« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 61 - 80 of 10298.


Life Sciences - 02.05.2019
Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet
Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet
Humans may be forgiven for overlooking bats. After all, many bat species are out and about when we're turning in. And generations of Dracula lore may have made us a little wary. But bats are a diverse bunch. They make up one of the largest groups of mammals, with more than 1,300 species worldwide. Up close, bat species look quite different from one another.

Life Sciences - 02.05.2019
Spider venom is a dangerous cocktail
Spider venom does not only consist of neurotoxins but also of a multitude of dangerous constituents. Researchers of the University of Bern present a summary of many years of spider venom research in a new study and show how various substances present in spider venom interact with each other and thus effectively render the spider's prey defenseless.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.05.2019
Sussex mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn't harm bees
Sussex mathematician’s breakthrough on non-toxic pest control which doesn’t harm bees
Breakthrough ‘gene silencing' technique uses naturally occurring soil bacteria to kill specific crop-destroying pests without harming other insects or the environment Non-toxic pest control could help feed growing global population, boost organic food production and drive bio-fuel production Experiments show up to 92% more crops survive with this approach compared to no pest control A University of Sussex mathematician, Dr Konstantin Blyus

Life Sciences - 02.05.2019
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality
Researchers are using a new approach to understand why same-sex behaviour is so common across the animal kingdom. In 1910, a team of scientists set off on the Terra Nova Expedition to explore Antarctica. Among them was George Murray Levick, a zoologist and photographer who would be the first researcher to study the world's largest Adélie penguin colony.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.05.2019
Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean
Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean
Arsenic is a deadly poison for most living things, but new research shows that microorganisms are breathing arsenic in a large area of the Pacific Ocean. A University of Washington team has discovered that an ancient survival strategy is still being used in low-oxygen parts of the marine environment.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.05.2019
How both mother and baby genes affect birth weight
The largest study of its kind, which has used genetic information from Bristol's Children of the 90s, has led to new insights into the complex relationships surrounding how mothers' and babies' genes influence birth weight. The research, published , identifies 190 links between our genetic code and birth weight, two-thirds of which are identified for the first time.

Life Sciences - 01.05.2019
The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees
The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.05.2019
Scientists identify genes tied to increased risk of ovarian cancer
A team of researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center , Cedars-Sinai Cancer and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has identified 34 genes that are associated with an increased risk for developing the earliest stages of ovarian cancer. The findings, published today , will both help identify women who are at highest risk of developing ovarian cancer and pave the way for identifying new therapies that can target these specific genes.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.05.2019
Antidote to deadly box jellyfish sting
Antidote to deadly box jellyfish sting
A team of pain researchers in the Charles Perkins Centre studied the most venomous creature on earth to learn how venom works and what causes pain. Researchers at the University of Sydney have discovered an antidote to the deadly sting delivered by the most venomous creature on earth - the Australian box jellyfish.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.05.2019
Would you like maggots with that?
Would you like maggots with that?
University of Queensland researchers are investigating the use of maggots, locusts and other alternative proteins in a range of specialty foods. University of Queensland Meat Science Professor Dr Louwrens Hoffman said conventional livestock industries would not be able to meet worldwide demand for meat, and alternatives were needed to replace or complement traditional protein sources.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.04.2019
Faculty elected to National Academy of Sciences
Karla Kirkegaard, Mark Krasnow, Todd Martinez and William Weis are now part of an organization created in 1863 to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Four Stanford researchers are among the 100 newly elected members of the National Academy of Sciences.

Life Sciences - 30.04.2019
Screening for rare but important disease ’biomarkers’ gets an accuracy boost
Researchers have created a system that can detect and quantify small and rare biological molecules that are important for detecting disease early. Certain molecules in biological fluids like blood and urine can be indicators of disease, especially if they become more prevalent. However, in the early stages of disease these ‘biomarkers' are rare and can be difficult to detect.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 30.04.2019
Offers insight into the proteins in the brain that detect cannabis
Offers insight into the proteins in the brain that detect cannabis
Researchers at the University of Bristol have made new progress in understanding how cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs), the proteins that detect the active components of marijuana, are controlled in the brain. The brain contains about 100 billion nerve cells that are constantly communicating with one another at specialised junctions called synapses.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.04.2019
Pesticide exposure causes bumblebee flight to fall short
Pesticide exposure causes bumblebee flight to fall short
Bees exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide fly only a third of the distance that unexposed bees are able to achieve. Flight behaviour is crucial for determining how bees forage, so reduced flight performance from pesticide exposure could lead to colonies going hungry and pollination services being impacted.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.04.2019
Scientists solve the 800 year old mystery of an ancient bone disease
Scientific research at the molecular level on a collection of medieval skeletons from Norton Priory in Cheshire could help rewrite history after revealingthey were affected by an unusual ancient form of the bone disorder, Paget's disease. The study, coordinated by researchers at the University of Nottingham, involved analysing proteins and genetic material preserved in the bones and teeth that are more than 800 years old.

Life Sciences - 29.04.2019
Hormones that mimic the womb might help brain heal from multiple sclerosis
FINDINGS UCLA researchers stimulated brain repair in mice with two of the most widely used analogues for multiple sclerosis by treating them with estrogen. The hormone induced the expression of cholesterol synthesis genes in cells that make myelin, the protective coating around nerves. The researchers found that mechanisms underlying this process, called remyelination, appeared to mimic known processes of myelination when the fetal brain is developing and is exposed naturally to a related estrogen in the mother's blood.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.04.2019
¤8m research project aims to develop new ’cure’ for epilepsy
A new European research project which aims to heal epilepsy by regenerating brain tissue and ‘training' neurons is getting underway. The five-year, ¤8m Hybrid Enhanced Regenerative Medicine Systems project - HERMES - brings together 12 partners from seven EU countries to heal brain disorders using transplants which combine biological and artificial components.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.04.2019
New technique may improve detection and treatment of advanced brain cancer
In a new study, Yale Cancer Center scientists have demonstrated a powerful method to analyze how tumor cells are altered as they metastasize, or spread, to the brain. The research, published in the journal Cell Reports , may eventually improve early diagnosis and treatment of metastatic brain cancer, whose incidence is climbing and whose treatments are typically limited.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 26.04.2019
Lifetime flu vaccine?
Another year, another flu vaccine because so far scientists haven't managed to make a vaccine that protects against all strains of flu. A new approach could end that ritual and protect against deadly pandemic flu. If the virus that causes flu were an ice cream cone, then the yearly vaccine teaches the immune system to recognize just the scoop - chocolate one year, strawberry the next.

Life Sciences - Physics - 26.04.2019
Simulation Shows How Dynamin Releases Vesicles from Cell Membranes
A computer simulation developed by biological physicists at Carnegie Mellon University has determined how the protein dynamin works with the cell membrane to bring important molecules into the cell. Their findings, published in eLife , can be used to better study the role the process plays in dynamin-related diseases like Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases.