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Law - 12.10.2020
’Universal law of touch’ will enable new advances in Virtual Reality
Seismic waves, commonly associated with earthquakes, have been used by scientists to develop a universal scaling law for the sense of touch. A team, led by researchers at the University of Birmingham, used Rayleigh waves to create the first scaling law for touch sensitivity. The results are published in Science Advances .

Social Sciences - Law - 28.09.2020
Understanding What Holds Societies Together
Berlin University Alliance funds six groundbreaking projects in the Social Cohesion funding line of its Grand Challenge Initiatives No 170/2020 from Sep 28, 2020 Social cohesion is a global challenge. Understanding social transformations is a key to successful coexistence in a complex, heterogeneous world.

Social Sciences - Law - 18.09.2020
Survey explores impact of technology-facilitated abuse
A study is under way to investigate how ‘smart' devices may be helping to facilitate domestic abuse in Australia and the United Kingdom. A team from The University of Queensland , Queensland University of Technology and University College London is examining how domestic and sexual violence survivors are being impacted by Internet of Things (IoT) technology, which enables everyday devices to collect, send and receive data.

Law - Politics - 25.06.2020
Skewing the Vote
V oter ID laws are becoming more common and more strict, and the stakes for American democracy are high and growing higher by the year. New research from the University of California San Diego provides evidence that voter ID laws disproportionately reduce voter turnout in more racially diverse areas.

Law - Health - 14.06.2020
Racial discrimination ingrained in jury selection, law school report finds
By Andrew Cohen  An eye-opening report from Berkeley Law's Death Penalty Clinic finds that racial discrimination is a consistent aspect of jury selection in California. The exhaustive study investigates the history, legacy, and ongoing practice of excluding people of color-especially African Americans-from state juries through prosecutors' peremptory challenges.  Clinic students and faculty evaluated 683 California Courts of Appeal cases involving objections to these challenges, used by attorneys to excuse potential jurors without providing a reason why, from 2006 to 2018.

Health - Law - 07.04.2020
Covid-19: Scientists develop Bluetooth tracing system, with privacy at heart
A new Bluetooth contact tracing system for detecting Covid-19 proximity, has been developed by a team of scientists and data privacy experts, including from UCL. The DP-3T tracing system, which is presented openly for public scrutiny in a new White Paper , works at scale and has been developed to the highest privacy standards, ready to deploy into an app.

Law - Computer Science - 03.04.2020
What removing legal threat to research that exposes online discrimination means
What removing legal threat to research that exposes online discrimination means
FACULTY Q&A A federal court has cleared the way for academic researchers, computer scientists and journalists to continue work that investigates online company practices for racial, gender or other discrimination. The ruling means that those who research online companies no longer have to fear prosecution for the work they do to hold tech companies accountable for their practices, said Christian Sandvig , the H Marshall McLuhan Collegiate Professor of Digital Media, professor of information and director of the Center for Ethics, Society, and Computing at the University of Michigan.

Health - Law - 11.03.2020
Moving beyond
Moving beyond "defensive medicine"
Study shows removing liability concerns slightly increases C-section procedures during childbirth. Doctors face tough choices during difficult childbirths - often involving the decision of whether to perform a cesarian section operation. And in the background lies a question: To what extent are these medical decisions motivated by the desire to avoid liability lawsuits?

Law - 05.02.2020
Burdensome regulations stymie backyard cottage production, UC Berkeley study finds
Building new backyard cottages - called accessory dwelling units - is a critical part of fixing California's housing crisis, says Karen Chapple, chair of UC Berkeley's city and regional planning program. (Photo courtesy of UC Berkeley.) Despite numerous California state legislative wins in support of Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) in the last three years, local regulations still limit their production, UC Berkeley researchers have found.

Law - Administration - 13.01.2020
The value of occupational licensing dims in the online world
SIEPR Faculty Fellow Brad Larsen brings a twist to ongoing debates over licensing laws as his latest research shows how consumers don't care about occupational licenses amid online reviews and star ratings. Consider the last time you hired an electrician, plumber or painter. Did you care to check if they were licensed or not? If licensing status was not your priority, you are not alone, according to new research by Stanford economist Brad Larsen.

