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Health - Apr 26
Health
Individualized nutrition not only causes hospital patients to consume more protein and calories, but also improves clinical treatment outcomes. This has been demonstrated in a study by researchers from the University of Basel and Aarau Cantonal Hospital in the journal The Lancet. People who struggle to eat and drink properly following an illness are at risk of consuming too little protein and energy.
Health - Apr 26
Health

The first formal centre for psychedelic research in the world will launch at Imperial College London today.

Environment - Apr 25

Climate change results in warmer ocean temperatures, melting glaciers and more extreme weather patterns. Scientists have also observed its effects on the clams, snails, worms, crabs, urchins, starfish and more living on and in the deep seafloor off Alaska, as the ecosystem shifted from arctic to sub-arctic within the last few decades.

Physics - Apr 25
Physics

For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale.

Pharmacology - Apr 25

Medical researchers at the University of Nottingham and NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre are part of a major new international research project to improve the safety and regulation in the development of drugs.


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Health - Pharmacology - 26.04.2019
Individual nutrition shows benefits in hospital patients
Individual nutrition shows benefits in hospital patients
Individualized nutrition not only causes hospital patients to consume more protein and calories, but also improves clinical treatment outcomes. This has been demonstrated in a study by researchers from the University of Basel and Aarau Cantonal Hospital in the journal The Lancet. People who struggle to eat and drink properly following an illness are at risk of consuming too little protein and energy.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.04.2019
Imperial launches world's first Centre for Psychedelics Research
Imperial launches world’s first Centre for Psychedelics Research
The first formal centre for psychedelic research in the world will launch at Imperial College London today. Funded by more than £3 million from five founding donors, the new Imperial Centre for Psychedelic Research will build on over a decade of pioneering work in this area carried out at Imperial, including a clinical trial that has kick-started global efforts to develop psilocybin therapy into a licensed treatment for depression.

Physics - Materials Science - 25.04.2019
Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors
Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors
For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. They used diamond quantum sensors to determine the strength of the magnetization of individual atomic layers of the material chromium triiodide.

Environment - 25.04.2019
Alaskan seashells reveal a changing Arctic
Climate change results in warmer ocean temperatures, melting glaciers and more extreme weather patterns. Scientists have also observed its effects on the clams, snails, worms, crabs, urchins, starfish and more living on and in the deep seafloor off Alaska, as the ecosystem shifted from arctic to sub-arctic within the last few decades.

Pharmacology - Health - 25.04.2019
Researchers in international drive to develop safer drugs
Medical researchers at the University of Nottingham and NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre are part of a major new international research project to improve the safety and regulation in the development of drugs. The team of experts in drug-induced liver injury will be members of the Translational Safety Biomarker Pipeline (TransBioLine) - a pioneering project which will generate data to support the development of novel safety biomarkers for five target organ systems (kidney, liver, pancreas, vascular and central nervous system) for use in drug development.

Computer Science / Telecom - 25.04.2019
KU Leuven researchers make themselves invisible to AI cameras
A cardboard sign with a colourful print. That's all researchers from the Faculty of Engineering Technology at KU Leuven needed to fool a smart camera. To be clear: Wiebe Van Ranst, Simen Thys, and Toon Goedemé from the EAVISE research group don't have evil intentions. Quite the opposite. Their research aims to expose the weaknesses of intelligent detection systems.  "Smart detection systems rely on pattern recognition," says Professor Goedemé, head of EAVISE (Embedded and Artificially Intelligent Vision Engineering) at De Nayer Campus.

Health - 25.04.2019
World Malaria Day 2019 - measurable gains, hard work ahead
As we reflect on the state of malaria today-World Malaria Day 2019-one very exciting milestone has been achieved. The pilot implementation of RTS,S, the world's first licensed vaccine for any parasitic disease has been launched in Malawi, Kenya and Ghana. This is an exciting step, but malaria is far from defeated.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.04.2019
Brain’s support network may play key role in attention deficit, hyperactivity behaviors
A new UCLA study suggests that brain cells called astrocytes, previously thought to provide mainly nourishment and housekeeping functions for neurons, may play a key role in the regulation of attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, is estimated to affect about 7 percent of children and adults in the U.S. Although the disorder has been the subject of much scientific and public discussion and research in recent years, the causes for the rise in ADHD are still unclear.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 25.04.2019
Fast, efficient artificial synapse developed
Fast, efficient artificial synapse developed
A battery-like device could act as an artificial synapse within computing systems intended to imitate the brain's efficiency and ability to learn. The brain's capacity for simultaneously learning and memorizing large amounts of information while requiring little energy has inspired an entire field to pursue brain-like - or neuromorphic - computers.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.04.2019
Chemical probes pave the way for a better understanding of disease development
Chemical probes pave the way for a better understanding of disease development
Researchers can now tag proteins in live cells that have modifications associated with disease. Proteins produced in cells often undergo modifications by enzymes after they are formed. One type of modification, called prenylation, adds ‘tags' to proteins that tells them where to go in the cell and how to interact with other proteins.

