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Health - History / Archeology - 28.09.2023
Learning critical Black history can change white perspectives on racism in health care
Health + Behavior UCLA study shows it can also spur support for policies aimed at equity Elizabeth Kivowitz September 28, 2023 Key takeaways Two-thirds of white Americans believe that Black Americans do not experience racism or racial inequities in health care. UCLA psychologists exposed white study participants to the well-documented history of medical-related mistreatment of Black Americans.

History / Archeology - 27.09.2023
New Rooms Discovered in Sahura's Pyramid
New Rooms Discovered in Sahura’s Pyramid
A remarkable archaeological breakthrough has been made with the excavation and restoration of rooms in the pyramid of Sahura. The discovered chambers are probably storage rooms intended to hold the royal burial objects. An Egyptian-German mission led by Egyptologist Dr. Mohamed Ismail Khaled of the Department of Egyptology at Julius-Maximilians-Universität of Würzburg (JMU) has made a significant discovery within Sahura's Pyramid.

History / Archeology - 21.09.2023
New Indo-European Language Discovered
New Indo-European Language Discovered
An excavation in Turkey has brought to light an unknown Indo-European language. Professor Daniel Schwemer, an expert for the ancient near east from Würzburg, is involved in investigating the discovery.

History / Archeology - Environment - 06.09.2023
Complete Neolithic cursus on the Isle of Arran
Complete Neolithic cursus on the Isle of Arran
Researchers discover complete Neolithic cursus on the Isle of Arran A leading team of researchers have discovered what is believed to be a complete Neolithic cursus set within a rich prehistoric landscape on the Isle of Arran, Scotland. A leading team of researchers have discovered what is believed to be a complete Neolithic cursus set within a rich prehistoric landscape on the Isle of Arran, Scotland.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 25.08.2023
Hallstatt: 3,000-year-old intestinal parasites of miners analysed
Hallstatt: 3,000-year-old intestinal parasites of miners analysed
Researchers in Vienna have obtained the world's first gene sequences of the human roundworm from the Bronze Age, as well as the first gene sequences from prehistoric parasites in Austria. The analysis was conducted on human faeces from prehistoric miners in Hallstatt. The findings were published by a team from the Medical University Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences (OeAW) and the Natural History Museum Vienna in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.

Chemistry - History / Archeology - 23.08.2023
First X-ray fluorescence chemical analysis of Pompeii Casts confirms death by suffocation
First X-ray fluorescence chemical analysis of Pompeii Casts confirms death by suffocation
An international research team led by the University of Valencia, in which the University of Cambridge and the Italian Ministry of Culture participate, has analysed for the first time the bones of the Pompeii Casts (the skeletons of its inhabitants in a plaster mould) with an innovative technique, x-ray fluorescence analysis, and concludes that they died of suffocation, not burned or dehydrated as other theories defend.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 21.08.2023
Researchers extract ancient DNA from a 2,900-year-old clay brick, revealing a time capsule of plant life
University of Oxford researchers have contributed to the first successful extraction of ancient DNA from a 2,900 year-old clay brick. The analysis, published today in Nature Scientific Reports , provides a fascinating insight into the diversity of plant species cultivated at that time and place, and could open the way to similar studies on clay material from different sites and time periods.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 16.08.2023
Ötzi: dark skin, bald head, Anatolian ancestry
Ötzi: dark skin, bald head, Anatolian ancestry
Research team used advanced sequencing technology to analyze Ötzi's genome to obtain a more accurate picture of the Iceman's appearance and genetic origins Ötzi's genome was decoded for the first time more than ten years ago. This was also the first time the genome of a mummy had been sequenced. The results provided important insights into the genetic makeup of prehistoric Europeans.

Paleontology - History / Archeology - 04.08.2023
Database with 2,400 prehistoric sites
Database with 2,400 prehistoric sites
Human history in one click: For the first time, numerous sites relating to the early history of mankind from 3 million to 20,000 years ago can be accessed in a large-scale database. Scientists from the research center ROCEEH ("The Role of Culture in Early Expansions of Humans") have compiled information on 2,400 prehistoric sites and 24,000 assemblages from more than 100 ancient cultures.

