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Social Sciences - Law - 10.10.2019
Update ‘nearest relative’ criteria under Mental Health Act to increase patient choice
The system in place under the Mental Health Act that places decision-making powers in the hands of the nearest relatives for people who are sectioned needs to be extended to others to improve patient choice, according to new research. The study, from academics at the universities of Bath, Bristol and the University of the West of England published in the journal Health & Social Care in the Community , identifies challenges to the existing system and makes recommendations for policy-makers and practitioners.

Law - 10.10.2019
Scottish Jury Research report published
Findings from the UK's largest mock jury research project to-date have been released. Commissioned by the Scottish Government, the research was led by Ipsos MORI Scotland, with the collaboration of School of Law academics Professor Fiona Leverick and Professor James Chalmers and the University of Warwick's Professor Vanessa Munro.

Law - 01.10.2019
Why our extreme porn laws need to change
A law against possession of rape pornography, introduced in 2015, is very rarely used with few charges and prosecutions. This is what our researchers have found after analysing data obtained through a Freedom of Information request. Police focus The research shows that during 2015-2017 the vast majority (85 per cent) of extreme pornography charges were for possessing bestiality porn with only one per cent of charges for rape pornography.

Law - 27.09.2019
Stanford releases 2019 Safety, Security & Fire Report
The 116-page report, which promotes personal safety and crime prevention on campus, also provides crime statistics required under federal law. It is available online and in print. Stanford has released its 2019 Safety, Security & Fire Report , an annual publication that promotes personal safety and crime prevention on campus, and provides statistics about specified crimes that were reported during the 2018 calendar year.

Law - Innovation / Technology - 19.09.2019
Opinion: Why forensic science is in crisis and how we can fix it
Professor Ruth Morgan (UCL Security and Crime Science) writes about the misinterpretation of forensic evidence and the issues that this causes for the criminal justice system. Imagine you're in court, accused of a crime that you know you didn't commit. Now imagine a scientist takes the stand and starts explaining to the court how your DNA is on the murder weapon.

Law - 26.07.2019
Muslim LGBTQI+ refugees more likely to gain asylum in Germany if they conform to stereotypes
LGBTQI+ Muslims seeking asylum are more successful if they speak, dress and act in accordance with Western notions of homosexuality, according to a new study from the University of Bristol.

Law - 26.07.2019
Banning tobacco sales to people under age 21 reduces smoking
Countyand municipality-level bans on tobacco sales to individuals under age 21 yield substantive reductions in smoking among 18- to 20-year-olds, according to a new study from the Yale School of Public Health. Published online in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, the study examines how  "tobacco-21 laws" affect smoking among 18- to 20-year-olds residing in metropolitan/micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs), which are clusters of adjacent counties that include an urban center with at least 10,000 residents.

Law - 26.07.2019
Consorting with criminals: a legitimate offence?
A University of Sydney Law School researcher has argued that consorting laws reveal a new character of criminal responsibility in a research paper. In Australia, the crime of consorting differs slightly from state to state but the key element is the same. Knowingly associating with criminals (or being 'recklessly unaware of their identities') is still considered an offence.

Law - 29.04.2019
Could a lack of confidence in design law reduce innovation in the UK?
UK designers are less likely to seek legal action if someone copies their work compared with the rest of Europe, according to new research. Experts at the University of Nottingham tested the effectiveness of design case law in the 28 member states of the EU. Among the big countries in the EU, the UK had some of the lowest numbers of cases brought to court per population, often with less favourable outcomes for designers.

Business / Economics - Law - 12.04.2019
Knife crime: assault data can help forecast fatal stabbings
Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Knife crime data from a 12-month period could be used to help forecast the London neighbourhoods most likely to suffer a fatal stabbing the following year, according to latest research.

