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Mechanical Engineering - 09.02.2016
A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving
A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving
A fifth of car fuel-efficiency savings are eroded by increased driving Around a fifth of the energy-saving benefits of fuel-efficient cars are eroded because people end up driving them more, according to a study into British motoring habits over the last 40 years. Using data from 1970 to 2011, energy experts at the University of Sussex found a long-term 'rebound effect' among British car-drivers of around 20 per cent.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 05.02.2016
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage
The rate that fish are captured by predators can double when boats are motoring nearby, according to pioneering work led by the University of Exeter and co-authored by the University of Bristol, published today in Nature. Dr Stephen Simpson of Exeter's Biosciences department and an international research team, including Bristol's Dr Andy Radford , found that noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 25.01.2016
Acoustic tweezers manipulate cells with sound waves
Acoustic tweezers manipulate cells with sound waves
Engineers at MIT, Penn State University, and Carnegie Mellon University have devised a way to manipulate cells in three dimensions using sound waves. These "acoustic tweezers" could make possible 3-D printing of cell structures for tissue engineering and other applications, the researchers say. Designing tissue implants that can be used to treat human disease requires precisely recreating the natural tissue architecture, but so far it has proven difficult to develop a single method that can achieve that while keeping cells viable and functional.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 20.01.2016
Autonomous Ground Vehicles and Aircraft Demonstrate New Collaborative Capabilities for Keeping Warfighters Safe
Autonomous Ground Vehicles and Aircraft Demonstrate New Collaborative Capabilities for Keeping Warfighters Safe-CMU News - Carnegie Mellon University CMU's unmanned ground vehicle. Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Sikorsky, a Lockheed Martin Company, using a UH-60MU BLACK HAWK helicopter enabled with Sikorsky's MATRIX™ Technology and CMU's Land Tamer® autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV), recently participated in a joint autonomy demonstration that proved the capability of new, ground-air cooperative missions.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 18.01.2016
It's a 3D printer, but not as we know it
It’s a 3D printer, but not as we know it
3D printing techniques have quickly become some of the most widely used tools to rapidly design and build new components. A team of engineers at the University of Bristol has developed a new type of 3D printing that can print composite materials, which are used in many high performance products such as tennis rackets, golf clubs and aeroplanes.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 15.01.2016
How a Developmental Gene Controls Feeding Behaviour
How a Developmental Gene Controls Feeding Behaviour
In experiments on the fruit fly model organism Drosophila melanogaster, Heidelberg University biologists gained new insight into how feeding behaviour is encoded and controlled. The research team led by Ingrid Lohmann of the Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) studied the function of a special developmental gene of the Hox gene family.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 23.12.2015
Researchers create exceptionally strong and lightweight new metal
Magnesium infused with dense silicon carbide nanoparticles could be used for airplanes, cars, mobile electronics and more Matthew Chin At left, a deformed sample of pure metal; at right, the strong new metal made of magnesium with silicon carbide nanoparticles. Each central micropillar is about 4 micrometers across.

Computer Science - Mechanical Engineering - 10.12.2015
Lie-detecting software uses real court case data
ANN ARBOR-By studying videos from high-stakes court cases, University of Michigan researchers are building unique lie-detecting software based on real-world data. Their prototype considers both the speaker's words and gestures, and unlike a polygraph, it doesn't need to touch the subject in order to work.