Economics / Business - Law - 18.12.2019
Experts: 2020 to bring new data privacy, content protections
Two Carnegie Mellon University professors expect 2020 could bring new regulations and laws to protect consumers from data privacy risks and block pirate sites. In the coming year, Ari Lightman , professor of digital media and marketing at Carnegie Mellon's Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy , predicts that lawmakers will tighten regulations on social media networks as part of a push for more transparency from digital giants.

Law - Philosophy - 05.11.2019
Lawyers asked to advise on unethical issues
Nearly half (45%) of in-house lawyers have been asked to advise on an action with debatable ethics, according to research by UCL. The research, published in a new report ' Which way is the wind blowing? Understanding the moral compass of in-house legal counsel' also found that 39% of in-house lawyers had been asked to advise on something which was potentially illegal.

Social Sciences - Law - 10.10.2019
Update ‘nearest relative’ criteria under Mental Health Act to increase patient choice
The system in place under the Mental Health Act that places decision-making powers in the hands of the nearest relatives for people who are sectioned needs to be extended to others to improve patient choice, according to new research. The study, from academics at the universities of Bath, Bristol and the University of the West of England published in the journal Health & Social Care in the Community , identifies challenges to the existing system and makes recommendations for policy-makers and practitioners.

Law - 10.10.2019
Scottish Jury Research report published
Findings from the UK's largest mock jury research project to-date have been released. Commissioned by the Scottish Government, the research was led by Ipsos MORI Scotland, with the collaboration of School of Law academics Professor Fiona Leverick and Professor James Chalmers and the University of Warwick's Professor Vanessa Munro.

Law - 01.10.2019
Why our extreme porn laws need to change
A law against possession of rape pornography, introduced in 2015, is very rarely used with few charges and prosecutions. This is what our researchers have found after analysing data obtained through a Freedom of Information request. Police focus The research shows that during 2015-2017 the vast majority (85 per cent) of extreme pornography charges were for possessing bestiality porn with only one per cent of charges for rape pornography.

Law - 27.09.2019
Stanford releases 2019 Safety, Security & Fire Report
The 116-page report, which promotes personal safety and crime prevention on campus, also provides crime statistics required under federal law. It is available online and in print. Stanford has released its 2019 Safety, Security & Fire Report , an annual publication that promotes personal safety and crime prevention on campus, and provides statistics about specified crimes that were reported during the 2018 calendar year.

Law - Innovation - 19.09.2019
Opinion: Why forensic science is in crisis and how we can fix it
Professor Ruth Morgan (UCL Security and Crime Science) writes about the misinterpretation of forensic evidence and the issues that this causes for the criminal justice system. Imagine you're in court, accused of a crime that you know you didn't commit. Now imagine a scientist takes the stand and starts explaining to the court how your DNA is on the murder weapon.

Law - 26.07.2019
Muslim LGBTQI+ refugees more likely to gain asylum in Germany if they conform to stereotypes
LGBTQI+ Muslims seeking asylum are more successful if they speak, dress and act in accordance with Western notions of homosexuality, according to a new study from the University of Bristol.

Law - 26.07.2019
Banning tobacco sales to people under age 21 reduces smoking
Countyand municipality-level bans on tobacco sales to individuals under age 21 yield substantive reductions in smoking among 18- to 20-year-olds, according to a new study from the Yale School of Public Health. Published online in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, the study examines how  "tobacco-21 laws" affect smoking among 18- to 20-year-olds residing in metropolitan/micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs), which are clusters of adjacent counties that include an urban center with at least 10,000 residents.

Law - 26.07.2019
Consorting with criminals: a legitimate offence?
A University of Sydney Law School researcher has argued that consorting laws reveal a new character of criminal responsibility in a research paper. In Australia, the crime of consorting differs slightly from state to state but the key element is the same. Knowingly associating with criminals (or being 'recklessly unaware of their identities') is still considered an offence.
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