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Health - Life Sciences - 14.03.2019
Novel YSPH framework helps identify genes associated with disease
A powerful analytical tool, known as UTMOST, developed by Hongyu Zhao, Ph.D., the Ira V. Hiscock Professor of Biostatistics at the Yale School of Public Health, and colleagues could allow researchers to design therapeutic drugs that more effectively combat disease. Zhao explained the framework's purpose and potential in identifying genetic associations to disease in a recent interview.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2019
New approach to stroke treatment could minimize brain damage
A new treatment for a common type of stroke may soon be possible, thanks to a discovery by an international team of researchers. In a study published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine , researchers successfully used a new approach that significantly minimized brain damage caused by stroke in mouse models.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.03.2019
New cause for concern over weedkiller glyphosate
New research from McGill University reveals an overlooked impact that the widely used herbicide glyphosate may be having on the environment. First commercialized by Monsanto under the name Roundup, glyphosate has come under scrutiny in the past, mostly in relation to its potential toxicity. This new research, published recently in the Ecological Society of America's Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, focuses not on direct health risks associated with the herbicide, but on its contribution to environmental phosphorus levels, an issue that has yet to receive much attention.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2019
Uncovering Uncultivated Microbes in the Human Gut
Uncovering Uncultivated Microbes in the Human Gut
A tree's growth is dependent on nutrients from the soil and water, as well as the microbes in, on, and around the roots. Similarly, a human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body's interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. Genome sequences are critical for characterizing individual microbes and understanding their functional roles.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.03.2019
A new approach to drugging a difficult cancer target
A new approach to drugging a difficult cancer target
Study suggests an alternative way to treat tumors that are dependent on the cancer-promoting Myc protein. One of the most common cancer-promoting genes, known as Myc, is also one of the most difficult to target with drugs. Scientists have long tried to develop drugs that block the Myc protein, but so far their efforts have not been successful.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2019
Brain wave stimulation may improve Alzheimer's symptoms
Brain wave stimulation may improve Alzheimer’s symptoms
Noninvasive treatment improves memory and reduces amyloid plaques in mice. By exposing mice to a unique combination of light and sound, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients. This noninvasive treatment, which works by inducing brain waves known as gamma oscillations, also greatly reduced the number of amyloid plaques found in the brains of these mice.

Innovation / Technology - Life Sciences - 14.03.2019
Two EPFL spin-offs reach the finals of an international competition
Two EPFL spin-offs reach the finals of an international competition
EPFL spinoffs Lumendo and Gliapharm are among 80 deep-tech startups from around the world that have qualified for the finals of the Hello Tomorrow Challenge in Paris tomorrow. The finalists will pitch their company to a jury of technology specialists and investors. In addition to vying for cash prizes, the startups are gaining valuable visibility.

Life Sciences - 14.03.2019
Research leads to new discoveries about the Mary Rose
A Cardiff University archaeologist has revealed new insights into the origins of the crew on board the Mary Rose, the flagship of Henry VIII's navy. The scientific findings of Dr Richard Madgwick, Lecturer in Archaeological Science, suggest that crew members on the Tudor warship, which sank in 1545, may have come from as far away as southern Europe and perhaps even Africa.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.03.2019
Keeping track of fragrances
Keeping track of fragrances
Fragrances are added in a wide variety of consumer products - cosmetics, detergents, cleaning agents, and air fresheners. If incompletely eliminated in wastewater treatment plants, they can end up in rivers and lakes. Companies are therefore required to perform an environmental risk assessment before fragrance compounds are used in final products.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.03.2019
Gut bacteria neutralizes disease-carrying tsetse flies
Yale School of Public Health Research Scientist Brian Weiss, Ph.D., has identified a bacterium that can colonize the gut of tsetse flies and help stop the spread of African trypanosomes, the parasites responsible for causing human sleeping sickness, a potentially fatal disease that threatens millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa every year.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 13.03.2019
Negative Emotions Can Reduce Our Capacity to Trust
It is no secret that a bad mood can negatively affect how we treat others. But can it also make us more distrustful? Yes, according to a new study, which shows that negative emotions reduce how much we trust others, even if these emotions were triggered by events that have nothing to do with the decision to trust.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.03.2019
New method to assess platelet health could help ER doctors
New method to assess platelet health could help ER doctors
Emergency room doctors often have only a few minutes to determine which patients are in need of a blood transfusion. But currently doctors have no direct method to assess the health of one of the most critical component of the blood: platelets. These tiny blood cells play a huge role in helping blood clot after an injury.

