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Results 21 - 40 of 842.


History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 30.04.2024
Beating the Plateau
Weizmann Institute researchers establish absolute chronology for Kingdom of Judah's Jerusalem Jerusalem has been inhabited continuously for thousands of years, serving as both a center of religious significance and a seat of power for kingdoms, yet despite the vast number of historical texts about the city, there are still gaps in its absolute chronology.

Computer Science - History / Archeology - 25.04.2024
Early Christian Altar Stone: Swarm Intelligence to Help with Reconstruction
Early Christian Altar Stone: Swarm Intelligence to Help with Reconstruction
Researchers from TU Graz and the University of Graz have digitised a broken altar stone from Lavant so that citizens can put it together on the internet. The aim is to achieve what generations of archaeologists have failed to do. The Bishop's church at Kirchbichl in Lavant in East Tyrol is one of the most important early Christian monuments in Austria.

Environment - History / Archeology - 24.04.2024
On the trail of pollution in Lausanne
On the trail of pollution in Lausanne
A team of researchers from EPFL, UNIL, and UnisantÚ have published a report that goes through about the legacy of pollution from a trash incinerator that burned in the Lausanne Vallon neighborhood from 1958 to 2005.

History / Archeology - 24.04.2024
Social change may explain decline in genetic diversity of the Y chromosome at the end of the Neolithic period
Social change may explain decline in genetic diversity of the Y chromosome at the end of the Neolithic period
The emergence in the Neolithic of patrilineal 1 social systems, in which children are affiliated with their father's lineage, may explain a spectacular decline in the genetic diversity of the Y chromosome 2 observed worldwide between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago. In a study to be published on 24 April in Nature Communications, a team of scientists from the CNRS, MNHN and UniversitÚ Paris CitÚ 3 suggest that these patrilineal organisations had a greater impact on the Y chromosome than mortality during conflict.

Health - History / Archeology - 23.04.2024
What height says about the development of our prosperity and health
What height says about the development of our prosperity and health
As a boy, did you grow up among sisters in around 1850? Then you probably grew taller than a boy who only had brothers. Someone's height says a lot about the quality of life in their first 20 years. Malnutrition, disease and hard labour can inhibit people's growth. Historian Bj÷rn Quanjer studied how the height of Dutch men between 1850 and 1950 was influenced by the households in which they grew up.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 22.04.2024
Climate change in the early Middle Ages triggered by volcanic eruptions in Iceland
Icebergs on the Bosporus and a frozen Black Sea: an international study by the University of Bern with the participation of the Austrian Academy of Sciences shows how volcanic eruptions on Iceland influenced the European climate in the early Middle Ages and led to severe winter cooling anomalies. It was one of the coldest winters the region has ever experienced: In 763, large parts of the Black Sea froze over and icebergs were sighted on the Boporus.

History / Archeology - Environment - 18.04.2024
Secrets of cave from the Early Upper Palaeolithic, when Neanderthals and the first Homo sapiens co-existed
Secrets of cave from the Early Upper Palaeolithic, when Neanderthals and the first Homo sapiens co-existed
VUB researcher reveals secrets of cave from the Early Upper Palaeolithic, when Neanderthals and the first Homo sapiens co-existed Mughr el-Hamamah, meaning "pigeon cave" in Arabic, is a site in northwestern Jordan, renowned for its prehistoric findings dating between 39,000 and 45,000 years old. Numerous stone tools, hearths, and animal and hominin bones have been excavated there.

History / Archeology - Religions - 18.04.2024
Antisemitism in the history of Raiffeisen?
Antisemitism in the history of Raiffeisen?
On behalf of Raiffeisen Switzerland Cooperative, researchers examined the beginnings of the Raiffeisen movement in Switzerland. Their focus was on antisemitism as well as Raiffeisen during National Socialism. Raiffeisen Group in Switzerland today has 219 cooperative Raiffeisen banks. It is based on the cooperative movement started by F.W. Raiffeisen in Germany around 1860.

History / Archeology - Computer Science - 12.04.2024
Prehistoric eyed idols spread across the Iberian Peninsula from the Serpis River basin, according to a study with Artificial Intelligence
Prehistoric eyed idols spread across the Iberian Peninsula from the Serpis River basin, according to a study with Artificial Intelligence
A Digital Archaeology pioneering study has revealed that the eyed idols of the Iberian Peninsula, prehistoric figures carved from long bones that represent eye-shaped motifs, had their original focus in the south of the current province of Valencia and the north from that of Alicante, specifically the basin of the Serpis river, and from there they expanded to those of the Tajo-J¨car rivers, and also towards the Segura-Guadiana.

