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Medicine/Pharmacology



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Medicine/Pharmacology
25.09.2017
Hospital mortality rates after heart attack differ by age
Outcomes for older patients hospitalized for a heart attack are often used as a measure of hospital quality for all patients. But a study led by Yale researchers shows that hospital mortality rates for older patients with heart attack are not necessarily representative of mortality rates for younger adults.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
25.09.2017
Human antibodies from Dengue patients effectively treat Zika infection in mice
Human antibodies from Dengue patients effectively treat Zika infection in mice
Scientists have discovered that antibodies taken from patients infected with Dengue virus are effective in treating Zika infection in rodents. The team, led by researchers at Imperial College London and Washington University in St Louis, found that giving Zika-infected mice the antibodies was enough to treat the early stages of infection, and even protected unborn pups in pregnant animals.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
25.09.2017
Study will test new technique to prevent viral infections during pregnancy
Dr. Michelle Silasi, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, will test the effectiveness of a new technique to screen for viral exposure during pregnancy that can identify women at risk for serious complications and allow for interventions to improve pregnancy outcomes.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.09.2017
Tiny diamonds could become best friends to youths with cleft palates
Tiny diamonds could become best friends to youths with cleft palates
Young people with cleft palate may one day face fewer painful surgeries and spend less time undergoing uncomfortable orthodontic treatments thanks to a new therapy developed by researchers from the UCLA School of Dentistry. The treatment incorporates a shiny twist: diamond fragments so small it would take more than 3 million of them to span the diameter of a penny.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.09.2017
Virtual reality tool developed to untangle genes
Researchers from Oxford have been using virtual reality software to compile genetic data to create models which explain how genes are controlled within their natural chromosomal environments. The team from the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (WIMM) have been working in collaboration with physicists from Universita' di Napoli and software developers and artists at Goldsmiths, University of London, to visualise complex interactions between genes and their regulatory elements in an interactive format.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.09.2017
"Humanized" Mouse Model Developed to Study Hepatitis B Infection
The ANRS consortium "Humanized Mouse Models for Viral Hepatitis"1, made up of 6 teams of researchers, has developed a mouse model for studying the interaction between the immune system and the liver following infection by the hepatitis B virus. This research, coordinated by Dr. Hélène Strick-Marchand (Inserm joint unit 1223, "Physiopathology of the Immune System", Institut Pasteur), responds to a real lack of animal models for studying this disease and thus opens up the possibilities for evaluating new therapeutic strategies.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.09.2017
The Surprising, Ancient Behavior of Jellyfish
The Surprising, Ancient Behavior of Jellyfish
At first glance, humans seem to have very little in common with Cassiopea, a primitive jellyfish. Cassiopea is brainless, spineless, and spends essentially its entire life sitting upside down on the ocean floor, pulsating every few seconds. However, Caltech scientists have now discovered that, as different as our daily schedules may seem, humans and jellyfish actually start and end their days with the same behavior: sleep.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.09.2017
Tumor metabolism helps classify hepatoblastoma
Tumor metabolism helps classify hepatoblastoma
Looking at cell metabolism instead of histology, EPFL scientists have identified new biomarkers that could help more accurately classify the two main subtypes of hepatoblastoma, a liver cancer in children. Hepatoblastoma is a rare pediatric liver cancer, usually diagnosed in the first three years of life.
Medicine/Pharmacology
21.09.2017
A dose of ’wait-and-see’ reduces unnecessary antibiotic use
Asking patients to take a ‘wait-and-see' approach before having their antibiotic prescriptions filled significantly reduces unnecessary use, a University of Queensland study has shown. The Faculty of Medicine's Primary Care Clinical Unit found less than a third of patients used antibiotics if they were advised to wait up to 48 hours to see if their symptoms resolved.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.09.2017
Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development
Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development
Researchers have used genome editing technology to reveal the role of a key gene in human embryos in the first few days of development. This is the first time that genome editing has been used to study gene function in human embryos, which could help scientists to better understand the biology of our early development.