History / Archeology - 02.08.2023
What did the Romans do for us? Aqueducts and the art of Roman water management
While 21  century water companies struggle to maintain clean, fresh supplies, new research today from an international team led by Oxford geoarchaeologist Dr Güel Sürmelihindi , reveals that, some 2,000 years ago, Roman water engineers were keeping up a regular programme of managing and maintaining the ancient water systems.

History / Archeology - Physics - 02.08.2023
Bronze Age Arrowhead from Mörigen was made from Meteorite
Bronze Age Arrowhead from Mörigen was made from Meteorite
Freiburg physicist provided evidence for interdisciplinary project by the Natural History Museum Bern In an interdisciplinary study by the Natural History Museum Bern, led by geologist Beda Hofmann , researchers have proven that a Bronze Age arrowhead found in Mörigen on Lake Biel, Switzerland, was definitely made of meteoritic iron.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 31.07.2023
The study of the prehistorical sambaqui community (eastern South America) shows their genetic diversity
The study of the prehistorical sambaqui community (eastern South America) shows their genetic diversity
An international research team lead by the University of Tübingen and the Brazilian University of São Paulo, with CIDEGENT researcher Domingo C. Salazar from the University of Valencia, compiled the largest genomic dataset from Brazil to demonstrate that sambaqui communities on the southern and southeastern coasts didn-t represent a genetically homogeneous population.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 31.07.2023
Family History at the Shell Mound
Family History at the Shell Mound
Researchers from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen and the Brazilian University of São Paulo, together with an international research team led by first author Dr. Tiago Ferraz, compiled the largest genomic dataset from Brazil to demonstrate that sambaqui communities on the southern and southeastern coasts did not represent a genetically homogeneous population.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 28.07.2023
New insights into the origin of the Indo-European languages
New insights into the origin of the Indo-European languages
An international team of linguists and geneticists led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig has achieved a significant breakthrough in our understanding of the origins of Indo-European, a family of languages spoken by nearly half of the world's population.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 27.07.2023
New insights into the origin of the Indo-European languages
New insights into the origin of the Indo-European languages
Linguistics and genetics combine to suggest a new hybrid hypothesis for the origin of the Indo-European languages An international team of linguists and geneticists led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig has achieved a significant breakthrough in our understanding of the origins of Indo-European, a family of languages spoken by nearly half of the world's population.

History / Archeology - 24.07.2023
New discoveries on the wreck of Antikythera
New discoveries on the wreck of Antikythera
A team of Swiss and Greek archaeologists recently completed the third season of excavations on the wreck of Antikythera. The wreck of Antikythera was recently brought into the spotlight by the film Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny. Far from the cinematic imagination, an international team of archaeologists, divers, engineers and physical and natural scientists is currently excavating the famous wreck.

Chemistry - History / Archeology - 12.07.2023
Secrets of Egyptian painters revealed by chemistry
Secrets of Egyptian painters revealed by chemistry
Contrary to prior assumptions, ancient Egyptian painters did at times push the boundaries of convention. Artistic creations supposed to be copies of canonical images were in fact often adapted and reworked during their execution. This discovery was made using new, portable chemical imaging tools that leave the artworks intact.

History / Archeology - Environment - 06.07.2023
Giant stone artefacts found on rare Ice Age site in Kent
Giant stone artefacts found on rare Ice Age site in Kent
Researchers at the UCL Institute of Archaeology have discovered some of the largest early prehistoric stone tools in Britain. The excavations, which took place in Kent and were commissioned in advance of development of the Maritime Academy School in Frindsbury, revealed prehistoric artefacts in deep Ice Age sediments preserved on a hillside above the Medway Valley.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 28.06.2023
A study led by the University confirms that vipers inhabited the Columbretes Islands 2,600 years ago
A study led by the University confirms that vipers inhabited the Columbretes Islands 2,600 years ago
An international team led by Postdoctoral Researcher Margarita Salas of the University of Valencia Rafael Marquina, has studied the fossil remains of small vertebrates recovered from the Illa Grossa, the largest island of the archipelago of Columbretes.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.06.2023
The old grind just got a little older
The old grind just got a little older
An Italian study involving UdeM researchers shows new evidence that humans and Neanderthals milled flour as long as 43,000 years ago, several thousand years before what was previously thought, making Long before the invention of agriculture, humans already knew how to process cereals and other wild plants into a flour suitable for food - and now there's new evidence they did so long before scientists was previously thought.