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Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 30.05.2014
Stem cells take initial step toward development in the lab
Stem cells take initial step toward development in the lab
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. The gap between stem cell research and regenerative medicine just became a lot narrower, thanks to a new technique that coaxes stem cells, with potential to become any tissue type, to take the first step to specialization. It is the first time this critical step has been demonstrated in a laboratory.

Mechanical Engineering - 21.05.2014
Scientists at Stanford and MIT find new way to harness waste heat
Scientists at Stanford and MIT find new way to harness waste heat
Researchers have developed a new battery technology that captures waste heat and converts it into electricity. Vast amounts of excess heat are generated by industrial processes and by electric power plants. Researchers around the world have spent decades seeking ways to harness some of this wasted energy.

Mechanical Engineering - Chemistry - 21.05.2014
Engineers Build World's Smallest, Fastest Nanomotor
Engineers Build World’s Smallest, Fastest Nanomotor
AUSTIN, Texas - Researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have built the smallest, fastest and longest-running tiny synthetic motor to date. The team's nanomotor is an important step toward developing miniature machines that could one day move through the body to administer insulin for diabetics when needed, or target and treat cancer cells without harming good cells.

Mechanical Engineering - Economics / Business - 19.05.2014
ESA at ILA 2014
Photo highlights from the 'Space for Earth' space pavilion at ILA, the Berlin Air and Space Show, on 21 May 2014 Photo highlights from the 'Space for Earth' space pavilion at ILA, the Berlin Air and Space Show, on 20 May 2014 Taking weather forecasting into the future 20 May 2014 The first documents signalling the go-ahead for Europe's fleet of MetOp Second Generation weather satellites were signed today in the presence of the German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Berlin Air Show.

Mechanical Engineering - Chemistry - 19.05.2014
Scientists use nanoparticles to control growth of materials
Scientists use nanoparticles to control growth of materials
UCLA-led team creates 'diet control' technique that could have broad applications in manufacturing and medicine Matthew Chin Growth is a ubiquitous phenomenon in plants and animals. But it also occurs naturally in chemicals, metals and other inorganic materials. That fact has, for decades, posed a major challenge for scientists and engineers, because controlling the growth within materials is critical for creating products with uniform physical properties so that they can be used as components of machinery and electronic devices.

Linguistics / Literature - Mechanical Engineering - 15.05.2014
International Group of Researchers Shows Emissions From Forests Influence Very First Stage of Cloud Formation
News Brief: Chinese Academy of Sciences Honors Carnegie Mellon President Subra Suresh as Newly Elected Foreign Member-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University : Abby Simmons / 412-268-4290 /

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 14.05.2014
Researchers create ‘ultrasonic hands’ that can grip microparticles
Press release issued: 14 May 2014 A team of researchers from the Universities of Bath, Bristol and Dundee has discovered for the first time that ultrasonic waves can be used to grab several microparticles at a time, effectively creating a pair of invisible 'ultrasonic hands' that can move tiny objects, such as cells, under a microscope.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 14.05.2014
Magnetic topological insulators developed at UCLA are 1,000 times more energy-efficient for switching
Magnetic topological insulators developed at UCLA are 1,000 times more energy-efficient for switching
Topological insulators are an emerging class of materials that act as both insulators and conductors, and could potentially be used in smartphones, computers and other electronic devices. A research team at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has developed a new class of topological insulators in which one of two layers is magnetized.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 12.05.2014
All in the Rotation
All in the Rotation
Viruses are the enigma of the biological world - despite having their own DNA and being able to adapt to their environment and evolve, they are not considered to be alive like cells. In order to reproduce and multiply - a requirement of "life" – a virus must invade a living cell, eject its DNA into that of the cell, and commandeer the cell's biological machinery.

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 23.04.2014
New shape using rubber bands
While setting out to fabricate new springs to support a cephalopod-inspired imaging project, a group of Harvard researchers stumbled upon a surprising discovery: the hemihelix, a shape rarely seen in nature. This made the researchers wonder: Were the three-dimensional structures they observed randomly occurring, or are there specific factors that control their formation? The scientists answered that question by performing experiments in which they stretched, joined, and then released rubber strips.

