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Environment - Life Sciences - 08.04.2021
Illuminating a sea turtle mystery
Illuminating a sea turtle mystery
North Pacific loggerhead turtles' years-long oceanic journeys remain poorly understood. Using data from satellite tracking and other techniques, scientists reveal a unique phenomenon that may explain the endangered migrants' pathway. By Rob Jordan Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment "Not all those who wander are lost...

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 08.04.2021
Modern Human Brain Originated in Africa Around 1.7 Million Years Ago
Modern Human Brain Originated in Africa Around 1.7 Million Years Ago
The human brain as we know it today is relatively young. It evolved about 1.7 million years ago when the culture of stone tools in Africa became increasingly complex. A short time later, the new Homo populations spread to Southeast Asia, researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown using computed tomography analyses of fossilized skulls.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.04.2021
Leaking calcium in neurons an early sign of Alzheimer’s pathology
Alzheimer's disease is known for its slow attack on neurons crucial to memory and cognition.  But why are these particular neurons in aging brains so susceptible to the disease's ravages, while others remain resilient? In a new study published April 8 in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia, The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association , researchers at the Yale School of Medicine found that susceptible neurons in the prefrontal cortex develop a "leak" in calcium storage with advancing age.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.04.2021
Face, brain development share many genes
Researchers at Stanford and KU Leuven have identified more than 70 genes that affect variation in both brain and facial structure. The genes don't influence cognitive ability, further debunking beliefs that intelligence can be assessed by facial features. Even when you assume your best poker face, you reveal something about what's in your head, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford Medicine and KU Leuven , a university in Belgium.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 07.04.2021
Using AI to Diagnose Neurological Diseases Based on Motor Impairment
New Heidelberg approach: analysing movement patterns through machine learning The way we move says a lot about the state of our brain. While normal motor behaviour points to a healthy brain function, deviations can indicate impairments owing to neurological diseases. The observation and evaluation of movement patterns is therefore part of basic research, and is likewise one of the most important instruments for non-invasive diagnostics in clinical applications.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.04.2021
The Incredible Bacterial 'Homing Missiles' That Scientists Want to Harness
The Incredible Bacterial ’Homing Missiles’ That Scientists Want to Harness
A Berkeley Lab-led team is digging into the bizarre bacteria-produced nanomachines that could fast-track microbiome science Imagine there are arrows that are lethal when fired on your enemies yet harmless if they fall on your friends. It's easy to see how these would be an amazing advantage in warfare, if they were real.

Physics - Life Sciences - 07.04.2021
Artificial intelligence to explore the biomolecular world
Artificial intelligence to explore the biomolecular world
Scientists have developed AI-powered nanosensors that let researchers track various kinds of biological molecules without disturbing them.  The tiny world of biomolecules is rich in fascinating interactions between a plethora of different agents such as intricate nanomachines (proteins), shape-shifting vessels (lipid complexes), chains of vital information (DNA) and energy fuel (carbohydrates).

Life Sciences - Health - 06.04.2021
Scientists confirm bacteria's genetic 'Swiss army knife' is key driver of antibiotic resistance
Scientists confirm bacteria’s genetic ’Swiss army knife’ is key driver of antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is a huge challenge facing society globally, posing a threat not only to human health but in areas such as food security and the economy.

Life Sciences - 06.04.2021
How the fly selects its reproductive male
How the fly selects its reproductive male
Researchers from the University of Geneva have discovered a very small protein in Drosophila that plays a key role in how females select the semen that will fertilize its eggs when it mates with several males. Even a well-characterized genome, such as that of the Drosophila the so-called fruit fly, still holds surprises.