Medicine/Pharmacology
20.09.2017
One e-cigarette with nicotine leads to adrenaline changes in nonsmokers' hearts
One e-cigarette with nicotine leads to adrenaline changes in nonsmokers’ hearts
A new UCLA study has found that healthy nonsmokers experienced increased adrenaline levels in their hearts after one electronic cigarette with nicotine. The findings are published in Journal of the American Heart Association , the open access journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.
Medicine/Pharmacology
20.09.2017
Individualized diets for irritable bowel syndrome better than placebo
Patients with irritable bowel syndrome who follow individualized diets based on food sensitivity testing experience fewer symptoms, say Yale researchers. Their study is among the first to provide scientific evidence for this medicationfree approach to a debilitating condition. As many as one in five adults meet the criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a disorder that can cause chronic abdominal pain, gas, diarrhea, and constipation.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.09.2017
Study suggests you can ‘pick up’ a good or bad mood from your friends - but it also suggests that depression doesn’t have the same effect
New research suggests that both good and bad moods can be ‘picked up' from friends, but depression can't. A team led by the University of Warwick has examined whether friends' moods can affect an individual therefore implying that moods may spread across friendship networks. The team analysed data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health which incorporates the moods and friendship networks of US adolescents in schools.
Medicine/Pharmacology
19.09.2017
Genetic risk profile predicts survival for people with severe lung disease
An international Yale-led research team has shown that a risk profile based on 52 genes accurately predicts survival for patients with a severe lung disease. If confirmed in further studies, the finding could transform the way patients are treated for the condition, which is on the rise in older adults.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.09.2017
National Cancer Institute designates UCLA brain cancer program a site of research excellence
National Cancer Institute designates UCLA brain cancer program a site of research excellence
The brain cancer program at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the UCLA Brain Tumor Center has been designated a Specialized Program of Research Excellence, or SPORE, by the National Cancer Institute, making it one of only five brain cancer programs nationwide to receive this national recognition and substantial research funding.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.09.2017
Study uncovers markers for severe form of multiple sclerosis
Scientists have uncovered two closely related cytokines - molecules involved in cell communication and movement - that may explain why some people develop progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), the most severe form of the disease. The findings, authored by researchers at Yale University, Oregon Health & Science University, and the University of California point the way toward developing a novel treatment to prevent progressive forms of the disease.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.09.2017
Behavioral therapy increases connectivity in brains of people with OCD
Behavioral therapy increases connectivity in brains of people with OCD
UCLA study reveals enhanced connections between brain regions that may compensate for underlying dysfunction Leigh Hopper UCLA researchers report that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder, when treated with a special form of talk therapy, demonstrate distinct changes in their brains as well as improvement in their symptoms.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.09.2017
Blood testing via sound waves may replace some tissue biopsies
Blood testing via sound waves may replace some tissue biopsies
Cells secrete nanoscale packets called exosomes that carry important messages from one part of the body to another. Scientists from MIT and other institutions have now devised a way to intercept these messages, which could be used to diagnose problems such as cancer or fetal abnormalities. Their new device uses a combination of microfluidics and sound waves to isolate these exosomes from blood.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.09.2017
Cells programmed like computers to fight disease
Cells can be programmed like a computer to fight cancer, influenza and other serious health conditions - breakthrough research by University of Warwick Common molecule found in humans, plants and animals can be genetically engineered into sequences - like computer code in software - to control actions of a cell Different sequences could be tailor-made to target diverse diseases or injuries - like unique apps ‘downloaded' into cells for spe
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.09.2017
A new approach to high insulin levels
A new approach to high insulin levels
Congenital hyperinsulinism is a serious yet poorly understood condition. Research funded by the SNSF has discovered how it is caused by a genetic mutation. Diabetes is characterised by a deficiency of insulin. The opposite is the case in congenital hyperinsulinism: patients produce the hormone too frequently and in excessive quantities, even if they haven't eaten any carbohydrates.
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