear there are iron objects dating back to the Bronze Age, but their meteorite origin is even more astonishing. Though meteorites had already been recognized as one source of this metal, the scientific community couldn't determine whether they accounted for most or simply a few Bronze Age iron artifacts.
History/Archeology - Physics/Materials Science
29.11.2017
Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today’s elite rowing teams
The first study to compare ancient and living female bones shows the routine manual labour of women during early agricultural eras was more gruelling than the physical demands of rowing in Cambridge University's famously competitive boat clubs. Researchers von der University of Cambridge und der Anthropologe Ron Pinhasi von der Universität Wien say the findings suggest a "hidden history" of women's work stretching across millennia.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 22 Next »