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Civil Engineering - Law - 06.03.2017
Sharing the fares
Sharing the fares
A newly published study co-authored by MIT researchers suggests that urban ride-sharing is feasible in a wide variety of cities around the globe - and indeed that the potential 'shareability' of autos in those places is more similar, from place to place, than previously expected. The work builds on a 2014 study showing that ride-sharing - in the form of, say, taxi trips shared with other passengers traveling along similar routes - could be highly effective in New York City.

Law - 15.02.2017
Wetting Effect on Torricelli's Law
Wetting Effect on Torricelli’s Law
Jets at the exit of the tank for similar conditions except wetting; hole radius = 1.75 mm; initial height = 10 cm. From hydrophilic to hydrophobic plate: (a) Glass, (b) Plexiglas, (c) Hydrophobic-glass. Left side: Zoom in of the jets at the hole exit to display the meniscus profiles for the different wetting conditions (i.e.

Law - 06.01.2017
Brixton Road becomes first place in London to breach Nitrogen dioxide limits
Data from King's College London's Environmental Research Group has shown Brixton Road has become the first place in London to breach objectives for nitrogen dioxide for 2017. UK objectives and EU limits stipulate a maximum nitrogen dioxide concentration that must not to be exceeded for more than 18 hours over the whole year.

Politics - Law - 14.12.2016
Thomas Muir - new evidence unearthed
New Court of Session papers, missing for more than 200 years, have been unearthed by the Faculty of Advocates and Professor Gerard Carruthers, University of Glasgow. The newly found papers shine light on Thomas Muir and how he courted controversy in his early years, which may have contributed to his treatment by the justice system in later life.

Law - Health - 02.12.2016
What are the health effects of legalizing marijuana?
Robert MacCoun , a professor of law and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, relays the potential risks and benefits of legalizing marijuana. His research focuses on drug policy, and he has written extensively about the effects of marijuana from a legal and health perspective.

Law - Health - 15.11.2016
Florida’s homicide rates rise after ’Stand Your Ground’ self-defence law
A change in self-defence laws in Florida which gave citizens the right to use lethal force to protect themselves in public has been linked with the state's homicide rates going up by nearly a quarter. The study published in  JAMA Internal Medicine,  led by the University of Oxford with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the University of Pennsylvania, looked at homicide rates before and after the enactment of State Bill 436, known as the Stand Your Ground law, which was signed by Governor Jeb Bush in 2005.

Economics / Business - Law - 07.11.2016
Online gambling regulations should be tightened to protect children and young people, research finds
Online gambling regulations should be tightened to protect children and young people, research finds
Children and adolescents are being targeted by online gambling websites due to flaws in advertising legislation, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London and City University London. The researchers point to recent statistics from an international research review which suggest that 77 to 83 per cent of adolescents are involved in some kind of gambling, and 10 to 15 per cent of adolescents are at risk of developing serious gambling problems.

Law - Computer Science - 24.10.2016
AI predicts outcomes of human rights trials
AI predicts outcomes of human rights trials
The judicial decisions of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) have been predicted to 79% accuracy using an artificial intelligence (AI) method developed by researchers at UCL, the University of Sheffield and the University of Pennsylvania. The method is the first to predict the outcomes of a major international court by automatically analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm.

Psychology - Law - 17.10.2016
Why was Donald Trump sniffling?
Why was Donald Trump sniffling?
In the first US presidential debate there were many who noticed Donald Trump's sniffling. It created a twitter storm under the hashtag #TrumpSniffles and the media became extremely interested in the presidential candidate's health. However, Lisa Flower, a doctoral student in Sociology at Lund University, Sweden, who is currently doing research on emotions, offers an alternative explanation: 'My research shows that sniffling can be a way for a speaker to indicate a shift from personal to professional opinions and vice versa.

Law - 17.10.2016
INRA commits further to open science
INRA commits further to open science
INRA has just published its official policy guidelines regarding open access to its publications and data.

