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History / Archeology - Physics - 16:38
Revolutionary new method for dating pottery sheds new light on prehistoric past
Revolutionary new method for dating pottery sheds new light on prehistoric past
The exciting new method Europe and Africa. Archaeological pottery has been used to date archaeological sites for more than a century, and from the Roman period onwards can offer quite precise dating. But further back in time, for example at the prehistoric sites of the earliest Neolithic farmers, accurate dating becomes more difficult because the kinds of pottery are often less distinctive and there are no coins or historical records to give context.

History / Archeology - Materials Science - 31.03.2020
Mesoamerican copper smelting technology aided colonial weaponry
Mesoamerican copper smelting technology aided colonial weaponry
Spanish conquerors depended on indigenous expertise to keep up their munitions supplies, archaeologists have found. When Spanish invaders arrived in the Americas, they were generally able to subjugate the local peoples thanks, in part, to their superior weaponry and technology. But archeological evidence indicates that, in at least one crucial respect, the Spaniards were quite dependent on an older indigenous technology in parts of Mesoamerica (today's Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras).

History / Archeology - Politics - 16.03.2020
Five things to ’dig’ about heritage at Durham
Our researchers are the history detectives, unearthing exciting things from our past and helping us learn from our ancestors. We are also the home to important cultural archives available for study. Here's From finding long a lost medieval chapel fit for a king, to discovering documents from our royal past.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 09.02.2020
People from Ghent University and Van Eyck: archaeometry
People from Ghent University and Van Eyck: archaeometry
Ghent's focus is on Van Eyck and the Ghent Altarpiece in 2020. Lots of people from Ghent University are also involved in this year of celebration. We have been putting a number of them in the spotlight. This week: Peter Vandenabeele. In Ghent, it's all about Van Eyck and the Ghent Altarpiece in 2020.

Business / Economics - History / Archeology - 05.02.2020
The complex effects of colonial rule in Indonesia
The complex effects of colonial rule in Indonesia
Evidence links Dutch-era sugar production and greater economic activity today. The areas of Indonesia where Dutch colonial rulers built a huge sugar-producing industry in the 1800s remain more economically productive today than other parts of the country, according to a study co-authored by an MIT economist.

History / Archeology - 29.01.2020
Iron Age ’warrior’ burial uncovered in West Sussex
A richly-furnished grave belonging to an Iron Age 'warrior' buried 2,000 years ago has been uncovered in West Sussex by UCL archaeologists. Iron weapons had been placed inside the grave, including a sword in a highly-decorated scabbard and a spear.   The burial was discovered during an excavation commissioned by Linden Homes, who are developing a site on the outskirts of Walberton, near Chichester, to create 175 new homes.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 27.01.2020
Debunks myth of Native American lost civilization
A UC Berkeley archaeologist has dug up ancient human feces, among other demographic clues, to challenge the narrative around the legendary demise of Cahokia, North America's most iconic pre-Columbian metropolis. In its heyday in the 1100s, Cahokia - located in what is now southern Illinois - was the center for Mississippian culture and home to tens of thousands of Native Americans who farmed, fished, traded and built giant ritual mounds.

History / Archeology - 26.01.2020
People from Ghent University and Van Eyck: art sciences and social history
People from Ghent University and Van Eyck: art sciences and social history
In Ghent, it's all about Van Eyck and the Ghent Altarpiece in 2020. One of the highlights is undoubtedly the return of the restored painting to St. Bavo's cathedral.

History / Archeology - 15.01.2020
The colours of the Pachacamac idol, an Inca God, finally revealed
The colours of the Pachacamac idol, an Inca God, finally revealed
Researchers from the CNRS, Sorbonne Université, université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle and the Musée du Quai Branly - Jacques Chirac have shown colours formerly painted on the Pachacamac idol, a 15th century Inca God and oracle. Paired with the first carbon 14 dating of the object, these results published in PLOS ONE on 15 January 2020 shed light on colour practices, and how important they were in the Andes at that time.

