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History / Archeology - Chemistry - 27.09.2022
Scientific analysis of Germany's oldest beer
Scientific analysis of Germany’s oldest beer
Study shows molecular profile of 19th-century beer sample Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have opened a sample of lager beer that was stored at constant room temperature for over 140 years. The beer, brewed in 1885, was analyzed in terms of its sensory properties and chemical composition.

Environment - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Ancient footprints on UK beach record demise of a biodiversity hotspot
A team of archaeologists and geographers from The University of Manchester have discovered that hundreds of ancient animal and human footprints found on a beach in Merseyside record a major decline in large animal diversity in Ancient Britain. Their new research, published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution , includes a new programme of radiocarbon dating which shows that the most species-rich footprint beds at Formby Point are much older than previously thought.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Further finds from an infant burial in Italy provides insights on the use of baby carriers and family heirlooms in prehistory, an UdeM-led study reveals. CONTENU - It seems logical enough: even in their earliest history, humans must have needed something to carry their babies around in as they moved from place to place.

Environment - History / Archeology - 22.09.2022
Past climate of Cape Town revealed in study
New insights into the history of South Africa's climate have been revealed. In a project that spanned seven years, the Tracing History Trust, with support from Cardiff University and Wits University, has digitised and transcribed the Dutch East India Company's day registers which were written between 1652 to 1791.

History / Archeology - 19.09.2022
Google Maps for 14th to 17th century trade routes
If you would like to know how long it took to get from Eindhoven to Deventer around 600 years ago, the updated version of Viabundus - which is like a variation of Google Maps for the 1350-1650 period - can be used to calculate just how much time was needed. One of the things that the project's researchers managed to achieve this year was a more accurate map of Brabant's road network.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 15.09.2022
Beads show European trade in African interior used Indigenous routes
Beads show European trade in African interior used Indigenous routes
Tiny glass beads discovered in mountain caves about 25 miles from the shores of Lake Malawi in eastern-central Africa provide evidence that European trade in the continent's hinterland was built on Indigenous trade routes from the coast to the interior that had existed for centuries, according to a study co-authored by Yale anthropologist Jessica Thompson.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 15.09.2022
Beads from African interior reveal traces of European exploitation
Beads from African interior reveal traces of European exploitation
Tiny glass beads discovered in mountain caves about 25 miles from the shores of Lake Malawi in eastern-central Africa provide evidence that European trade in the continent's hinterland was built on Indigenous trade routes from the coast to the interior that had existed for centuries, according to a study co-authored by Yale anthropologist Jessica Thompson.

History / Archeology - 14.09.2022
New data on how Levantine art was made and how it has been preserved to date
New data on how Levantine art was made and how it has been preserved to date
Although Levantine art has been recognized as World Heritage rock art and Asset of Cultural Interest by the UNESCO, we still have little information on how these cave paintings, typical of the Mediterranean area about 7,500 years ago, were made. Now, a study published in the journal PLOS ONE on the Levantine art site in el Carche (Valencia, Spain) identifies for the first time four different formulas used by the prehistoric communities to get paint by mixing minerals.

History / Archeology - Art and Design - 12.09.2022
Gold of the Golden Coach originates from Suriname
Gold of the Golden Coach originates from Suriname
Together with the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands Institute for Conservation+Art+Science+ (NICAS) and Naturalis Biodiversity Center, the Amsterdam Museum conducted research into the origin of the gold of the Golden Coach. Where the gold leaf with which the coach is gilded came from has long been unknown.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 09.09.2022
The origins of donkey domestication
The origins of donkey domestication
The donkey has shaped the history of humankind, both as a source of power for farm work, and of transportation in sometimes hard to reach areas. To understand the history of the donkey's domestication, teams at the Centre for Anthropobiology and Genomics of Toulouse (CNRS/ UniversitÚ Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier) and scientists 1 from 37 laboratories around the world worked together to build and analyse the most complete panel of genomes ever studied for this animal.

History / Archeology - 06.09.2022
University of Warwick highlights the long struggle for scientific freedom in Ukraine
University of Warwick highlights the long struggle for scientific freedom in Ukraine
Historians show that Ukraine has been an important centre for scientific research over the past 150 years. Ukraine has also been at the heart of the struggle for scientific freedom. Understanding this history can help plan for the future of science in Ukraine. In a comment article in leading science journal, Nature , researchers at the University of Warwick highlight the long struggle for scientific freedom in Ukraine.

