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Results 41 - 60 of 131.


Linguistics / Literature - Art and Design - 22.03.2016
Researchers to investigate the connection between languages and creativity
A new Oxford-led research programme will explore the crucial role of creativity in the use of languages and investigate more creative forms of language learning, providing a forum for universities, schools and other partners to forge a new and more cohesive identity  for modern foreign languages (MFL).

Physics - Linguistics / Literature - 11.03.2016
Physical gestures play key role in human communication, Stanford research shows
When communicating with others, people often make physical gestures to complement their verbal descriptions, yet the study of human communication generally overlooks this dynamic, Stanford psychologist Herbert Clark says. When talking with others, people routinely describe and point at things with their hands, arms, heads, faces, eyes and bodies – with or without props.

Linguistics / Literature - 07.03.2016
AI crossword-solving application could make machines better at understanding language
A web-based machine language system solves crossword puzzles far better than commercially-available products, and may help machines better understand language.  Despite recent progress in AI, problems involving language understanding are particularly difficult. Felix Hill Researchers have designed a web-based platform which uses artificial neural networks to answer standard crossword clues better than existing commercial products specifically designed for the task.

Life Sciences - Linguistics / Literature - 25.02.2016
Randy red-backed fairy-wrens’ duets reduce cuckoldry
The courtship and mating behaviors of the perky Australian red-backed fairy-wren have evolved into nothing short of a free-for-all. The rampant promiscuity of both sexes is legendary. What's a fairy-wren to do to keep from wasting energy raising another male's chicks? New research from scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology provides a surprising answer: Sing with your mate.

Linguistics / Literature - Health - 20.11.2015
Language Use in Later Life
Research Workshop of Université catholique de Louvain and Freie Universität Berlin from December 7 to 9, 2015 How does language use change with increasing age? What can psychologists learn from linguists and vice versa? And how can the findings of linguistic research be useful for health care workers, care givers, relatives, and senior citizens themselves? These and other issues will be addressed by the participants of a research workshop that will take place from December 7 to 9, 2015, at Universität Louvain (UCL).

Life Sciences - Linguistics / Literature - 18.11.2015
’Alice in Wonderland’ leads researchers into the brain
Alice in Wonderland is 150 years old this year but the ever-young adventurer recently led Cornell researchers to a part of the brain that helps listeners understand her story. Cornell faculty member John Hale's study, " Modeling fMRI time courses with linguistic structure at various grain sizes ," published in Proceedings of the 6th Workshop on Cognitive Modeling and Computational Linguistics, examines how the individual words of Lewis Carroll's famous tale come together to yield an understanding of each sentence.

Life Sciences - Linguistics / Literature - 11.11.2015
Artistic works influence our minds and nervous systems, Stanford scholar reveals
Stanford theater historian Matthew Wilson Smith's new research shows how 19 th century brain science has nerved its way into the drama of our lives, both onstage and off. Wikipedia Research by French neurologist Guillaume Duchenne de Boulogne in the 19th century influenced entertainers who used new information about brain sciences to manipulate their audiences.

History / Archeology - Linguistics / Literature - 09.11.2015
Academics to investigate unopened letters from 'lost mailbag' from 17th century
A haul of undelivered letters from the 17th-century recently discovered in the Netherlands will be analysed by an international team of academics. 600 unopened letters found in a postmaster's trunk were discovered in The Hague's Museum voor Communicatie in 2012, along with 2,000 opened but undelivered letters.

Social Sciences - Linguistics / Literature - 26.10.2015
A glimpse of India
Kevin Greenbank, archivist at the Centre of South Asian Studies, explores the ways in which the home movie offers fascinating insights into the lives of those in front of, and behind, the camera - as rare footage of a 1935 Raj picnic shows. The Collection is perhaps most interesting when the films reveal something unintended by the film-maker Kevin Greenbank For most people, owning a mobile phone also means owning a video camera.

History / Archeology - Linguistics / Literature - 01.09.2015
Stanford scholar discovers unknown Magna Carta scribe
Literary scholar Elaine Treharne painstakingly examined every letter and punctuation mark of the Salisbury Magna Carta in making her discovery about the document's origin. (Photo illustration by L.A. Cicero) Using handwriting analysis, Stanford manuscript expert Elaine Treharne shows for the first time that one of the world's most famous documents was written not by the king's own scribes, but by a cathedral scribe outside the central court.