Life Sciences - 13.03.2019
How the brain distinguishes between objects
How the brain distinguishes between objects
Study shows that a brain region called the inferotemporal cortex is key to differentiating bears from chairs. As visual information flows into the brain through the retina, the visual cortex transforms the sensory input into coherent perceptions. Neuroscientists have long hypothesized that a part of the visual cortex called the inferotemporal (IT) cortex is necessary for the key task of recognizing individual objects, but the evidence has been inconclusive.

Life Sciences - 13.03.2019
Courting bugs attract mates using an elastic 'snapping organ' for vibrational communication
Courting bugs attract mates using an elastic ’snapping organ’ for vibrational communication
Planthopper bugs may be small, but they attract mates from afar by sending vibrational calls along plant stems and leaves using fast, rhythmic motions of their abdomen. Researchers at the University of Oxford describe how a newly-discovered "snapping organ" enables courting bugs of both sexes to produce this shaking motion through a combination of muscle action and elastic recoil.

Life Sciences - 12.03.2019
From dandelion to car tyre
From dandelion to car tyre
In the recently published final report of the nationwide initiative "Plant Biotechnology of the Future", a project by scientists of the University of Münster has been selected as one of six research highlights of the programme. Between 2011 and 2018, plant researchers from all over Germany worked on 27 projects with 125 subprojects - funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF).

Life Sciences - Physics - 12.03.2019
Axolotl salamanders provide clues to spinal cord regeneration
Researchers are one step closer to solving the mystery of why some vertebrates can regenerate their spinal cords while others, including humans, create scar tissue after spinal cord injury, leading to lifelong damage. Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory have identified gene "partners" in the axolotl salamander that, when activated, allow the neural tube and associated nerve fibers to functionally regenerate after severe spinal cord damage.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.03.2019
Concussion from hits to the side of the head
Concussion from hits to the side of the head
Through a combination of biometric tracking, simulated modeling and medical imaging, researchers detail how hits to the side of the head cause concussion. Concussion researchers have long suggested that damage to the corpus callosum, a thick bundle of nerves that connects the brain's two halves, could result in some common side effects of concussion, like dizziness or vision problems.

Mathematics - Life Sciences - 11.03.2019
One term - three different interpretations
One term - three different interpretations
As different as the term “dynamic” is used and understood in science, so diverse are the research areas of the University of Münster, in which dynamic even plays a central role in the title. Prof. Christopher Deninger and Prof. Mario Ohlberger from the Cluster of Excellence „Mathematics Münster“, the lawyer Prof. Nils Jansen from the Cluster of Excellence „Religion and Politics“ and the biochemist Prof. Lydia Sorokin from Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence explain what they understand by the term in their research.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.03.2019
Brain Awareness Week 2019
Brain Awareness Week 2019
In celebration of Brain Awareness Week, we will give you a sneak peek into the lives of the some of the Wyss Center team. Find out how they came to work in neurotech and where they think we'll see the greatest advances in the coming years. Check back regularly! From restoring movement in paralyzed limbs to reducing tinnitus through thought, this series of interviews with the Wyss Center leadership, neuroscientists and robotics experts will put cutting edge neurotechnology in the spotlight.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.03.2019
Nature's Own Biorefinery
Nature’s Own Biorefinery
Insects are critical contributors to ecosystem functioning, and like most living organisms their co-evolution with microbes has been essential to support these functions. While many insects are infamous for wreaking havoc wherever they roam, many thousands of species go quietly about their business, providing important services essential to healthy ecosystems using the innovative biochemistry of their microbiomes.