History / Archeology - Politics - 05.09.2022
New research highlights the Dutch role in Holocaust reparations negotiations
New research highlights the Dutch role in Holocaust reparations negotiations
Historian Lorena De Vita unravels impact of local and global security issues of 1952 In 1952, now 70 years ago, Wassenaar was the scene of a historic breakthrough.

History / Archeology - 02.09.2022
Researchers present Prime Minister Rutte with book on the parliamentary history of the 1970s
The issues that arose in the 1970s share striking similarities with our current crises, from energy crises and inflation to concerns about the quality of life on earth. Researchers from Radboud University have written a book about how Dutch parliament dealt with these issues in the 1970s. On 1 September, Prime Minister Rutte was presented with the first copy of this book.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 29.08.2022
Oldest case of a rare genetic condition discovered
Oldest case of a rare genetic condition discovered
A 1,000-year-old skeleton from Portugal has been uncovered with a rare genetic condition that gives men an extra X chromosome. A group of international researchers has uncovered evidence of a super rare genetic condition that gives men an extra X chromosome, reporting the oldest clinical case of Klinefelter Syndrome to date.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 25.08.2022
The Data that Keep on Giving
A 2016 Excavation in Greece Helps Provide Sweeping New Insights into the Evolution of Indo-European Languages Genetic data collected during an excavation of a Mycenaean tomb at Kastrouli near Delphi, Greece, have helped an interdisciplinary team including UC San Diego scientists unveil some of the mysteries of ancient patterns of human migration, culture and the evolution of Indo-European languages across eastern Europe and into West Asia 7,000 to 5,000 years ago.

Health - History / Archeology - 19.08.2022
Medieval monks were 'riddled with worms'
Medieval monks were ’riddled with worms’
Research examining traces of parasites in the remains of medieval Cambridge residents suggests that local friars were almost twice as likely as ordinary working townspeople to have intestinal worms - despite monasteries of the period having far more sanitary facilities. One possibility is that the friars manured their vegetable gardens with human faeces Piers Mitchell A new analysis of remains from medieval Cambridge shows that local Augustinian friars were almost twice as likely as the city's general population to be infected by intestinal parasites.

Paleontology - History / Archeology - 18.08.2022
April the museum dinosaur still revealing new discoveries
April the museum dinosaur still revealing new discoveries
Recent research regarding a dinosaur nicknamed April which previously called Manchester Museum home has revealed rare new findings. Scientists made the discovery of gastroliths (stomach stones) inside the Tenontosaurus which is unusually rare. This represents the second oldest occurrence of gastroliths in an ornithopod dinosaur and the first to be identified in a more derived ornithopod.

History / Archeology - 10.08.2022
Prehistoric Brits used rare rock crystals to mark burial sites
Prehistoric Brits used rare rock crystals to mark burial sites
Distinctive and rare rock crystals were moved over long distances by Early Neolithic Brits and were used to mark their burial sites, according to groundbreaking new archaeological research. Evidence for the use of rock crystal - a rare type of perfectly transparent quartz which forms in large hexagonal gems - has occasionally been found at prehistoric sites in the British Isles, but little investigation has previously been done specifically into how the material was used and its potential significance.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 03.08.2022
Global Spread of Powdery Mildew through Migration and Trade
Global Spread of Powdery Mildew through Migration and Trade
The worldwide distribution of one of the most important cereal pathogens is the result of human activity. Researchers at the University of Zurich have traced the history and spread of wheat powdery mildew along wheat trade routes and found that mixing of genetic ancestries of related powdery mildew species played a central role in the evolution and adaptation of the pathogen.

Chemistry - History / Archeology - 01.08.2022
Researchers study historical developments of the periodic system of chemical elements
Researchers study historical developments of the periodic system of chemical elements
In the 1860s, the chemists, Lothar Meyer and Dmitri Mendeleev, independently presented the first periodic system. Since then, the well-known tabular arrangement of the elements has been the guiding principle of chemistry. A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences and the Interdisciplinary Center for Bioinformatics at the University of Leipzig provides computational approaches based on extensive data sets from the Reaxys chemistry database that explain the development of the first periodic systems.
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