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Results 61 - 80 of 815.


History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 31.07.2023
The study of the prehistorical sambaqui community (eastern South America) shows their genetic diversity
The study of the prehistorical sambaqui community (eastern South America) shows their genetic diversity
An international research team lead by the University of Tübingen and the Brazilian University of São Paulo, with CIDEGENT researcher Domingo C. Salazar from the University of Valencia, compiled the largest genomic dataset from Brazil to demonstrate that sambaqui communities on the southern and southeastern coasts didn-t represent a genetically homogeneous population.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 31.07.2023
Family History at the Shell Mound
Family History at the Shell Mound
Researchers from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen and the Brazilian University of São Paulo, together with an international research team led by first author Dr. Tiago Ferraz, compiled the largest genomic dataset from Brazil to demonstrate that sambaqui communities on the southern and southeastern coasts did not represent a genetically homogeneous population.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 27.07.2023
New insights into the origin of the Indo-European languages
New insights into the origin of the Indo-European languages
Linguistics and genetics combine to suggest a new hybrid hypothesis for the origin of the Indo-European languages An international team of linguists and geneticists led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig has achieved a significant breakthrough in our understanding of the origins of Indo-European, a family of languages spoken by nearly half of the world's population.

History / Archeology - 24.07.2023
New discoveries on the wreck of Antikythera
New discoveries on the wreck of Antikythera
A team of Swiss and Greek archaeologists recently completed the third season of excavations on the wreck of Antikythera. The wreck of Antikythera was recently brought into the spotlight by the film Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny. Far from the cinematic imagination, an international team of archaeologists, divers, engineers and physical and natural scientists is currently excavating the famous wreck.

Chemistry - History / Archeology - 12.07.2023
Secrets of Egyptian painters revealed by chemistry
Secrets of Egyptian painters revealed by chemistry
Contrary to prior assumptions, ancient Egyptian painters did at times push the boundaries of convention. Artistic creations supposed to be copies of canonical images were in fact often adapted and reworked during their execution. This discovery was made using new, portable chemical imaging tools that leave the artworks intact.

History / Archeology - Environment - 06.07.2023
Giant stone artefacts found on rare Ice Age site in Kent
Giant stone artefacts found on rare Ice Age site in Kent
Researchers at the UCL Institute of Archaeology have discovered some of the largest early prehistoric stone tools in Britain. The excavations, which took place in Kent and were commissioned in advance of development of the Maritime Academy School in Frindsbury, revealed prehistoric artefacts in deep Ice Age sediments preserved on a hillside above the Medway Valley.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 28.06.2023
A study led by the University confirms that vipers inhabited the Columbretes Islands 2,600 years ago
A study led by the University confirms that vipers inhabited the Columbretes Islands 2,600 years ago
An international team led by Postdoctoral Researcher Margarita Salas of the University of Valencia Rafael Marquina, has studied the fossil remains of small vertebrates recovered from the Illa Grossa, the largest island of the archipelago of Columbretes.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.06.2023
The old grind just got a little older
The old grind just got a little older
An Italian study involving UdeM researchers shows new evidence that humans and Neanderthals milled flour as long as 43,000 years ago, several thousand years before what was previously thought, making Long before the invention of agriculture, humans already knew how to process cereals and other wild plants into a flour suitable for food - and now there's new evidence they did so long before scientists was previously thought.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 15.06.2023
Seeking the origin of indigenous languages in South America
Seeking the origin of indigenous languages in South America
A new study indicates that one of the largest of the indigenous language families in Latin America originated in the sixth century BCE in the basin of the Rio Tapajós and Rio Xingu, near the present-day city of Santarém in the Brazilian state of Pará. There are around fifty languages in the Tupí-Guaraní language family, which gave us words like -jaguar- and -piranha.

History / Archeology - Environment - 13.06.2023
Walls along River Nile reveal ancient form of hydraulic engineering
Walls along River Nile reveal ancient form of hydraulic engineering
An international team of researchers who discovered a vast network of stone walls along the River Nile in Egypt and Sudan say these massive 'river groynes' reveal an exceptionally long-lived form of hydraulic engineering in the Nile Valley, and shed light on connections between ancient Nubia and Egypt.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 12.06.2023
Domestic cattle and society: a tightly interlinked history of development
Domestic cattle and society: a tightly interlinked history of development
Meat, milk, labor: domestic cattle have a lot to offer. Their history is consequently closely intertwined with that of humankind. Researchers at the University of Basel have investigated the genetic development of this livestock animal in Switzerland, and it is linked with societal developments. Cows are part of the Swiss landscape, and their meat, milk and resulting products are inextricably linked with traditional Swiss cuisine.

