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Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.06.2010
Scientists make water-free liquid from blood protein
Scientists make water-free liquid from blood protein
Scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered a way to make a highly concentrated water-free liquid of a key blood protein, myoglobin, opening up the possibility of new types of biomedical materials. By using a chemical procedure in which surfactant molecules, a form of wetting agent, are attached to the protein surface, the researchers remove the water by freeze-drying at low temperature to produce a solid powder.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.06.2010
Scientists make water-free liquid from blood protein
Scientists make water-free liquid from blood protein
Scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered a way to make a highly concentrated water-free liquid of a key blood protein, myoglobin, opening up the possibility of new types of biomedical materials. By using a chemical procedure in which surfactant molecules, a form of wetting agent, are attached to the protein surface, the researchers remove the water by freeze-drying at low temperature to produce a solid powder.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.06.2010
Autism finding could lead to simple urine test for the condition
Autism finding could lead to simple urine test for the condition
Study suggests that children with autism have a different chemical fingerprint in their urine - News Release For immediate release Thursday 3 June 2010 Children with autism have a different chemical fingerprint in their urine than non-autistic children, according to new research published tomorrow in the print edition of the Journal of Proteome Research .

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 02.06.2010
Pheromone responsible for male mouse 'sex appeal'
Pheromone responsible for male mouse ’sex appeal’
Liverpool, UK - 3 June 2010: Scientists at the University of Liverpool have identified a protein pheromone in mouse urine that is responsible for female attraction to particular male mice. The researchers have named the pheromone ‘darcin', after Jane Austen's hero in Pride and Prejudice, Mr Darcy.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.06.2010
Caltech Biologists Provide Molecular Explanation for the Evolution of Tamiflu Resistance
PASADENA, Calif.—Biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have pinpointed molecular changes that helped allow the global spread of resistance to the antiviral medication Tamiflu (oseltamivir) among strains of the seasonal H1N1 flu virus. The study—led by David Baltimore, Caltech's Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology and recipient of the 1975 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, and postdoctoral scholar Jesse D. Bloom—appears in the June 4 issue of the journal Science .

Health - Life Sciences - 02.06.2010
Too many weight in pregnancy may lead to future heart risks
Too many weight in pregnancy may lead to future heart risks
The new research from the University of Bristol's Children of the 90s project, shows that women who put on more weight during pregnancy than recommended by the 2009 Institute of Medicine's guidelines had children who at the age of nine: Antenatal records were used to collect detailed information about mothers? weight gain during pregnancy.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.06.2010
Meditation reduces the emotional impact of pain
Scientists from The University of Manchester recruited individuals into the study who had a diverse range of experience with meditation, spanning anything from months to decades. It was only the more advanced meditators whose anticipation and experience of pain differed from non-meditators.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.06.2010
Gaining too much weight in pregnancy may lead to future heart risks
Gaining too much weight in pregnancy may lead to future heart risks
The new research from the University of Bristol's Children of the 90s project, shows that women who put on more weight during pregnancy than recommended by the 2009 Institute of Medicine's guidelines had children who at the age of nine: Antenatal records were used to collect detailed information about mothers? weight gain during pregnancy.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.06.2010
Lifestyle doesn t affect genetic risk of breast cancer
Lifestyle doesn t affect genetic risk of breast cancer
The increased risk of breast cancer associated with a range of common genes is not affected by lifestyle factors - including use of hormone replacement therapy, age at birth of first child, obesity, and alcohol consumption - an Oxford-led study has found. Recent studies have identified several genetic variations found commonly among the population that carry a small but increased risk of breast cancer.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 02.06.2010
Survey Shows Poorly Designed Wastewater Treatment Plants May Emit More Nitrous Oxide
The first large-scale survey of 12 wastewater plants across the U.S., led by Columbia scientists, shows that the magnitude of N2O emissions from these wastewater treatment plants may be more variable and complex than previously thought. It also challenges the current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) approach for assessing N2O emissions from such plants.

