news

« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 41 - 60 of 16531.


Paleontology - Life Sciences - 07.06.2024
Second great ape species discovered at Hammerschmiede fossil site
Second great ape species discovered at Hammerschmiede fossil site
An international team of researchers has discovered a previously unknown ape species in the Hammerschmiede clay pit in southern Germany. Buronius manfredschmidi was found close to the great ape Danuvius guggenmosi , known as "Udo". This was about 12 million years ago the first ape with adaptations for walking upright and made the Hammerschmiede excavation site famous.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Boosting key protein in eye cells could prevent age-related vision loss
Boosting key protein in eye cells could prevent age-related vision loss
Increasing the levels of a key protein in the cells at the back of the eye could help protect against the leading cause of vision loss among older adults, finds a new study co-led by a UCL researcher. The findings from an international team based in the UK, US, Germany and Australia are published in Science Translational Medicine .

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Analysis: A new AI tool to help monitor coral reef health
Analysis: A new AI tool to help monitor coral reef health
PhD candidate Ben Williams (UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research and ZSL's Institute of Zoology) writes with a colleague about why they built SurfPerch, an AI led system to make it faster and easier for marine scientists to answer ecological questions. Coral reefs cover only 0.1% of the ocean's surface - yet they host 25% of all known marine species.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 06.06.2024
How nature repurposes ammonium transporters as receptors
Research team at the University of Freiburg identifies new membrane protein Sd-Amt1 A team led by Freiburg biochemist Susana Andrade has characterised a new membrane protein that allows microorganisms to repurpose ammonium transporters (Amts) as receptors. Ammonium transporters clearly distinguish between ammonium, potassium and water.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.06.2024
Key to Improving Cancer Treatments Discovered
Key to Improving Cancer Treatments Discovered
Some cancer drugs cause severe side effects because they are not working accurately enough. A team at the University of Würzburg led by biochemist Caroline Kisker has now discovered why. The small protein ubiquitin is involved in almost every cellular process in our body: it orchestrates the stability and function of the vast majority of proteins.

Life Sciences - Environment - 06.06.2024
First Week after Birth Is Critical for Development of Senses
Researchers at UZH have found that the maturation of the senses for smell and touch is closely linked in mice and that this strong interaction takes place within a narrow developmental time window. These findings not only underline the importance of environmental stimuli for brain assembly in early life, but also the interdependent development of the senses.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 06.06.2024
Maple syrup to improve animal health
Maple syrup to improve animal health
A probiotic made from maple syrup with flavor defects could theoretically enrich the gut microbiota of farm animals, improve their resistance to disease and reduce the need for antibiotics Approximately 2% of the 200 million pounds of maple syrup produced each year in Quebec suffers from a flavor defect that makes it more suitable for use as an ingredient in processed products than for consumption in its natural state.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.06.2024
Baby baboon brain anatomy predicts which hand they will use to communicate
Baby baboon brain anatomy predicts which hand they will use to communicate
By studying the brain anatomy of newborn baby baboons, a research group including several CNRS scientists 1 was able to predict what hand they would use to communicate after they had been weaned. These researchers had already found that nearly 70% of newborn baboons, like human babies, had early asymmetry in the planum temporale (PT) area of the brain.