Physics - 25.04.2019
New insights into quantum measurements
Researchers from the University of Bristol have shed new light on the process of quantum measurement, one of the defining, and most quantum features of quantum mechanics. As reported in Physical Review Letters , Dr Paul Skrzypczyk and Professor Noah Linden looked at the way in which we gain information about the world at the quantum scale through the process of measurement.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.04.2019
Intestinal organoid development mimics regeneration
Intestinal organoid development mimics regeneration
Intestinal organoids are three-dimensional structures derived from a single intestinal stem cell. They are great tools for applications ranging from fundamental biology to personalized and regenerative medicine. However, despite their relevance in research, it is still unclear how a single cell can give rise to a fully formed organoid.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 25.04.2019
Bridge Over Coupled Waters: Scientists 3D-Print All-Liquid 'Lab on a Chip'
Bridge Over Coupled Waters: Scientists 3D-Print All-Liquid ’Lab on a Chip’
Berkeley Lab researchers set the stage for new class of 3D-printed, all-liquid devices; could automate chemical synthesis for batteries and drug formulations Researchers at DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have 3D-printed an all-liquid device that, with the click of a button, can be repeatedly reconfigured on demand to serve a wide range of applications - from making battery materials to screening drug candidates.

Social Sciences - 25.04.2019
School choice does not achieve social mix across schools
A new study has found that school choice is associated with higher levels of segregation among school children from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. Research by the University of Bristol and Cardiff University, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, shows that far from encouraging integration and equal opportunity, choice-based systems are associated with higher levels of pupil segregation; potentially leading to schools that are more homogenous in their social composition.

Environment - 25.04.2019
Alternative to animal experiments: Fish cell test internationally certified
Alternative to animal experiments: Fish cell test internationally certified
In 2017, more than 7,500 ecotoxicological tests were carried out on fish in Switzerland alone with the aim of protecting humans, animals and the environment. For many years, Eawag has been researching alternatives in order to reduce or even replace fish experiments. One of these alternatives involves experiments with a gill cell line of rainbow trout (RTgill W1 cell line), which can be used to reliably determine the acute toxicity of water samples and many chemicals to fish.

Health - 25.04.2019
How to keep your bones strong
Think you should slow down as you get older? Think again! Weight-bearing and muscle strengthening exercises are important for building bone strength and preventing osteoporosis, however, new research shows that even just getting your 10,000 steps a day can be important for keeping your bones strong.

Social Sciences - 25.04.2019
School choice does not achieve social mix across schools
A new study has found that school choice is associated with higher levels of segregation among school children from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. Research by Cardiff University and the University of Bristol, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, shows that far from encouraging integration and equal opportunity, choice-based systems are associated with higher levels of pupil segregation; potentially leading to schools that are more homogenous in their social composition.

Health - 25.04.2019
One in two Swiss people will have smoked weed by 2045
One in two Swiss people will have smoked weed by 2045
Three decades from now, nearly half of the Swiss population will have had some experience with cannabis use. According to a new study by the University of Zurich, the number of active users will rise as well, increasing by 50% compared to 2015 - unless the government establishes new regulations. Countries such as Canada and Uruguay have introduced new paradigms when it comes to regulating the sale and consumption of cannabis.

Environment - 25.04.2019
EPFL helps revitalize Sarine River habitats downstream of Rossens dam
EPFL helps revitalize Sarine River habitats downstream of Rossens dam
Researchers at EPFL conducted a large-scale experiment downstream of Rossens arch dam, employing a laboratory-developed method to successfully preserve wildlife habitats.  The absence of natural flood events means that, downstream of dams, rivers always flow at the same rate. The channel bed silts up as time passes, and the lack of sediment replenishment degrades fish and invertebrate habitats and causes species diversity to decline.  Until recently, this very fate had befallen the Sarine River downstream of the Rossens arch dam in Fribourg Canton.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.04.2019
Astroparticle physicists observe the longest half-life ever directly measured
Astroparticle physicists observe the longest half-life ever directly measured
The universe is almost 14 billion years old. An inconceivable length of time by human standards - yet compared to some physical processes, it is but a moment. There are radioactive nuclei that decay on much longer time scales. An international team of scientists has now directly measured the rarest decay process ever recorded in a detector.
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