« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 21 - 40 of 10291.


Life Sciences - Environment - 14.05.2019
Fascinating microorganisms in perialpine lakes
Fascinating microorganisms in perialpine lakes
The lakes in the perialpine regions of Europe are home to a particular community of cyanobacteria which Marie-Eve Monchamp investigated in connection with her doctoral thesis at Eawag. "We collected sediment cores from ten lakes in Switzerland, Italy and France, and analysed the cyanobacterial DNA extracted from these cores", she explains.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
Symbionts as lifesavers
Symbionts as lifesavers
Researchers discover new factor influencing the spread of Legionella When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. But where do these pathogens come from and how do they thrive in the environment before the infection occurs' An international team led by Matthias Horn from the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science at the University of Vienna has tackled this question using an important bacterial pathogen that causes lung disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
It’s in the Weeds: Herbicide Linked to Human Liver Disease
Exposure to glyphosate, the primary ingredient in the popular weed killer Roundup, correlates to more severe cases of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Glyphosate, the primary ingredient in Monsanto's popular weed killer Roundup, has been linked to liver disease in animal models. In a new study, the first of its kind, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine report an association between the herbicide and negative effects upon the human liver.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.05.2019
Second grant to bring research to market
05/14/2019 Getting an accurate picture of the real-time transcriptional activity of a cell: This is the goal of a new research project at the University of Würzburg which is funded by the European Research Council. If you paid attention during biology lessons, you may remember that genetic information in human cells is contained in the cell nucleus as a DNA double helix.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.05.2019
Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef
Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef
Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, University of Queensland researchers believe. Bleaching occurs when the symbiotic relationship between coral and algae breaks down - corals under environmental stress disconnect from their algae partners, which means they lose their energy source.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.05.2019
Extreme cold could reveal herpesvirus infection dynamics
Extreme cold could reveal herpesvirus infection dynamics
Researchers don't know much about how viruses like those that cause chicken pox infect cells. A super-cold form of electron microscopy could change that, potentially paving the way for new treatments and vaccines. The funny thing about the virus that causes chicken pox is that no one knows for sure how it or many of its herpesvirus cousins invade and infect cells.

Life Sciences - Environment - 13.05.2019
Discovery unleashes growth in salty soils
Discovery unleashes growth in salty soils
A hormone produced by stressed plants could combat damage caused by salty soils, considerably increasing plant growth. A team of researchers from The University of Queensland and Western Sydney University has identified a naturally-occurring chemical in plants - known as 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, or ACC - that reduces the symptoms of salt stress when applied to soil.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.05.2019
Remarkable fish see colour in deep, dark water
Remarkable fish see colour in deep, dark water
Fish living up to 1500 metres below the surface have developed surprisingly diverse vision that could help them determine predator from prey in the dimly-lit depths of their fish-eats-fish world. An international research team involving University of Queensland scientists believes the deep-sea discovery that fish could see colour in the dark shines new light on the evolution of vision in vertebrates, including humans.

Life Sciences - 10.05.2019
Dietary fats entering the brain may explain link between obesity and depression
Obesity and depression have long been linked, with previous clinical studies finding an association between these two conditions. However, until now, the mechanisms of how obesity affects depression and vice versa have not been fully understood. Now, in a new study led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Gladstone Institutes, and published today in Translational Psychiatry , scientists have been able to demonstrate the links between the consumption of diets high in saturated fats that lead to obesity and the development of depression phenotypes.

Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
Back to the sources of neural diversity
Back to the sources of neural diversity
By deciphering the genetic programmes of neurons of the cerebral cortex, Swiss and Belgian researchers unravel the mechanisms controlling the genesis of cells in one of the most essential parts of our brain. The cortex is a complex brain region that allows us to perceive the world and interact with objects and beings around us.

Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
New type of highly sensitive vision discovered in deep-sea fish
New type of highly sensitive vision discovered in deep-sea fish
The deep sea is home to fish species that can detect various wavelengths of light in near-total darkness. Unlike other vertebrates, they have several genes for the light-sensitive photopigment rhodopsin, which likely enables these fish to detect bioluminescent signals from light-emitting organs. The findings were published by an international team of researchers led by evolutionary biologists from the University of Basel.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
Cancer cells can communicate over longer distances within the body
Cancer cells can communicate over longer distances within the body
EPFL researchers have discovered that cancer cells use exosomes to communicate with each other and send information through the bloodstream. This breakthrough opens up new possibilities for the use of cancer immunotherapy techniques. "It was a huge surprise, we didn't expect to find so many melanoma cancer cell markers in blood exosomes," explains Hubert Girault, who heads up the Laboratory of Physical and Analytical Electrochemistry at EPFL Valais Wallis.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.05.2019
Stem cell scientists clear another hurdle in creating transplant arteries
Jue Zhang, lead author on the paper published in Stem Cell Reports, discusses cell images with Matt Brown, a coauthor on the paper and former postdoctoral researcher at the Morgridge Institute. Morgridge Institute for Research Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death worldwide, and treating it isn't easy.  The disease wreaks havoc on patients' blood vessels and can require complex bypass surgery.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 09.05.2019
New professor brings precision data to the dairy barn
Joao Dorea, faculty member in the UW-Madison Department of Dairy Science, explains to colleague Victor Cabrera results he observed using an automated computer vision system that was developed to monitor the behavior of dairy calves. Photo by Ted Halbach/UW-Madison Department of Dairy Science The same technology that alerts a self-driving car that there's a pedestrian in the crosswalk could also warn a dairy farmer that a calf is getting sick-even if that calf is mingled among dozens of healthy ones.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.05.2019
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study. Predicting a species' sensitivity to environmental changes, such as deforestation or climate change, is crucial for designing conservation strategies. These predictions are often based on a species' physical traits, and assume that all members of a species will respond the same.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 09.05.2019
Global Alliance of Biofoundries is major step forward in synthetic biology
Global Alliance of Biofoundries is major step forward in synthetic biology
A new network of the world's leading Biofoundries has been launched to drive forward synthetic biology research and industry. The Global Alliance of Biofoundries (GBA) brings together 16 institutions from countries including the UK, US, Japan, Singapore, China, Australia, Denmark and Canada. The London DNA Foundry , based at Imperial College London, is one of the leading founders of the new Global Alliance.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 08.05.2019
Researchers take a step towards light-based, brain-like computing chip
Researchers take a step towards light-based, brain-like computing chip
New light-based hardware which can store and process information in a similar way to the human brain / Study published in "Nature" journal A technology that functions like a brain? In these times of artificial intelligence, this no longer seems so far-fetched - for example, when a mobile phone can recognise faces or languages.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 08.05.2019
Knowledge for Growth 2019
5 Flemish universities reveal innovative state-of-the-art biotech research No less than 25 technologies in drug screening, therapy development, MedTech, digital health and AI will be showcased or pitched by the five Flemish universities at Europe's leading life sciences conference in Ghent.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.05.2019
Stress in early life could make people more likely to develop depression
New research by the University of Bristol has found that early life adversity could make an individual more at risk of developing negative thinking, which could lead to major depressive disorder (MDD). The findings provide biological and psychological evidence to support work first proposed in the 1960s.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.05.2019
’Bad guy’ fibrocytes could help rebuild damaged tissue
Could a blood cell type responsible for scarring and diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis be repurposed to help engineer healthy tissue? A new study by a University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health researcher shows that someday, fibrocytes may be used for regenerative therapies for people who need to have their vocal folds or other tissues rebuilt after damage or loss.