History / Archeology - Environment - 09.06.2023
The first prehistoric wind instruments discovered in the Levant
The first prehistoric wind instruments discovered in the Levant
Although the prehistoric site of Eynan-Mallaha in northern Israel has been thoroughly examined since 1955, it still holds some surprises for scientists. Seven prehistoric wind instruments known as flutes, recently identified by a Franco-Israeli team 1 , are the subject of an article published on 9 June in Nature Scientific Reports .

History / Archeology - 09.06.2023
Trinity College prayer book belonged to Thomas Cromwell
Trinity College prayer book belonged to Thomas Cromwell
The Hardouyn Hours, a jewelled fifteenth-century prayer book in Trinity College Library belonged to Thomas Cromwell, chief minister to King Henry VIII, new research has found. The most exciting Cromwell discovery in a generation - if not more. Tracy Borman Hever Castle curator, Alison Palmer, recognised the bejewelled, silver gilt binding of Trinity's Book of Hours from the famous portrait of Thomas Cromwell painted by Hans Holbein the Younger in 1532-3, which hangs in the Frick Collection in New York.

History / Archeology - Health - 26.05.2023
Early toilets reveal dysentery in Old Testament Jerusalem
Early toilets reveal dysentery in Old Testament Jerusalem
Study of 2,500-year-old latrines from the biblical Kingdom of Judah shows the ancient faeces within contain Giardia - a parasite that can cause dysentery. Toilets with cesspits from this time are relatively rare and were usually made only for the elite Piers Mitchell A new analysis of ancient faeces taken from two Jerusalem latrines dating back to the biblical Kingdom of Judah has uncovered traces of a single-celled microorganism Giardia duodenalis - a common cause of debilitating diarrhoea in humans.

History / Archeology - 26.05.2023
Unique archaeological find in Thorikos
Unique archaeological find in Thorikos
Archaeologists from the University of Göttingen have discovered the earliest Iron Age house in Athens in Thorikos (Greece), south of Athens. This is an important, unexpected and unique finding for early Greek history: building structures from this early period, from the 10th to the 9th century BC, have never been excavated anywhere in Attica before.

History / Archeology - 24.05.2023
The elusive minority: non-binary gender in prehistoric Europe
The elusive minority: non-binary gender in prehistoric Europe
Research team at Göttingen University analyse data from burial sites spanning nearly 4,000 years People tend to think that the idea that biological sex is linked with one-s role in society belongs in the past. But was it even the case in prehistory? Archaeologists at the University of Göttingen have investigated the representation of gender in Neolithic and Bronze Age graves (around 5500 BC to 1200 BC), in order to understand if the idea of gender in prehistoric Europe was really as -binary- as might be expected.

History / Archeology - Environment - 19.05.2023
Oldest architectural plans detail mysterious desert mega structures
Oldest architectural plans detail mysterious desert mega structures
An international team of researchers including the University of Freiburg identifies engravings in Jordan and Saudi Arabia as the oldest known scaled building plans in human history. Although human constructions have modified natural spaces for millennia, few plans or maps predate the period of the literate civilizations of Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 16.05.2023
Jaw shapes of 90 shark species show: Evolution driven by habitat
Jaw shapes of 90 shark species show: Evolution driven by habitat
Analysis using X-ray computed tomography and 3D reconstructions An international research team led by Faviel A. López-Romero of the University of Vienna investigated how the jaw shape of sharks has changed over the course of evolution.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 15.05.2023
South Africa’s desert-like interior may have been more inviting to our human ancestors
Study expands range of livable regions in interior South Africa nearly 200,000 years ago Study: Paleolakes and socioecological implications of glacial "greening” of the South African interior (available upon request) Lining the Cape of South Africa and its southern coast are long chains of caves that nearly 200,000 years ago were surrounded by a lush landscape and plentiful food.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 09.05.2023
Preceding the work: the search for a common language
Preceding the work: the search for a common language
Presentation of two research projects from the humanities and social sciences It is an unwritten law: scientific exchanges and interdisciplinarity are the basis for excellent research. How does interdisciplinary collaboration increase the gain in knowledge? What obstacles have to be overcome in everyday work? We take a closer look at these and other questions by presenting two research projects from the Humanities and the Social Sciences.