History / Archeology - Materials Science - 19.12.2019
New archaeological discoveries reveal birch bark tar was used in medieval England
New archaeological discoveries reveal birch bark tar was used in medieval England
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the British Museum, in collaboration with Oxford Archaeology East and Canterbury Archaeological Trust, have, for the first time, identified the use of birch bark tar in medieval England - the use of which was previously thought to be limited to prehistory.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 02.12.2019
1940s blood samples reveal historical spread of malaria
DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to the Americas during the colonial period, finds a new study co-led by UCL. The research published in Molecular Biology and Evolution reports the genome sequence of a malaria parasite sourced from blood-stained medical microscope slides used in 1944 in Spain, one of the last footholds of malaria in Europe.

Materials Science - History / Archeology - 13.11.2019
Finest handwork
Finest handwork
In autumn 2017, the archaeological service of the Canton of Berne was amazed when two private individuals delivered a crusted lump of metal. The bronze hand of Prêles, decorated with a ribbon of gold, turned out to be the oldest bronze sculpture of a human body part in Central Europe. But where did the metals of the sensational find come from? Empa researchers were involved in the investigation.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 07.11.2019
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Scholars have been all over Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets - for instance, relatively little is known about where the city's denizens actually came from. Now, an international team led by Researchers from the University of Vienna, Stanford University and Sapienza University of Rome, is filling in the gaps with a genetic history that shows just how much the Eternal City's populace mirrored its sometimes tumultuous history.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 05.11.2019
3,000-year-old Egyptian wheat genome sequenced for first time
3,000-year-old Egyptian wheat genome sequenced for first time
The genome of an ancient Egyptian wheat has been sequenced for the first time by a UCL-led team, revealing historical patterns of crop movement and domestication. The study was carried out by an international research team, which mapped the genetic code from a sample of wheat harvested over 3,000 years ago, that was excavated in 1924 from the Hememiah North Spur site in Egypt.

History / Archeology - 08.10.2019
Oldest surviving fragments of 13th century's most popular story uncovered
Oldest surviving fragments of 13th century’s most popular story uncovered
The oldest surviving pages of the 13th century's most popular story which feature one of medieval European literature's best-known sex scenes have been identified by an academic from the University of Bristol. Le Roman de la Rose or The Romance of the Rose - famously translated and adapted by Geoffrey Chaucer, author of The Canterbury Tales, a century later - is a medieval French poem styled as an allegorical dream vision.

Computer Science / Telecom - History / Archeology - 02.10.2019
Deepest layers of Bruegel drawings
On the occasion of the 450th anniversary of Pieter Bruegel the Elder's death, the city of Brussels is organising an exhibition on a few of the master's original drawings as well as a unique series of prints based on these drawings.

History / Archeology - 25.09.2019
First evidence for early baby bottles used to feed animal milk to prehistoric babies
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has found the first evidence that prehistoric babies were fed animal milk using the equivalent of modern-day baby bottles. Possible infant feeding vessels, made from clay, first appear in Europe in the Neolithic (at around 5,000 BC), becoming more commonplace throughout the Bronze and Iron Ages.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 10.09.2019
9,000-Year-Old Grave with Rich Grave Goods in Jordan Yields New Insights into Early Hierarchies
9,000-Year-Old Grave with Rich Grave Goods in Jordan Yields New Insights into Early Hierarchies
Prospective Students Students and Doctorate Alumni and Supporters Continuing Education International research team led by Freie Universität publishes results of a two-year study No 263/2019 from Sep 10, 2019 An international team of researchers led by a team from Freie Universität Berlin has excavated a 9,000-year-old grave and its contents in the south of Jordan and interpreted the findings.

History / Archeology - Religions - 09.09.2019
Skeletons yield clues about 19th-century immigrant life in New Haven
Skeletons yield clues about 19th-century immigrant life in New Haven
On July 12, 2011, a human bone was discovered jutting from a drainage trench at a construction site at Yale New Haven Hospital. The New Haven police and state coroner were called, but it was no crime scene. Michael Massella, a security officer on duty at the hospital, contacted his co-worker Anthony Griego, a retired New Haven police officer and local historian.

History / Archeology - Environment - 30.08.2019
Humans were changing the planet earlier than we knew
Humans were changing the planet earlier than we knew
Humans had caused significant landcover change on Earth up to 4000 years earlier than previously thought, University of Queensland researchers have found. The School of Social Sciences ' Dr Andrea Kay said some scientists defined the Anthropocene as starting in the 20th century, but the new research showed human-induced landcover change was globally extensive by 2000BC.
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