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Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2019
New film of immune system killing bacteria could point to new therapies
New film of immune system killing bacteria could point to new therapies
New film showing how our immune system attacks bacteria may guide the development of new therapies that harness the immune system against infections. To kill bacteria in the blood, our immune system opens deadly ‘bullet holes' in their membranes, causing them to burst and die. The holes are created by structures called membrane attack complexes (MACs).

Life Sciences - Physics - 07.05.2019
Trigger for directed cell motion
When an individual cell is placed on a level surface, it does not keep still, but starts moving. This phenomenon was observed by the British cell biologist Michael Abercrombie as long ago as 1967. Since then, researchers have been thriving to understand how cells accomplish this feat. This much is known: cells form so-called lamellipodia - cellular protrusions that continuously grow and contract - to propel themselves towards signalling cues such as chemical attractants produced and secreted by other cells.

Life Sciences - 07.05.2019
Tailor made interactions between the uterus and embryo
Tailor made interactions between the uterus and embryo
One of the crucial stages of gestation is implantation of the embryo in the uterus, in contact with a tissue called the endometrium. However, the mechanisms that enable this implantation remain largely unclear. A Franco-American collaboration co-led by INRA research scientists has revealed that intense and fine-tuned crosstalk is established between the embryo and endometrium, allowing them to adapt to each other.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2019
Bacterial toxin research could improve pesticides and help treat cancer
Bacterial toxin research could improve pesticides and help treat cancer
Research into an intricate toxin delivery system found in bacteria could overcome the problem of pesticide resistance in insects, and might even lead to new cancer treatments. An international team led by Dr Michael Landsberg at The University of Queensland has revealed the detailed inner workings of the newest member of a family of naturally occurring insecticidal toxins.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.05.2019
A barrier that keeps cancer at bay
A barrier that keeps cancer at bay
Scientists at EPFL have discovered a biological "barrier" that prevents cancer cells from forming new tumors and more importantly, from metastasizing. The study examines pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and breast cancer. Activins are proteins involved in a number of important biological functions, including the regulation of the menstrual cycle, cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, metabolism, homeostasis, immune response, wound repair, and endocrine function.

Computer Science / Telecom - Life Sciences - 06.05.2019
Dataset Bridges Human Vision and Machine Learning
Neuroscience, computer vision collaborate to better understand visual information processing Neuroscientists and computer vision scientists say a new dataset of unprecedented size - comprising brain scans of four volunteers who each viewed 5,000 images - will help researchers better understand how the brain processes images.

Life Sciences - 06.05.2019
Regular Pokémon players have Pikachu on the brain
Regular Pokémon players have Pikachu on the brain
Adults who played Pokémon videogames extensively as children have a brain region that responds preferentially to images of Pikachu and other characters from the series. If your childhood involved countless hours spent capturing, training and battling Pokémon, there may be a wrinkle in your brain that is fond of images of Wobbuffet, Bulbasaur and Pikachu.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.05.2019
Why stomach pathogen is so tough to eradicate
A study by Stanford researchers employed state-of-the-art visualization techniques to reveal how Helicobacter pylori, a potentially pathogenic bacterial species that infects half the people on Earth, establishes its niche in the stomach. The stomach-dwelling bacteria Helicobacter pylori survives in the stomach - a hellish, churning vat of hydrochloric acid - by holing up inside that organ's pitlike glands and establishing squatter's rights.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.05.2019
Genetic conditions lead to range of overlapping needs in children
Deletions and duplications of DNA are responsible for wide-ranging developmental difficulties in children, finds a new study by Cardiff University.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 03.05.2019
For giant pandas, bamboo is vegetarian 'meat'
For giant pandas, bamboo is vegetarian ’meat’
New research using an approach called nutritional geometry sheds light on giant panda evolution, and their unusual transition from carnivorous ancestry to extreme specialised herbivory. Giant pandas are extremely specialised herbivores that feed almost exclusively on highly fibrous bamboo, despite descending from primarily flesh-eating carnivores.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.05.2019
A model to decipher the complexity of gene regulation
A model to decipher the complexity of gene regulation
Scientist at the Universities of Geneva and Lausanne, Switzerland, designed a framework to analyse gene regulation, and offer a model to better understand the role of the non-coding portion of the genome in disease risk. More than genes themselves, how, where and when they are expressed determine our biological traits - our phenotypes.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 02.05.2019
Single molecule puts sperm on track
Sperm start their sprint to the ovum when they detect changes in the environment through a series of calcium channels arranged like racing stripes on their tails. A team of Yale researchers have identified a key molecule that helps activate sperm and acts as a sort of cellular GPS system that guides them to the egg.

Life Sciences - 02.05.2019
Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet
Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet
Humans may be forgiven for overlooking bats. After all, many bat species are out and about when we're turning in. And generations of Dracula lore may have made us a little wary. But bats are a diverse bunch. They make up one of the largest groups of mammals, with more than 1,300 species worldwide. Up close, bat species look quite different from one another.

Life Sciences - 02.05.2019
Spider venom is a dangerous cocktail
Spider venom does not only consist of neurotoxins but also of a multitude of dangerous constituents. Researchers of the University of Bern present a summary of many years of spider venom research in a new study and show how various substances present in spider venom interact with each other and thus effectively render the spider's prey defenseless.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.05.2019
Sussex mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn't harm bees
Sussex mathematician’s breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn’t harm bees
Breakthrough ‘gene silencing' technique uses naturally occurring soil bacteria to kill specific crop-destroying pests without harming other insects or the environment Non-toxic pest control could help feed growing global population, boost organic food production and drive bio-fuel production Experiments show up to 92% more crops survive with this approach compared to no pest control A University of Sussex mathematician, Dr Konstantin Blyus

Life Sciences - 02.05.2019
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
Researchers are using a new approach to understand why same-sex behaviour is so common across the animal kingdom. In 1910, a team of scientists set off on the Terra Nova Expedition to explore Antarctica. Among them was George Murray Levick, a zoologist and photographer who would be the first researcher to study the world's largest Adélie penguin colony.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.05.2019
Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean
Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean
Arsenic is a deadly poison for most living things, but new research shows that microorganisms are breathing arsenic in a large area of the Pacific Ocean. A University of Washington team has discovered that an ancient survival strategy is still being used in low-oxygen parts of the marine environment.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.05.2019
How both mother and baby genes affect birth weight
The largest study of its kind, which has used genetic information from Bristol's Children of the 90s, has led to new insights into the complex relationships surrounding how mothers' and babies' genes influence birth weight. The research, published , identifies 190 links between our genetic code and birth weight, two-thirds of which are identified for the first time.

Life Sciences - 01.05.2019
The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees
The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.05.2019
Scientists identify genes tied to increased risk of ovarian cancer
A team of researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center , Cedars-Sinai Cancer and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has identified 34 genes that are associated with an increased risk for developing the earliest stages of ovarian cancer. The findings, published today , will both help identify women who are at highest risk of developing ovarian cancer and pave the way for identifying new therapies that can target these specific genes.