Life Sciences - Law - 03.10.2016
First evidence of deep-sea animals ingesting microplastics
Following the news that the UK government is to ban plastic microbeads by the end of 2017, a team of scientists led by the University of Oxford has discovered the first evidence of microplastics being ingested by deep-sea animals. Researchers working on the Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Cook at two sites in the mid-Atlantic and south-west Indian Ocean found plastic microfibres inside creatures including hermit crabs, squat lobsters and sea cucumbers at depths of between 300m and 1800m.

Life Sciences - Law - 29.09.2016
Vice-Chancellor’s Oration 2016
Following the news that the UK government is to ban plastic microbeads by the end of 2017, a team of scientists led by the University of Oxford has discovered the first evidence of microplastics being ingested by deep-sea animals. Researchers working on the Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Cook at two sites in the mid-Atlantic and south-west Indian Ocean found plastic microfibres inside creatures including hermit crabs, squat lobsters and sea cucumbers at depths of between 300m and 1800m.

Law - Life Sciences - 21.09.2016
Q&A with Jennifer Mnookin: Raising the bar for scientific evidence in court
Q&A with Jennifer Mnookin: Raising the bar for scientific evidence in court
This week, the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) challenged the scientific community and the justice system to dramatically improve the reliability of scientific evidence and testimony presented in criminal courts. In the report, council members unanimously called for widespread changes to the protocols for using scientific evidence.

Law - Computer Science - 26.08.2016
Lobbyists’ model legislation unmasked by U-M researchers
ANN ARBOR'Since 2005, about two dozen states have created "Stand Your Ground" laws authorizing deadly force in self-defense. And nearly all of those laws have similar language. So, how did that happen? They all shared an author: The American Legislative Exchange Council drafted "model" legislation and lobbied states to pass it.

Physics - Law - 18.08.2016
UCLA physicists discover apparent departure from the laws of thermodynamics?
Ions subjected to buffer gas cooling never truly reach the same temperature as the surrounding gas Stuart Wolpert Eric Hudson and Steven Schowalter/UCLA Physics A microscopic sample of barium ions, shown in teal, immersed in a cloud of calcium atoms whose temperature is 1/1,000th of a degree above absolute zero.

Law - Mechanical Engineering - 21.07.2016
Leonardo da Vinci’s irrelevant? scribbles mark the spot where he first recorded the laws of friction
A new detailed study of notes and sketches by Leonardo da Vinci has identified a page of scribbles in a tiny notebook as the place where Leonardo first recorded the laws of friction. The research also shows that he went on to apply this knowledge repeatedly to mechanical problems for more than 20 years.

Law - Health - 23.06.2016
State laws aimed at curbing prescription opioid abuse have had little impact
Researchers from UCLA Law and Dartmouth analyze effect of laws on opioid use by disabled Medicare beneficiaries UCLA Newsroom A new study by researchers from UCLA School of Law and the Dartmouth Institute of Health Policy and Clinical Practice found that state laws aimed at curbing prescription opioid abuse have had no measurable effect on opioid use by a vulnerable population with high rates of use.

Administration - Law - 15.06.2016
Racial disparities in Oakland, Calif., police behavior, offers solutions
Stanford researchers analyzing thousands of data points found racial disparities in how Oakland Police Department officers treated African Americans on routine traffic and pedestrian stops. The researchers suggest 50 measures to improve police-community relations, such as better data collection, bias training and changes in cultures and systems.

Law - 08.06.2016
More People Need to Understand Their Rights
The right to remain silent while being questioned by police is something that all of us think we understand fairly well. We all have seen the police warn suspects of this right, known as the "Miranda warning," in countless movies and TV shows. Yet, as we commemorate the 50th anniversary of this right this month, there is much still to be learned.

Law - 12.05.2016
Layout change can make licensing agreements more agreeable
Participants who reviewed the paraphrased agreement had a better attitude about the contract, which the researchers refer to as a halo effect. According to Waddell, the halo effect is a tendency for people to make broad but unrelated judgments based on a specific detail or attribute. SAN JOSE, Calif.