Environment - Life Sciences - 31.05.2010
New gecko species identified in West African rain forests
New gecko species identified in West African rain forests
BERKELEY — The West African forest gecko, a secretive but widely distributed species in forest patches from Ghana to Congo, is actually four distinct species that appear to have evolved over the past 100,000 years due to the fragmentation of a belt of tropical rain forest, according to a report in this week's issue of the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B .

Life Sciences - Health - 31.05.2010
Breakthrough in stem cell culturing
Breakthrough in stem cell culturing
For the first time, human embryonic stem cells have been cultured under chemically controlled conditions without the use of animal substances, which is essential for future clinical uses. The method has been developed by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and is presented . Embryonic stem cells can be turned into any other type of cell in the body and have potential uses in treatments where sick cells need to be replaced.

Life Sciences - 26.05.2010
Swarming locusts need larger brains
Swarming locusts need larger brains
One of the most devastating events in the insect world - the locust swarm - has extraordinary effects on the insect's brains, scientists in Cambridge have discovered. Although desert locusts are infamous for their swarming behaviour - when they migrate en masse and consume everything in their path - they usually occur in a solitary form, living alone and actively avoiding fellow locusts.

Physics - Life Sciences - 21.05.2010
Royal Society announces new Fellows
Royal Society announces new Fellows
Eight Cambridge researchers are among the 44 new Fellows announced by the Royal Society this week. Sir Paul Nurse, President of the Royal Society said: "It is a true pleasure to welcome this year's new Fellows to the Royal Society. They join the ranks of the UK and Commonwealth's leading scientists, counting themselves among early Fellows such as Isaac Newton, Robert Boyle and Charles Darwin.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.05.2010
Scientists find important new step in protein production
Scientists at the University of Manchester have identified an extra step in protein production, a major activity of all cells, which they believe impacts particularly on how our cells respond to stresses such as starvation and virus attack. Drs Graham Pavitt and Martin Jennings, whose findings are published in Nature today (20 May 2010), have found a new function for a protein, called eIF5, which is critical for appropriate and normal control of the protein production process.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.05.2010
Preventing cells from getting the kinks out of DNA
BERKELEY — Many standard antibiotics and anti-cancer drugs block the enzymes that snip the kinks and knots out of DNA — DNA tangles are lethal to cells — but the drugs are increasingly encountering resistant bacteria and tumors. A new discovery by University of California, Berkeley, biochemists could pave the way for new research into how to re-design these drugs to make them more effective poisons for cancer cells and harmful bacteria.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 20.05.2010
Scientists discover the molecular heart of collective behavior
Scientists discover the molecular heart of collective behavior
Scientists have long wondered what is happening at the cellular and molecular level to bring about this amazing coordination of so many individual animals, insects and organisms into groups. It's a choreography seen throughout nature from the large-scale to the miniscule, with synchronized movements as precise as the dance lineup of a Broadway musical.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.05.2010
Genetic link to infectious disease susceptibility found
Genetic link to infectious disease susceptibility found
Genetic variants that increase susceptibility to several infectious diseases - including tuberculosis and malaria - have been identified by researchers from Oxford and Singapore. The variations in DNA sequence identified by the scientists occur within a single gene involved in the body's immune response to infectious disease.

Environment - Life Sciences - 19.05.2010
Study finds female damselflies prefer `hot´ males
Study finds female damselflies prefer `hot´ males
Researchers from the University of Sheffield have found that female damselflies prefer hot males. The study, which was published in the journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, found that hot male damselflies, who have warmed their bodies in the sun, are more attractive to their female counterparts.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.05.2010
Extending lifespan has mixed effects on learning and memory
Extending lifespan has mixed effects on learning and memory
Decreasing the intake of calories and tweaking the activity of the hormone insulin are two methods long known to increase lifespan in a wide range of organisms. In particular, studies have shown that longevity can be extended by reducing activity in the insulin-signaling pathway - a chain of events through which insulin influences numerous biological processes, including metabolism, stress response and development.