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Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering - 15.04.2015
New materials repel oil underwater, could better clean up oil spills
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have announced a significant step forward in the development of materials that can ward off oil - a discovery that could lead to new protective coatings and better approaches to cleaning up oil spills. In a new paper in the journal Advanced Functional Materials , professor of chemical and biological engineering David Lynn and assistant scientist Uttam Manna describe new coatings that are extremely oil-repellant (or "superoleophobic") in underwater environments.

Mechanical Engineering - Mathematics - 15.04.2015
Patents forecast technological change
How fast is online learning evolving? Are wind turbines a promising investment? And how long before a cheap hoverboard makes it to market? Attempting to answer such questions requires knowing something about the rate at which a technology is improving. Now engineers at MIT have devised a formula for estimating how fast a technology is advancing, based on information gleaned from relevant patents.

Economics / Business - Mechanical Engineering - 09.04.2015
Engineers to showcase leading research to industry
Renewable energy technologies, future cities and novel in-car parameter estimators are just some innovative research from the University of Bristol's Faculty of Engineering that will be showcased to industry later this month. The Faculty of Engineering Research Showcase is held every two years and enables the faculty to strengthen and develop existing partnerships with industry and to start new collaborations.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 06.04.2015
Penn, Johns Hopkins and UCSB Research: Differences in Neural Activity Change Learning Rate
Penn, Johns Hopkins and UCSB Research: Differences in Neural Activity Change Learning Rate
Why do some people learn a new skill right away, while others only gradually improve? Whatever else may be different about their lives, something must be happening in their brains that captures this variation. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Johns Hopkins University have taken a network science approach to this question.

Psychology - Mechanical Engineering - 31.03.2015
Thinking inside the box
New research into the phenomenon of design fixation - allowing prior experience to blind us to new possibilities - may help in the development of new tools and strategies that help to stimulate the creative process without inadvertently limiting it. Fixation can stop the creative process cold: severely limiting the way in which we see a problem and the variety of solutions we explore Nathan Crilly It's a common occurrence: when faced with a problem which is similar to one which has been faced before, most people will default to what worked in the past.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 23.03.2015
How do humans interact with a changing visual world?
A new £1.4 million research project led by the University of Bristol will use engineering and science in the design of radically new approaches and solutions to vision-based technology. Researchers from the University's Bristol Vision Institute (BVI) have been awarded an Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Platform Grant for their project ' Vision for the future '.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 18.03.2015
New research suggests insect wings might serve gyroscopic function
New research suggests insect wings might serve gyroscopic function
Gyroscopes measure rotation in everyday technologies, from unmanned aerial vehicles to cell phone screen stabilizers. Though many animals can move with more precision and accuracy than our best-engineered aircraft and technologies, gyroscopes are rarely found in nature. Scientists know of just one group of insects, the group including flies, that has something that behaves like a gyroscope - sensors called halteres , clublike structures that evolved from wings.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 17.03.2015
Teaching Science to the Brain: Carnegie Mellon Scientists Discover How the Brain Learns the Way Things Work
Teaching Science to the Brain: Carnegie Mellon Scientists Discover How the Brain Learns the Way Things Work-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University By Shilo Rea / 412-268-6094 / shilo [a] cmu (p) edu When you learn a new technical concept, something happens in your brain, but exactly what has been a mystery until now.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 17.03.2015
Opening a window on quantum gravity
Yale University has received a grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation to fund experiments that researchers hope will provide new insights into quantum gravity. Jack Harris, associate professor of physics, will lead a Yale team that aims to address a long-standing question in physics - how the classical behavior of macroscopic objects emerges from microscopic constituents that obey the laws of quantum mechanics.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 16.03.2015
Cyborg beetle research allows free-flight study of insects
Hard-wiring beetles for radio-controlled flight turns out to be a fitting way to learn more about their biology. Cyborg insect research led by engineers at UC Berkeley and Singapore's Nanyang Technological University (NTU) is enabling new revelations about a muscle used by beetles for finely graded turns.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 12.03.2015
Penn and ExxonMobil Researchers Address Long-standing Mysteries Behind Anti-wear Motor Oil Additive
Penn and ExxonMobil Researchers Address Long-standing Mysteries Behind Anti-wear Motor Oil Additive
The pistons in your car engine rub up against their cylinder walls thousands of times a minute; without lubrication in the form of motor oil, they and other parts of the engine would quickly wear away, causing engine failure. Motor oil contains chemical additives that extend how long engines can run without failure, but, despite decades of ubiquity, how such additives actually work to prevent this damage have remained a mystery.

