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History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 15.10.2018
Parasites from medieval latrines unlock secrets of human history
A radical new approach combining archaeology, genetics and microscopy can reveal long-forgotten secrets of human diet, sanitation and movement from studying parasites in ancient poo. Researchers at the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology and School of Archaeology have applied genetic analysis to 700-year-old parasites found in archaeological stool samples to understand a variety of characteristics of a human population.

History / Archeology - Computer Science / Telecom - 03.10.2018
Scientists ’virtually unravel’ burnt 16th century scroll
Scientists are on the look-out for damaged and unreadable ancient scrolls as brand new techniques have revealed the hidden text inside a severely burnt 16th century sample. The new development, the latest in a long line of advancements in the field in recent years, has shown how ‘virtual unravelling' can be achieved using a more autonomous approach and with scrolls that contain multiple pages.

History / Archeology - 25.09.2018
Painted tomb discovered in Cumae (Italy) : A banquet frozen in time
Painted tomb discovered in Cumae (Italy) : A banquet frozen in time
At the foot of the hill on which sits the ancient city of Cumae, in the region of Naples, Priscilla Munzi, CNRS researcher at the Jean Bérard Centre (CNRS-EFR), and Jean-Pierre Brun, professor at the Collège de France, are exploring a Roman-era necropolis. They now reveal the latest discovery to surface in the archaeological dig they have led since 2001: a painted tomb from the 2nd century B.C. In excellent condition, the tomb depicts a banquet scene, fixed by pigments.

History / Archeology - 19.09.2018
SE Asian population boom 4,000 years ago
SE Asian population boom 4,000 years ago
Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have uncovered a previously unconfirmed population boom across South East Asia that occurred 4,000 years ago, thanks to a new method for measuring prehistoric population growth. Using the new population measurement method, which utilises human skeletal remains, they have been able to prove a significant rapid increase in growth across populations in Thailand, China and Vietnam during the Neolithic Period, and a second subsequent rise in the Iron Age.

Business / Economics - History / Archeology - 12.09.2018
Works of Art Called "Degenerate Art" from Collections of Art Dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt Were Catalogued
Published in Scholarly Database at Freie Universität Berlin No 236/2018 from Sep 12, 2018 The works acquired by the art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt during the period of National Socialism in Germany that were officially ostracized as "degenerate art" have been fully catalogued in a database.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 12.09.2018
Did crafting beer lead to cereal cultivation?
Stanford researchers have found the oldest archaeological evidence of beer brewing, a discovery that supports the hypothesis that in some regions, beer may have been an underlying motivation to cultivate cereals. Standing in the entrance to Raqefet Cave, where they found evidence for the oldest man-made alcohol in the world, are, from left, Dani Nadel, Li Liu, Jiajing Wang and Hao Zhao.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 22.08.2018
Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo caused in part by Indonesian volcanic eruption
Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo caused in part by Indonesian volcanic eruption
Electrically charged volcanic ash short-circuited Earth's atmosphere in 1815, causing global poor weather and Napoleon's defeat, says new research. Historians know that rainy and muddy conditions helped the Allied army defeat the French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo. The June 1815 event changed the course of European history.

Environment - History / Archeology - 10.08.2018
Laziness helped lead to extinction of Homo erectus
Laziness helped lead to extinction of Homo erectus
New archaeological research from The Australian National University (ANU) has found that Homo erectus , an extinct species of primitive humans, went extinct in part because they were 'lazy'. An archaeological excavation of ancient human populations in the Arabian Peninsula during the Early Stone Age, found that Homo erectus used 'least-effort strategies' for tool making and collecting resources.

History / Archeology - 02.08.2018
New evidence on the origins of people buried at Stonehenge
New evidence on the origins of people buried at Stonehenge
People buried at Stonehenge 5,000 years ago likely lived in west Wales where Stonehenge's smaller standing stones - bluestones - originated from, according to a new study involving UCL, University of Oxford, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle de Paris, France. The study, published in Nature Scientific Reports , suggests that a number of people buried at the Wessex site had moved with and likely transported the bluestones, which were sourced from the Preseli Mountains in west Wales and used in the early construction of Stonehenge.

History / Archeology - 02.08.2018
Epic issues: epic poetry from the dawn of modernity
Epic issues: epic poetry from the dawn of modernity
Epic poems telling of cultures colliding, deeply conflicted identities and a fast-changing world were written by the Greeks under Roman rule in the first to the sixth centuries CE. Now, the first comprehensive study of these vast, complex texts is casting new light on the era that saw the dawn of Western modernity.   Each poem was trying to say something about its topic for eternity.