Life Sciences - Environment - 06.06.2024
Fish out of water: How killifish embryos adapted their development
Fish out of water: How killifish embryos adapted their development
The annual killifish lives in regions with extreme drought. A research group at the University of Basel now reports in "Science" that the early embryogenesis of killifish diverges from that of other species. Unlike other fish, their body structure is not predetermined from the outset. This could enable the species to survive dry periods unscathed.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Research to limit COVID-19 risk in people with Down syndrome
Research to limit COVID-19 risk in people with Down syndrome
A first-of-its kind brain organoid grown at The University of Queensland has helped researchers identify therapies that reduce the impact of COVID-19 on people with Down syndrome. Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) Senior Research Fellow Dr Mohammed Shaker and organoid expert Professor Ernst Wolvetang worked with a team to develop a synthetic organoid that mirrors the brain of a person with Down syndrome, to explore why people born with the genetic condition are more vulnerable to the coronavirus.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Novel AI method could improve tissue, tumor analysis and advance treatment of disease
Research team hopeful that new computational statistics method can provide more detailed information for precision health treatment plans Study: Accurate and efficient integrative reference-informed spatial domain detection for spatial transcriptomics Researchers at the University of Michigan and Brown University have developed a new computational method to analyze complex tissue data that could transform our current understanding of diseases and how we treat them.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
Training cognitive control in children does not change brain or behaviour
Training exercises designed to improve cognitive control in children do not make a significant difference to their ability to delay gratification or to their academic achievement, nor do they lead to any brain changes, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The findings, published in Nature Neuroscience , appear to debunk the popular idea that brain training could improve cognitive control - the mental processes that allow us to set and pursue shortor long-term goals - and thereby lead to tangible benefits to other real-life outcomes.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.06.2024
Restless legs syndrome: new approaches for treatment
Restless legs syndrome: new approaches for treatment
Largest genetic study on RLS to date An international team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Munich has conducted the largest genetic investigation of restless legs syndrome (RLS) to date. The study represents a significant advancement in deciphering the genetic basis of this disorder and opens novel pathways for patient care.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
'Missing' sea sponges discovered
’Missing’ sea sponges discovered
The discovery, published in Nature, opens a new window on early animal evolution. At first glance, the simple, spikey sea sponge is no creature of mystery. No brain. No gut. No problem dating them back 700 million years. Yet convincing sponge fossils only go back about 540 million years, leaving a 160-million-year gap in the fossil record.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
Prostate cancer: Protein identified to reduce tumour growth
As prostate cancer progresses, it becomes increasingly aggressive and can metastasise. In this form, the tumour is difficult to treat, which is reflected in high mortality rates: Worldwide, the malignant disease of the prostate is the second most common cause of cancer death in men. An international study led by Lukas Kenner (MedUni Vienna) and Sabine Lagger (Vetmeduni Vienna) has now identified a protein that could slow tumour growth.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
Scientists identify 'missing piece' required for blood stem cell self-renewal
Scientists identify ’missing piece’ required for blood stem cell self-renewal
Health + Behavior Study could help make lifesaving stem cell transplants more available Key takeaways Blood stem cells - key to transplants that are used as lifesaving treatments for blood cancers and blood and immune disorders - have the capacity to self-renew, but quickly lose their ability to do so in a lab dish.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviours in offspring from obese mice
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviours in offspring from obese mice
Maternal obesity in pregnancy changes the eating behaviours of offspring by increasing long-term levels of particular molecules known as microRNAs in the part of the brain that controls appetite - but this can be changed by exercise during pregnancy, a study in obese mice has suggested.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.06.2024
New technique reveals how gene transcription is coordinated in cells
By capturing short-lived RNA molecules, scientists can map relationships between genes and the regulatory elements that control them. The human genome contains about 23,000 genes, but only a fraction of those genes are turned on inside a cell at any given time. The complex network of regulatory elements that controls gene expression includes regions of the genome called enhancers, which are often located far from the genes that they regulate.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.06.2024
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviors in offspring from obese mice
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviors in offspring from obese mice
Maternal obesity in pregnancy changes the eating behaviors of offspring by increasing long-term levels of particular molecules known as microRNAs in the part of the brain that controls appetite - but this can be changed by exercise during pregnancy, a study in obese mice has suggested.

Environment - Life Sciences - 04.06.2024
What environmental impact can a contraceptive molecule have?
What environmental impact can a contraceptive molecule have?
What environmental impact can a contraceptive molecule have? Recent work by UNamur researchers answers this question, and has just been published in the journal Environment International. This work is the fruit of a three-year collaboration with Mithra, a Belgian biotech company committed to transforming women's health with innovative alternatives, particularly in contraception, funded by SPW Research.