History / Archeology - 05.04.2024
A protohistoric burial site at Marliens (C˘te-d’Or)
Inrap archaeologists conducted an excavation at Marliens, some twenty kilometers east of Dijon, prior to the extension of a gravel pit (Eqiom) in the Ouche valley, a tributary of the Sa˘ne. The three excavated areas, representing a total surface area of 60,000 m┬▓, yielded a series of occupations ranging from the Neolithic to the Early Iron Age.

History / Archeology - 05.04.2024
Make yourself at home... 40,000 years ago
Make yourself at home... 40,000 years ago
An UdeM study unveils fresh insights into how Neanderthals and Homo sapiens organized their living spaces at the Riparo Bombrini site in northern Italy. How did our Paleolithic ancestors go about organizing their living spaces? In a study published in the Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, archeologists from UniversitÚ de MontrÚal and the University of Genoa reveal that far from being more primitive, Neanderthals did much the same as their Homo sapiens successors: made themselves at home.

History / Archeology - 03.04.2024
Finds at Sch÷ningen show wood was crucial raw material 300,000 years ago
Finds at Sch÷ningen show wood was crucial raw material 300,000 years ago
Research team discovers sophisticated processing of archaeological wood During archaeological excavations in the Sch÷ningen open-cast coal mine in 1994, the discovery of the oldest, remarkably well-preserved hunting weapons known to humanity caused an international sensation. Spears and a double-pointed throwing stick were found lying between animal bones about ten meters below the surface in deposits at a former lakeshore.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 02.04.2024
When Did the Chicken Cross the Road? New Evidence from Central Asia
When Did the Chicken Cross the Road? New Evidence from Central Asia
New research reveals that chickens were widely raised across southern Central Asia from 400 BCE through medieval periods and likely dispersed along the ancient Silk Road In a new study published by Nature Communications , an international team of scholars present the earliest clear archaeological and biomolecular evidence for the raising of chickens for egg production, based on material from 12 archaeological sites spanning one and a half millennia.

Innovation - History / Archeology - 01.04.2024
Most work is new work, long-term study of U.S. census data shows
The majority of U.S. jobs are in occupations that have emerged since 1940, MIT research finds - telling us much about the ways jobs are created and lost. This is part 1 of a two-part feature examining new job creation in the U.S. since 1940, based on new research from Ford Professor of Economics David Autor.

Health - History / Archeology - 29.03.2024
Crimean-Congo Fever: molecular mechanism of infection discovered
The Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus (CCHFV), first described in 1944, is also spreading rapidly in Europe due to global warming and is included in the WHO list of infectious agents with epidemic or pandemic potential as a top priority. There are currently no therapeutic or preventative measures available against the disease, which is mainly transmitted by ticks and is fatal in 40 per cent of cases.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 25.03.2024
Scientific Drilling Unravels Historical Mystery Surrounding Santorini
Scientific Drilling Unravels Historical Mystery Surrounding Santorini
Santorini is one of the best-studied volcanic archipelagos in the world. An international drilling expedition has now for the first time used a scientific drill ship to explore and investigate the seafloor around the Greek volcanic island. The researchers have uncovered evidence of an underwater eruption in 726 CE, previously known only from historical records.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 19.03.2024
Researchers uncover remarkable archive of ancient human brains
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Oxford has challenged previously held views that brain preservation in the archaeological record is extremely rare. The team carried out the largest study to date of the global archaeological literature about preserved human brains to compile an archive that exceeds 20-fold the number of brains previously compiled.

History / Archeology - Religions - 07.03.2024
Rabana-Merquly: Was the Mountain Fortress also a Parthian-Era Sanctuary?
Rabana-Merquly: Was the Mountain Fortress also a Parthian-Era Sanctuary?
Archaeological excavations in Iraqi Kurdistan point to a place of worship for the water goddess Anahita Besides being a fortress for military use, the ancient mountain settlement of Rabana-Merquly in

Environment - History / Archeology - 01.03.2024
Seeing the wood for the trees: using hazelnuts to reconstruct ancient woodlands
Seeing the wood for the trees: using hazelnuts to reconstruct ancient woodlands
Humans in northern Europe have been snacking on hazelnuts - a key accessible source of energy -for at least 12,000 years. Now, a study led by the University of Oxford has shown that it is possible to analyse the carbon isotope values of hazelnuts found at archaeological sites to reveal what the places humans lived in millennia ago looked like.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.02.2024
First DNA study of ancient Eastern Arabians reveals malaria adaptation
The first DNA study of the ancient population of Eastern Arabia sheds new light on their lives People living in ancient Eastern Arabia appear to have developed resistance to malaria following the appearance of agriculture in the region around five thousand years ago, a new study reveals. DNA analysis of the remains of four individuals from Tylos-period Bahrain (300 BCE to 600 CE) - the first ancient genomes from Eastern Arabia - revealed the malaria-protective G6PD Mediterranean mutation in three samples.