Life Sciences - 06.04.2021
Neanderthal Ancestry Identifies Oldest Modern Human Genome
In an article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution , an international team of researchers sequence the genome of an almost complete skull first discovered in ZlatÃoe Kůň, Czechia in the early 1950s and now stored in the National Museum in Prague. The segments of Neanderthal DNA in its genome were longer than those of the Ust-Ishim individual from Siberia, the previous oldest modern human sequenced, suggesting modern humans lived in the heart of Europe more than 45,000 years ago.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.04.2021
A protein with a dual role: both repair and mutation
A protein with a dual role: both repair and mutation
The Mfd protein repairs bacterial DNA, but can also, to scientists' surprise, promote mutation. Bacterial mutations can lead to antibiotic resistance. Understanding this second "role" of the Mfd protein opens up opportunities for combating antibiotic resistance, and also the resistance of tumours to anti-cancer drugs and therapies.

Life Sciences - Art and Design - 05.04.2021
An artful study of cellular development in leaves
Virginia Lopez-Anido: Drawing series: Nature of scientific inquiry. Untitled, pencil on paper, 8.5 x 11.7 in, 2021. In theme with the drawing series, a new paper by Camila Lopez-Anido, Dominique Bergmann and their colleagues serves as another layer of our understanding of how molecular principles define cell fate decisions and enable integration of environmental cues.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.04.2021
New Blueprint of Brain Connections Reveals Extensive Reach of Central Regulator
Map of basal ganglia connectivity uncovers key links with implications for range of disorders Thousands of our daily activities, from making coffee to taking a walk to saying hello to a neighbor, are made possible through an ancient collection of brain structures tucked away near the center of the cranium.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.04.2021
International team identifies genetic link between face and brain shape
An interdisciplinary team led by KU Leuven and Stanford has identified 76 overlapping genetic locations that shape both our face and our brain. What the researchers didn't find is evidence that this genetic overlap also predicts someone's behavioural-cognitive traits or risk of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.04.2021
Distinct Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms Tied to Different Brain Pathways
Identification of neural circuits clarifies motor vs. cognitive symptoms, aiding efforts to improve treatments Parkinson's disease (PD) is well known as a debilitating disease that gradually worsens over time. Although the disease's progression has been largely tied to the loss of motor functions, non-motor symptoms, including the loss of cognitive abilities, often emerge early in the disease.

Life Sciences - 01.04.2021
Beauty and attractiveness are not universally perceived
Beauty and attractiveness are not universally perceived
Facial beauty and attractiveness are not universally perceived. Instead, according to new research, it is culture and individual preferences that shape the diverse spectrum of what we think is facially attractive. A new study, led by researchers at the University of Glasgow's Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology and published today in Current Biology, modelled individual preferences for attractive faces in two cultures, Western European and East Asian.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.04.2021
Cutting-edge Cryo-EM reveals key insight into vital DNA repair process
New research, using cutting-edge cryo-electron microscopy (CryoEM), has revealed key insights into a vital DNA repair process, which is implicated in resistance to cancer treatments. Led by the University of Glasgow and published in Nature Structural Biology, the research is based on data and models collected from the Scottish Centre for Macromolecular Imaging (SCMI) and was conducted with colleagues at the University of Dundee.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.03.2021
Gene therapy technique shows potential for repairing damage caused by glaucoma and dementia
Gene therapy technique shows potential for repairing damage caused by glaucoma and dementia
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have shown in animal studies that gene therapy may help repair some of the damage caused in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as glaucoma and dementia. Their approach demonstrates the potential effectiveness of gene therapy in polygenic conditions - that is, complex conditions with no single genetic cause.

Life Sciences - 31.03.2021
A brain signature that predicts vulnerability to addiction
A team of neurobiologists at the Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) has just shown that within a population of rats it can predict which will become cocaine addicts. One of the criteria for addiction in rats is the compulsive search for a drug despite its negative consequences.

Life Sciences - Environment - 31.03.2021
Analysis of ancient bones reveals Stone Age diet details
Fish was not on the menu of the hunter-gatherers of southern Europe 27,000 years ago. Surprisingly, people on the Iberian Peninsula in the Late Gravettian period mostly ate plants and land animals such as rabbits, deer and horses. An international team of researchers has been able to determine this for the first time on the basis of an isotope study of human fossils from the Serinyà caves in Catalonia.