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Life Sciences - Physics - 16.04.2021
Not as dense - New 3D imaging technique allows deep insights into subcellular structures
Using a new microscope and methods from biophysics and biochemistry, scientists from the IRI Life Sciences at Humboldt-Universität and the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Light succeeded in visualizing the density of the spindle and the surrounding cell interior Left: A new imaging setup allows for correlative fluorescence and quantitative phase imaging.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.04.2021
Novel antibiotic deceives bacteria through mimicry
Novel antibiotic deceives bacteria through mimicry
Most antibiotics need to penetrate their target bacteria. But Darobactin, a newly discovered compound, is much too large to do so. Nonetheless, it kills many antibiotic-resistant pathogens - by exploiting a tiny weak spot on their surface. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now revealed the amazing mechanism at play and thereby opened the door to developing completely new medicines.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2021
Largest public database on genetic variants that regulate colonic gene expression
Largest public database on genetic variants that regulate colonic gene expression
A collaboration between Catalan and American researchers has resulted in the largest public databank known to date on data about gene expression and colonic genetic variants.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2021
Worm infections leave African women more vulnerable to STIs
Worm infections leave African women more vulnerable to STIs
Intestinal worm infections can leave women in sub-Saharan Africa more vulnerable to sexually-transmitted viral infections, a new study reveals. The rate and severity of sexually-transmitted viral infections (STI) in the region are very high, as are those of worm infections, which when caught in the intestine can change immunity in other parts of the body.

Life Sciences - Physics - 14.04.2021
Breakthrough with Quantum Materials Pushes Biologically Inspired Learning Devices
UC San Diego physicists create new nano-scale 'neuristor' that mimics brain functions To Oleg Shpyrko, the brain is the ultimate device. For certain tasks, the human brain can outperform powerful computers, yet requires the energy output of a light bulb. As one example, the cybersecurity tests required before entering certain websites—picking out pictures of buses and street signs—demonstrate the agility of the human mind over the processing mechanics of a robot.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.04.2021
Of Apples and Oil Pumpkins: News from Microbiome Research
Of Apples and Oil Pumpkins: News from Microbiome Research
The extent to which the composition of the microbiome of apples and oil pumpkins depends on the geographical location and what insights can be derived from this for breeding, health and shelf life of the fruits is shown in two recent publications by researchers at TU Graz. Additional pictures for download at the end in the text We refer to the microbiome as the community of microorganisms that exist in or on all organisms, including bacteria and fungi.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2021
Half of children with inflammatory syndrome after COVID-19 have neurologic symptoms
Half of children with inflammatory syndrome after COVID-19 have neurologic symptoms
Half of young people who developed the rare but serious multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19 had neurologic symptoms or signs when they entered the hospital, according to preliminary research led by UCL academics. Those symptoms included headaches, encephalopathy and hallucinations.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.04.2021
RNA holds the reins in bacteria: U-M researchers observe RNA controlling protein synthesis
RNA holds the reins in bacteria: U-M researchers observe RNA controlling protein synthesis
To better understand how RNA in bacteria gives rise to protein-and along the way, target these processes in the design of new antibiotics-researchers are turning their attention to the unique way this process happens in bacteria. In eukaryotic cells, transcription (the process by which information in a DNA strand is copied into messenger RNA) and translation (the process by which a protein is synthesized by the ribosome from the mRNA) are two successive steps.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.04.2021
'All-in-One' Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
’All-in-One’ Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
Lensless Imaging System Affirms Phage Therapy's Value in Treating Serious Infection, Tracks Phage Resistance and Could Easily Be Implemented in Compact Devices at Phage Labs GRENOBLE, France - April 13, 2021 - A team of French and Swiss scientists has demonstrated a lensless imaging technique that could easily be implemented in cost-effective and compact devices in phage laboratories to accelerate phage-therapy diagnosis.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2021
Is it Possible to Slow Down Age-Related Memory Loss?
A team of researchers from Berlin, Dortmund, and Graz are investigating how the substance spermidine can protect aging brain cells. No 062/2021 from Apr 13, 2021 According to a recent study, age-related memory loss may be preventable. Researchers from Freie Universität Berlin, the NeuroCure Cluster of Excellence, the Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften (ISAS) in Dortmund, and the University of Graz found that the substance spermidine - something that is present in all human cells - can protect the mitochondria found in aging brain cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2021
When two worlds meet: a protease that controls small RNA activity
When two worlds meet: a protease that controls small RNA activity
The protection of genome integrity of germ cells is essential for animal fertility. Researchers from the Grosshans group characterized a defense mechanism against selfish genetic elements in the C. elegans germline. They identified a protein processing mechanism that controls the activity of small RNAs to achieve specific silencing of transposons while sparing endogenous genes.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 13.04.2021
Joyful Screams Perceived More Strongly than Screams of Fear or Anger
The human scream signals more than fear of imminent danger or entanglement in social conflicts. Screaming can also express joy or excitement. For the first time, researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated that non-alarming screams are even perceived and processed by the brain more efficiently than their alarming counterparts.

Life Sciences - 12.04.2021
New Jurassic flying reptile reveals the oldest opposed thumb
New Jurassic flying reptile reveals the oldest opposed thumb
A new 160-million-year-old arboreal pterosaur species, dubbed 'Monkeydactyl', has the oldest true opposed thumb - a novel structure previously not known in pterosaurs. An international team of researchers from China, Brazil, UK, Denmark and Japan have described a new Jurassic pterosaur Kunpengopterus antipollicatus, which was discovered in the Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning, China.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 12.04.2021
Unusual fossil reveals last meal of prehistoric pollinator
Unusual fossil reveals last meal of prehistoric pollinator
An amber fossil of a Cretaceous beetle has shed some light on the diet of one of the earliest pollinators of flowering plants. The animal's remains were unearthed by researchers at the University of Bristol and the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) who were able to study its fossil faecal matter, which was composed solely of pollen.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.04.2021
Postnatal molecular changes associated with the fetal inflammatory response have been identified in extremely preterm newborns
The molecular changes observed after birth reveal for the first time a postnatal alteration of adaptive immunity in extremely preterm newborns affected by fetal inflammatory response before birth. A new study provides the largest catalogue to date of postnatal molecular changes associated with the fetal inflammatory response in extremely preterm newborns.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.04.2021
Researchers call for greater awareness of unintended consequences of CRISPR gene editing
Researchers call for greater awareness of unintended consequences of CRISPR gene editing
CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing can lead to unintended mutations at the targeted section of DNA in early human embryos, researchers have revealed. This highlights the need for further research into the effects of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, especially when used to edit human DNA in laboratory research. We and others are trying to develop and refine the tools to assess these complex mutations.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.04.2021
Rice, Baylor part of research effort to advance genome editing
Rice, Baylor part of research effort to advance genome editing
Somatic Cell Genome Editing Consortium funded by NIH By MOLLY CHIU Special to the Rice News Researchers from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine are part of a national effort to accelerate genome-editing research and develop gene-editing technologies and therapies. The goals and planned activities of the Somatic Cell Genome Editing Consortium ( SCGE ) were described in a paper published in Nature by more than 70 principal investigators on 45 SCGE projects funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.04.2021
We don't know how most mammals will respond to climate change
We don’t know how most mammals will respond to climate change
Researchers at the University of Oxford, alongside international collaborators, have found that there is a significant knowledge gap in the risks posed by climate change to mammals. In their systematic review, published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, the scientists identify that there are significant blanks about the risks to mammals in regions most vulnerable to climate change, including boreal and tropic areas.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2021
Understudied Mutations Have Big Impact on Gene Expression
Variable number tandem repeats modulate genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, obesity, cancer and other conditions An international team of researchers led by computer scientists at the University of California San Diego have identified 163 variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs) that actively regulate gene expression.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2021
Urolithin A shows effective against muscular dystrophy
Urolithin A shows effective against muscular dystrophy
A new study published in Science Translational Medicine by EPFL professor Johan Auwerx and scientists from EPFL start-up Amazentis highlights the effectiveness of mitophagy-stimulating molecule Urolithin A in mice to cure a disease similar to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. And points to a possible treatment for affected people.