History / Archeology - 01.08.2018
New light shed on the people who built Stonehenge
Despite over a century of intense study, we still know very little about the people buried at Stonehenge or how they came to be there. Now suggests that a number of the people that were buried at the Wessex site had moved with and likely transported the bluestones used in the early stages of the monument's construction, sourced from the Preseli Mountains of west Wales.

History / Archeology - 26.07.2018
Historian uncovers new evidence of 18th century London’s ’Child Support Agency’
How 18th and 19th century London supported its unmarried mothers and illegitimate children - essentially establishing an earlier version of today's Child Support Agency - is the subject of newly-published research by a Cambridge historian.

History / Archeology - 26.07.2018
Making thread in Bronze Age Britain
Bronze Age Britons spliced plant fibres together to make cloth rather than spinning, a new study has found. The study, published this week in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences identified that the earliest plant fibre technology for making thread in Early Bronze Age Britain and across Europe and the Near East was splicing not spinning.

History / Archeology - 18.07.2018
Old Theban port of Chalcis : A medieval maritime crossroads in Greece
Old Theban port of Chalcis : A medieval maritime crossroads in Greece
Showcased in museums the world over, Byzantine ceramics are the vestiges of an ancient empire that dominated the Mediterranean region for nearly ten centuries. One CNRS researcher 1 , in cooperation with Greek colleagues 2 , has focused her attention on a widely disseminated style of ceramics called the “main Middle Byzantine Production,” found in all four corners of the Mediterranean.

Agronomy / Food Science - History / Archeology - 16.07.2018
Bread predates agriculture by 4,000 years, discover archaeologists
The charred remains of a flatbread baked by hunter-gatherers over 14,000 years ago has been discovered in north-eastern Jordan by a team of researchers from UCL, University of Copenhagen and University of Cambridge. It is the oldest direct evidence of bread found to date, predating the advent of agriculture by at least 4,000 years.

History / Archeology - 14.07.2018
Gilded mummy mask
Gilded mummy mask
German-Egyptian team presents the latest findings from Saqqara excavations Researchers at the University of Tübingen have discovered a gilded mask on the mummy of a priest in Saqqara, Egypt. It is from the Saite-Persian period (664-404 BCE). The head of the German-Egyptian team, Dr. Ramadan Badry Hussein, reported on Saturday that the mask was found in an extensive tomb complex which Tübingen archaeologists have been investigating since 2016, using the latest methods.

History / Archeology - Literature / Linguistics - 12.07.2018
Mystery of the Basel papyrus solved
Mystery of the Basel papyrus solved
Since the 16th century, Basel has been home to a mysterious papyrus. With mirror writing on both sides, it has puzzled generations of researchers. A research team from the University of Basel has now discovered that it is an unknown medical document from late antiquity. The text was likely written by the famous Roman physician Galen.

History / Archeology - Art and Design - 05.07.2018
The Visible Invisible: Q&A with Stephanie Syjuco
The Visible Invisible: Q&A with Stephanie Syjuco
Why is UC Berkeley Assistant Professor Stephanie Syjuco sewing American historical garments - all of them bright green - at her Richmond Field Station art studio while researching Hollywood Civil War movies? She's preparing an eye-catching, thought-provoking exhibit that opens in November at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C. Berkeley News recently visited with Syjuco, who is internationally known for her large-scale sculptures and installations that combine handcrafting methods with digital technologies and social engagement.

History / Archeology - 04.07.2018
New study questions when the brown bear became extinct in Britain
PA 143/18 New research provides insights into the extinction of Britain's largest native carnivore. The study - ‘ The Presence of the brown bear in Holocene Britain: a review of the evidence' published in Mammal Review - is the first of its kind to collate and evaluate the evidence for the brown bear in post-Ice Age Britain.

History / Archeology - 03.07.2018
Archaeologists reveal castle’s medieval secrets
Volunteers, students and staff at the Auckland Castle excavation site. Credit: Jamie Sproates, courtesy of The Auckland Project. Medieval mysteries, hidden beneath the grounds of a 900-year-old British castle, have been uncovered during a major archaeological excavation. More than 90 archaeologists, undergraduate and postgraduate students, and volunteers from Durham University and The Auckland Project spent a month peeling back the centuries at Auckland Castle, Bishop Auckland, as part of the latest excavation at the former home of the powerful Prince Bishops of Durham.
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