Mechanical Engineering - Physics - 09.03.2015
Popular origami pattern makes the mechanical switch
Popular origami pattern makes the mechanical switch
An origami paper-folding pattern called the square twist is the basis of a microscopic switch that Cornell physicists say could lead to origami-inspired materials and machines. Their demonstration of a square twist mechanical switch, the size of a speck of dust, is detailed , March 9. First author Jesse Silverberg, Ph.D.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 09.03.2015
Popular origami pattern makes the switch
Popular origami pattern makes the switch
An origami paper-folding pattern called the square twist is the basis of a microscopic switch that Cornell physicists say could lead to origami-inspired materials and machines. Their demonstration of a square twist mechanical switch, the size of a speck of dust, is detailed , March 9. First author Jesse Silverberg, Ph.D.

Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering - 20.02.2015
Researchers identify keys to improved polymer solar cells
UCLA Engineering A UCLA graduate student researcher with two of the polymers used in developing more efficient solar cell technology, as well as a polymer blend. Paving the way for lighter and more flexible solar devices, UCLA researchers have identified the key principles for developing high-efficiency polymer solar cells.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 05.02.2015
Oxygen is like kryptonite to titanium
UC Berkeley scientists have found the mechanism by which titanium, prized for its high strength-to-weight ratio and natural resistance to corrosion, becomes brittle with just a few extra atoms of oxygen. Shown is a cross section of grade 3 titanium (containing 0.3 percent oxygen) that has been put under stress and deformed.

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 08.01.2015
Practice really does make perfect
New research into the way in which we learn new skills finds that a single skill can be learned faster if its follow-through motion is consistent, but multiple skills can be learned simultaneously if the follow-through motion is varied.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 02.01.2015
Québec Science’s top 10 discoveries of 2014
The Québec Science jury has spoken: three of the 10 Discoveries of the Year selected by the magazine were led by McGill-affiliated researchers. The prestigious annual list honours projects by: Gustavo Turecki, The Douglas/McGill Faculty of Medicine, Psychiatry; McGill's Department of Mechanical Engineering professor François Barthelat; and leading Alzheimer's researcher Judes Poirier of McGill and The Douglas.

Mechanical Engineering - 02.12.2014
Shark-shaped sampler to hunt down ‘fugitive’ air pollution
Industrial sites and highways could become cleaner in the future thanks to shark-shaped samplers that hunt 'fugitive' air pollutants. Scientists at Lancaster University and the Environment Agency are working together to develop a new sampler to measure levels of so-called fugitive pollutants - such as particulates, and gases such as ammonia and nitrogen dioxide.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 01.12.2014
New research could transform high speed optical networks
Press release issued: 1 December 2014 There is an ever growing demand for high speed internet communication systems. New research has shown optical switching technology built on nanoantenna reflectarrays and tunable materials could transform high speed optical networks. The study by Dr Maciej Klemm and Professor Martin Cryan from the University of Bristol's Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering is published in the journal, Optics Express .

Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering - 14.11.2014
New method for methanol processing could reduce carbon dioxide emissions
New method for methanol processing could reduce carbon dioxide emissions
Researchers at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have developed a more efficient way to turn methanol into useful chemicals, such as liquid fuels, and that would also reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Methanol, which is a product of natural gas, is well-known as a common "feedstock" chemical — one that is processed into gasoline and other chemicals such as solvents, adhesives, paints and plastics.
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