Religions - Law - 01.04.2019
Vast majority of NSW hate crimes race and religion related: study
A new University of Sydney study provides the most comprehensive picture of the patterns of hate crime in Australia to date. It has revealed the prevalence of race and religion-based hate crimes, and that people of Asian, Indian/Pakistani and Muslim backgrounds are the most frequent victims. Hate crime - also referred to as 'bias crime' - is crime that is motivated by prejudice, bias or hatred towards a presumed characteristic of the victim, such as race, religion, sexual orientation, disability status or gender identity.

Environment - Law - 20.03.2019
New tool merges climate science, law and policy to protect California coastline
A Stanford study released on March 13 in Marine Policy provides a new framework for coastal climate adaptation planning, with the potential to save local California governments money and protect the homes and livelihoods of coastal residents. The research incorporates a statewide assessment of the California coast's zoning, habitat, land use, and legal requirements into an interactive tool managers can use to identify which strategies best address threats along the coastline.

Law - 12.12.2018
Reduction in the legal blood alcohol limit has had no impact on number of road traffic accidents
The lowering of the legal blood alcohol limit for drivers in Scotland has had no impact on the number of road traffic accidents, a new study has found. The research, led by the University of Glasgow and published in The Lancet, evaluated the impact of the change in legislation which occurred in Scotland in December 2014, when the blood alcohol concentration limit for drivers was reduced from 80 mg/dL to 50 mg/dL.

Law - 21.11.2018
NOAA listening session to focus on weather research, forecasting improvements
Neil Jacobs, assistant secretary of commerce for environmental observation and prediction at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), will be in Madison on Monday, Nov. 26, to gather public input on the Department of Commerce's 2018-2022 strategic plan and the Weather Research and Forecasting and Innovation Act of 2017.

Physics - Law - 07.11.2018
Levitating particles could lift nuclear detective work
Levitating particles could lift nuclear detective work
Laser-based 'optical tweezers' could levitate uranium and plutonium particles, thus allowing the measurement of nuclear recoil during radioactive decay. Los Alamos scientists Alexander Malyzhenkov and Alonso Castro demonstrate levitating uranium particles with laser beams. Our idea relies on trapping a particle using 'optical tweezers,' a technique which is the subject of this year's Nobel prize in Physics.

Law - 22.10.2018
New researchers Law and Development
Inleiding: Leonardo Villafuerte and Alberto Pecoraro both started their PhD at the Law and Development Research Group. The Law and Development Research Group welcomes two new researchers starting up their PhD. Leonardo D. Villafuerte Philippsborn is a full-time lecturer at the Universidad Católica Boliviana "San Pablo" (UCB), and he is editor of its peer-reviewed law journal (UCB Law Review).

Law - 01.10.2018
Couples in South Asia struggle to gain economic independence from in-laws
Intergenerational power relations may be just as important as male-female power relations for women's economic empowerment, according to new UCL research. The study, published in  World Development , was conducted in rural Nepal where mothers-in-law and daughters-in-law often have fraught relationships, as their survival and well-being depend on gaining favour with male family members.

Law - 21.09.2018
University of Birmingham signs joint initiative to develop HydroFlex - the UK’s first hydrogen train
A change in culture within the NHS is needed to ensure that managers are less resistant to hearing, and acting upon, bad news, research led by the University of Birmingham has found. Research led by the University's Health Services Management Centre found that any future whistleblowing policies must deal with the ‘deaf effect' amongst NHS managers, where entrenched status and power differences between different professional and occupational groups can limit open reporting cultures.

Law - Politics - 23.08.2018
More work needed to make Irish abortion law fit-for-purpose
While Government-imposed restrictions on immigration can reduce overall migration, they can also be ineffective or even counterproductive, pushing more would-be migrants into unauthorised channels, finds new research carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. The study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, investigated how individuals are likely to move from one country to another based on varying levels of restriction.

Politics - Law - 07.08.2018
Visa restrictions can lead to increase in illegal migration
While Government-imposed restrictions on immigration can reduce overall migration, they can also be ineffective or even counterproductive, pushing more would-be migrants into unauthorised channels, finds new UCL-led research in collaboration with Royal Holloway and University of Birmingham. The study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , investigated how individuals are likely to move from one country to another based on varying levels of restriction.
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