History / Archeology - Linguistics / Literature - 24.08.2015
Stanford historian says falsified medieval history helped create feminism
Through research into the first historians of medieval Europe, Professor Paula Findlen discovers that an interest in women's history began much earlier than is assumed. The British Library Detail of a miniature of medieval writer Christine de Pizan. Stanford historian Paula Findlen has studied Renaissance biographies of medieval women and says these often embellished tales represent a kind of feminism.

Art and Design - Linguistics / Literature - 05.08.2015
Operating theatre teams should review use of background music, study suggests
Operating theatre teams should review use of background music, study suggests
An analysis of video footage shows that some operating theatre teams are negatively affected by background music, during surgery. Researchers suggest that the decision to play music during an operation should be made by the entire team, taking into account both the benefits and the risks. The study, published today (5 August) in the Journal of Advanced Nursing , suggests that communication within the theatre team can be impaired when music is playing.

Linguistics / Literature - Psychology - 28.07.2015
Genders Differ Dramatically in Evolved Mate Preferences
AUSTIN, Texas - Men's and women's ideas of the perfect mate differ significantly due to evolutionary pressures, according to a cross-cultural study on multiple mate preferences by psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin. The study of 4,764 men and 5,389 women in 33 countries and 37 cultures showed that sex differences in mate preferences are much larger than previously appreciated and stable across cultures.

Linguistics / Literature - Psychology - 02.07.2015
Americans embrace positive feelings, while Chinese prefer a balance, Stanford research shows
European Americans want to maximize positive feelings and minimize negative ones more than Chinese people do, new Stanford research shows. European Americans prefer positive feelings over negative ones while Chinese tend to experience a balance between the two, new Stanford research shows. "Culture teaches us which emotional states to value, which can in turn shape the emotions we experience," said Stanford psychology Professor Jeanne Tsai , director of the Culture and Emotion Lab on campus.

Linguistics / Literature - 22.05.2015
"Material Text Cultures" CRC to Continue Its Successful Work
The Collaborative Research Centre "Material Text Cultures. Materiality and Presence of Writing in Non-Typographic Societies" (CRC 933) will continue its successful work at Heidelberg University for another four years. After an international expert evaluation, the German Research Foundation (DFG) approved a second funding period in the amount of approx. 10 million euros.

Linguistics / Literature - 12.05.2015
Baby talk: babies prefer listening to their own kind
Everyone likes to look at young babies. But who wants to listen? Well...it turns out that other babies do. In fact, a McGill University/UQAM research team has discovered that 6-month-old infants appear to be much more interested in listening to other babies than they are in listening to adults.

Psychology - Linguistics / Literature - 10.04.2015
Shakespeare Wrote Contested Play, Suggests Psychological Text Analysis
Shakespeare Wrote Contested Play, Suggests Psychological Text Analysis
AUSTIN, Texas - Through the use of text-analysis software, University of Texas at Austin psychology researchers have identified William Shakespeare as the author of the long-contested play "Double Falsehood," as described this week in the journal Psychological Science . Questioning the authorship of the works of famous writers has always been a form of blood sport in the humanities, said James Pennebaker, the Liberal Arts Regents Centennial Professor of Psychology at the university and co-author of the study.

Event - Linguistics / Literature - 23.03.2015
Speaking a second language makes you see the world differently
Bilingual speakers have two minds in one body, new research has revealed. Speaking two languages literally changes the way we see the world, and bilingual speakers think differently to those who only use their native tongue. The new research by Panos Athanasopoulos, Professor of Linguistics and English language at Lancaster University, has found that bilinguals think and behave like two different people, depending on the language context they are operating in.

Art and Design - Linguistics / Literature - 17.02.2015
Communicating emotions
Mandarin-speaking Chinese more likely to read emotions in voices of others; English-speaking North Americans rely more on facial expressions Mandarin-speaking Chinese more likely to read emotions in voices of others; English-speaking North Americans rely more on facial expressions If you are a Mandarin-speaker from China and want to understand how someone else is feeling, you are likely to concentrate on their voice rather than on their face.

Economics / Business - Linguistics / Literature - 10.02.2015
New book finds economic fears lead to political inaction
Why aren't people who care deeply about issues like job loss, health care costs and college debt politically active on these issues? Why aren't mobilization efforts more effective? Cornell political scientist Adam Seth Levine lays out an answer to the puzzle in his new book, "American Insecurity: Why Our Economic Fears Lead to Political Inaction.

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