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 23.04.2014
Scientists characterize a new shape using rubber bands
While setting out to fabricate new springs to support a cephalopod-inspired imaging project, a group of Harvard researchers stumbled upon a surprising discovery: the hemihelix, a shape rarely seen in nature. This made the researchers wonder: Were the three-dimensional structures they observed randomly occurring, or are there specific factors that control their formation? The scientists answered that question by performing experiments in which they stretched, joined, and then released rubber strips.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 15.04.2014
Researchers transplant regenerated oesophagus
Tissue engineering has been used to construct natural oesophagi, which in combination with bone marrow stem cells have been safely and effectively transplanted in rats. The study epithelial cells and blood vessels. The new method has been developed by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, within an international collaboration lead by Professor Paolo Macchiarini.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 13.04.2014
Glasses strong as steel: A fast way to find the best
Glasses strong as steel: A fast way to find the best
Scientists at Yale University have devised a dramatically faster way of identifying and characterizing complex alloys known as bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a versatile type of pliable glass that's stronger than steel. Using traditional methods, it usually takes a full day to identify a single metal alloy appropriate for making BMGs.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 09.04.2014
Thermal and Quantum Routes to Melting
Thermal and Quantum Routes to Melting
An international team of researchers including a group from the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN) at UCL have uncovered vital information regarding the "quantum melting" of the magnetic structure of Thallium Copper Trichloride (TlCuCl 3 ), reports Nature Physics. The findings of team from the UK, Switzerland, France and China establish for the first time that thermal and quantum routes to melting behave largely independently of one another.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 09.04.2014
The Motion of the Medium Matters for Self-assembling Particles, Penn Research Shows
The Motion of the Medium Matters for Self-assembling Particles, Penn Research Shows
By attaching short sequences of single-stranded DNA to nanoscale building blocks, researchers can design structures that can effectively build themselves. The building blocks that are meant to connect have complementary DNA sequences on their surfaces, ensuring only the correct pieces bind together as they jostle into one another while suspended in a test tube.

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 31.03.2014
Better way to grow motor neurons from stem cells
University of Illinois cell and developmental biology professor Fei Wang, left; visiting scholar Qiuhao Qu, center; materials science and engineering professor Jianjun Cheng; and their colleagues improved the process of converting stem cells into motor neurons. (Neurons are green; motor neurons are red in the image on the screen).

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 26.03.2014
In-fly movie: 3D video from inside live flying insects
In-fly movie: 3D video from inside live flying insects
The flight muscles moving inside flies have been filmed for the first time using a new 3D X-ray scanning technique. 3D movies of the muscles were created by a team from Oxford University, Imperial College London, and the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), using the PSI's Swiss Light Source, a powerful X-ray source.

Mechanical Engineering - 25.03.2014
X-rays film inside live flying insects – in 3D
X-rays film inside live flying insects – in 3D
Scientists have used a particle accelerator to obtain high-speed 3D X-ray visualizations of the flight muscles of flies. The team developed a groundbreaking new CT scanning technique at the PSI's Swiss Light Source to allow them to film inside live flying insects. 3D movies of the blowfly flight motor offer a glimpse into the inner workings of one of nature's most complex mechanisms, showing that structural deformations are the key to understanding how a fly controls its wingbeat.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 14.03.2014
Just made coffee while chatting to a friend? Time to thank your ’visuomotor binding’ mechanism
Experiments have identified a dedicated information highway that combines visual cues with body motion. This mechanism triggers responses to cues before the conscious brain has become aware of them. The study shows that our brains also have separate hard-wired systems to track our own bodies visually even when we are not paying attention to them.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 14.03.2014
Human brains 'hard-wired' to link what we see with what we do
Human brains ’hard-wired’ to link what we see with what we do
Your brain's ability to instantly link what you see with what you do is down to a dedicated information 'highway', suggests new UCL-led research. For the first time, researchers from UCL and Cambridge University have found evidence of a specialised mechanism for spatial self-awareness that combines visual cues with body motion.
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