Environment - Mechanical Engineering - 27.11.2015
Earth's first ecosystems were more complex than previously thought, study finds
Earth’s first ecosystems were more complex than previously thought, study finds
Computer simulations have allowed scientists to work out how a puzzling 555-million-year-old organism with no known modern relatives fed, revealing that some of the first large, complex organisms on Earth formed ecosystems that were much more complex than previously thought. The international team of researchers from Canada, the UK and the USA, including Dr Imran Rahman from the University of Bristol, studied fossils of an extinct organism called Tribrachidium , which lived in the oceans some 555 million years ago.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 27.11.2015
Cholesterol-lowering statins could help tackle breast cancer
Cholesterol-lowering statins could help tackle breast cancer
A new study by researchers from Imperial College London suggests statins could help fight hard-to-treat cancers. The research, published today , reveals that tumours rely heavily on cholesterol for growth. Cholesterol-lowering statins - which are currently prescribed to around 30 million people worldwide, can block this supply - causing it to 'starve' and die.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 13.11.2015
3D printing aids in understanding food enjoyment
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Tasting food relies on food volatiles moving from the back of the mouth to the nasal cavity, but researchers have wondered why airflow doesn't carry them in the other direction, into the lungs. Now a team of engineers, using a 3D printed model of the human airway from nostril to trachea, has determined that the shape of the airway preferentially transfers volatiles to the nasal cavity and allows humans to enjoy the smell of good food.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 11.11.2015
Power up: cockroaches employ a "force boost" to chew through tough materials
New research indicates that cockroaches use a combination of fast and slow twitch muscle fibres to give their mandibles a "force boost" that allows them to chew through tough materials.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 10.11.2015
In First Real-World Example, Penn Study Shows Mechanical and Manual CPR Produce Equivalent Survival Rates for Cardiac Arrest Patients
Mechanical CPR, in which a device is used by Emergency Medical Service (EMS) providers to deliver automated chest compressions during cardiac arrest resuscitation care, is associated with an equivalent survival rate for patients experiencing cardiac arrest outside of the hospital as manual CPR, according to new findings from a team of researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 28.10.2015
Computer simulations reveal feeding in early animal
Computer simulations reveal feeding in early animal
Scientists have used computer simulations to reconstruct feeding in the common ancestor shared between humans and starfish, which lived over half a billion years ago. The international team of researchers from the UK and Spain, led by Dr Imran Rahman from the University of Bristol, tested competing theories for feeding in a 510-million-year-old fossil using computational fluid dynamics, an engineering tool.

Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 22.10.2015
The ductility of magnesium explained
The ductility of magnesium explained
22. Zhaoxuan Wu and William Curtin of the Laboratory for Multiscale Mechanics Modeling (LAMMM) have solved the 40-year-old scientific riddle of the low ductility magnesium. Magnesium is the lightest metal found on earth; it is four times lighter than steel and a third lighter than aluminum. It is also abundantly available, being the eight most common element in the earth's crust.

Mechanical Engineering - 20.10.2015
New study explores gender bias in academic hiring
When all else is equal between highly qualified candidates for entry-level faculty positions, professors in academic science overwhelmingly prefer women over men, Cornell researchers previously found in national experiments. But would this pro-female bias be strong enough to elevate slightly less impressive women above more accomplished male candidates?

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 19.10.2015
New Technique Developed by Team Including CMU President Suresh Removes Defects While Keeping Materials Strong
New Technique Developed by Team Including CMU President Suresh Removes Defects While Keeping Materials Strong-CMU News - Carnegie Mellon University When designing a new material, whether for an airplane, car, bridge, mobile device, or biological implant, engineers strive to make the material strong and defect-free.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 15.10.2015
Good neighbours turn bad: Helper cells in the brain could hold the clue to Motor Neuron Disease
Helper cells in the brain, which support nerve function, change their behaviour with the progression of Motor Neuron Disease (MND), a new study has found. Researchers at the Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) discovered the star-shaped cells, called astrocytes, progressively lose the ability to support motor neurons as MND progresses leading to the death of the specialised nerve cells that control our movements.

Mechanical Engineering - Mathematics - 15.10.2015
Artificial whisker reveals source of harbor seal’s uncanny prey-sensing ability
Harbor seals have an amazingly fine-tuned sense for detecting prey, as marine biologists have noted for years. Even when blindfolded, trained seals are able to chase the precise path of an object that swam by 30 seconds earlier. Scientists have suspected that the seal's laser-like tracking ability is due in part to its antennae-like whiskers.

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 25.09.2015
Offshore wind farms could be more risky for gannets than previously thought
Offshore wind farms which are to be built in waters around the UK could pose a greater threat to protected populations of gannets than previously thought, research led by the University of Leeds says. It was previously thought that gannets, which breed in the UK between April and September each year, generally flew well below the minimum height of 22 metres above sea level swept by the blades of offshore wind turbines.
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