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Mechanical Engineering - 25.03.2020
Ankle exoskeleton makes running easier
Researchers find that a motorized device that attaches around the ankle and foot can drastically reduce the energy cost of running. Running is great exercise but not everyone feels great doing it. In hopes of boosting physical activity - and possibly creating a new mode of transportation - engineers at Stanford University are studying devices that people could strap to their legs to make running easier.

Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering - 28.02.2020
More efficient, longer-lasting solid oxide fuel cells
More efficient, longer-lasting solid oxide fuel cells
Researchers at EPFL have developed a novel way to increase fuel-cell efficiency and lifespan, using a recirculation fan driven by a steam turbine that runs on steam-lubricated bearings. Solid oxide fuel cells, or SOFCs, are devices that produce both electricity and heat by oxidizing a fuel such as natural gas or biogas.

Mechanical Engineering - 26.02.2020
Overlooked arch in the foot is key to its evolution and function
A long-overlooked part of the human foot is key to how the foot works, how it evolved, and how we walk and run, a Yale-led team of researchers said. The discovery upends nearly a century of conventional thinking about the human foot and could open new avenues to explore in evolutionary biology as well as guide new designs for robotic and prosthetic feet, said the study team.

Mechanical Engineering - 21.02.2020
Scientists finally confirm a 50-year-old theory in mechanics
An experiment by EPFL researchers has confirmed a theory that has been used in mechanics for over half a century - despite never having been fully validated. The team could now use the theory in bolder and more innovative ways in their quest to develop ever better energy systems. Some theories are widely used even though they have never been experimentally validated.

Mechanical Engineering - Innovation - 17.12.2019
Innovative ’biplane’ design could lead to next generation of wind turbines
Biplanes, the fixed-wing aircrafts with two wings, one above the other, exist today mostly in aviation museums, World War I movies and black-and-white photos. But thanks to an innovation by UCLA engineers, that two-wing design could soon be used to make wind turbines that harvest energy more efficiently.

Mechanical Engineering - 16.12.2019
Bristol discovery reveals tractionless motion is possible
Bristol discovery reveals tractionless motion is possible
In an article published in Physical Review Letters, Bristol scientists have answered the fundamental question: "Is it possible to move without exerting force on the environment?", by describing the tractionless self-propulsion of active matter. Understanding how cells move autonomously is a fundamental question for both biologists and physicists.

Mechanical Engineering - 25.11.2019
Understanding how raptors hear may help prevent future wind turbine deaths
While wind turbines provide sustainable energy solutions, they also pose a threat - raptors that hunt by day, such as eagles and hawks, are frequent casualties of turbine collisions.  Researchers at The Raptor Center (TRC) in the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine hypothesized that adding devices to turbines that emit sound could deter eagles from approaching them, but they first had to determine what eagles can and can not hear.

Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 21.11.2019
Eliminating cracks in 3D-printed metal components
Eliminating cracks in 3D-printed metal components
Researchers at EPFL have developed a new laser 3D-printing technique to manufacture metal components with unprecedented resistance to high temperature, damage and corrosion. The method has applications in fields ranging from aerospace to power-generating turbines. 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has revolutionized the way components are made, setting new standards in terms of production speed when geometric complexity is high.

Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 18.11.2019
Alliance for additive manufacturing
Alliance for additive manufacturing
TUM, Oerlikon and Linde develop high-strength lightweight aluminum-based alloy New research alliance for additive manufacturing Together with the Swiss technology group Oerlikon and the industrial gas manufacturer Linde, the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has entered into a research alliance for additive manufacturing (AM).

Mechanical Engineering - 27.09.2019
Ariane 6's core engine completes qualification tests
Ariane 6’s core engine completes qualification tests
Ariane 6, Europe's next-generation launch vehicle, has passed another key development milestone. Its Vulcain 2.1 liquid-fuelled engine has now completed its qualification testing, which means combined tests can now begin. The main stage Vulcain 2.1 engine will deliver 135 t of thrust to propel Ariane 6 in the first eight minutes of flight up to an altitude of 200 km.

Mechanical Engineering - 25.07.2019
Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question
Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question
Advanced simulations have solved a problem in turbulent fluid flow that could lead to more efficient turbines and engines. When a fluid, such as water or air, flows fast enough, it will experience turbulence - seemingly random changes in velocity and pressure within the fluid. From my first days studying fluid mechanics I had some fundamental questions that I wanted to know the answers to.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 01.07.2019
Steering wind power in a new direction
Four of the turbines on a TransAlta Renewables wind farm in Alberta, Canada, that were used for the wake-steering experiment. The truck in the lower left corner of the photo gives a sense of the wind turbines' size. (Image credit: Calgary Drone Photography) On a working wind farm, Stanford researchers have shown that angling turbines slightly away from the wind can boost energy produced overall and even out the otherwise variable supply.

Environment - Mechanical Engineering - 12.04.2019
Taking a cue from spider webs, UCLA researchers snag fresh water with vapor capture system
Taking a cue from spider webs, UCLA researchers snag fresh water with vapor capture system
Inspired by how dew drops form on spider webs, UCLA engineers and mathematicians have designed a unique and effective water vapor capture system that could be used to produce clean, fresh water, or to recycle industrial water that would otherwise be wasted. Their system is a dense array of parallel cotton threads strung vertically, with a steady stream of water droplets flowing down the strings.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 08.02.2019
Gummy-like robots could help prevent disease
Gummy-like robots could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. These soft, biocompatible robots could be used for targeted therapy and to help diagnose and prevent disease. Human tissues experience a variety of mechanical stimuli that can affect their ability to carry out their physiological functions, such as protecting organs from injury.

Mechanical Engineering - 19.12.2018
3D-printed robot hand ’plays’ the piano
Scientists have developed a 3D-printed robotic hand which can play simple musical phrases on the piano by just moving its wrist.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 27.11.2018
How cells generate forces
How cells generate forces
When an organism develops, masses of cells combine to form different types of tissue, all of which have different functions. In order to be able to form and to move, a cell needs to generate mechanical forces by remodelling its cytoskeleton, which consists of various filaments. Filaments from the actin protein, for example, contract and expand.

Mechanical Engineering - Chemistry - 21.11.2018
Engineers fly first-ever plane with no moving parts
Engineers fly first-ever plane with no moving parts
The silent, lightweight aircraft doesn't depend on fossil fuels or batteries. Now MIT engineers have built and flown the first-ever plane with no moving parts. Instead of propellers or turbines, the light aircraft is powered by an "ionic wind" - a silent but mighty flow of ions that is produced aboard the plane, and that generates enough thrust to propel the plane over a sustained, steady flight.

Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 02.11.2018
Identifies how 3D printed metals can be both strong and ductile
A new technique by which to 3D print metals, involving a widely used stainless steel, has been shown to achieve exceptional levels of both strength and ductility, when compared to counterparts from more conventional processes. The findings, published in Materials Today , outline how a joint research team from the University of Birmingham, UK, Stockholm University, Sweden and Zhejiang University, China were able to optimizing the process parameters during 3D printing to achieve the results.

Mechanical Engineering - 31.10.2018
A new approach to liquid-repelling surfaces
A new approach to liquid-repelling surfaces
Novel surface design overcomes problem of condensation that bedeviled previous systems. "Omniphobic" might sound like a way to describe someone who is afraid of everything, but it actually refers to a special type of surface that repels virtually any liquid. Such surfaces could potentially be used in everything from ship hulls that reduce drag and increase efficiency, to coverings that resist stains and protect against damaging chemicals.

Mechanical Engineering - 11.09.2018
Security flaws leave keyless Tesla cars vulnerable to theft
A team of researchers at COSIC, an imec research group at the University of Leuven, has uncovered serious security flaws in the Passive Keyless Entry and Start (PKES) system used by some luxury vehicles. The study shows that the key fob (the unlocking device) used by the Tesla Model S is using out-dated and inadequate cryptography.
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