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Medicine / Pharmacology - Innovation / Technology - 22.06.2018
Low-cost plastic sensors could monitor a range of health conditions
Low-cost plastic sensors could monitor a range of health conditions
An international team of researchers have developed a low-cost sensor made from semiconducting plastic that can be used to diagnose or monitor a wide range of health conditions, such as surgical complications or neurodegenerative diseases. This work opens up new directions in biosensing, where materials can be designed to interact with a specific metabolite, resulting in far more sensitive and selective sensors.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Sport Sciences - 22.06.2018
High levels of oral disease among elite athletes affecting performance
High levels of oral disease among elite athletes affecting performance
Significantly high levels of oral disease found among GB's elite athletes is leading to poorer on-field performance, research by UCL's Eastman Dental Institute has concluded. In the largest ever study of its kind, more than 350 sportsmen and women from nine GB Olympic teams, including swimming and rowing, along with Team Sky, England Rugby and Reading FC, underwent an oral health screening.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 22.06.2018
Tracking cancer-cell development with
Tracking cancer-cell development with "drinkable" electronic sensors
Thanks to an unorthodox approach being proposed by EPFL researchers, patients may soon be able to track their illness simply by drinking a solution containing millions of tiny electronic sensors disguised as bacteria. Imagine being able to track the development of diseased cells in real time, simply by having patients drink a glass of water containing millions of tiny electronic biosensors.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 21.06.2018
New insights into DNA ’melting’ reveal chink in bacteria’s armour
Scientists have shed light on DNA 'melting' - a crucial process fundamental to all life. The researchers, from Imperial College London , who used bacteria in their experiments, say these findings may provide new insights into eradicating harmful bugs. How DNA melts is a fundamental part to all life - bacterial and human Professor Xiaodong Zhang Study author DNA encodes information When a cell wants to make proteins, the strands need to be pulled apart or 'melted' first, before a fundamental cellular process called transcription takes place.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 21.06.2018
Viral suppression helps lower risk for many types of cancer, study finds
A new study by the Yale School of Public Health and partner institutions is the first to examine the potential cancer prevention benefits of prolonged periods of HIV viral suppression, resulting from antiretroviral therapy, for persons living with HIV.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 21.06.2018
Alzheimer’s breakthrough: brain metals that may drive disease progression revealed
Breakthrough in description of metals in brain which may drive the progression of Alzheimer's disease, made by international research collaboration, including University of Warwick In brains affected by Alzheimer's, researchers identify chemically reduced iron species, with mineral forms including a magnetic iron oxide which they hypothesize are produced during formation of amyloid protein plaques Understanding the impact and management of these

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 21.06.2018
Dynamic modeling helps predict the behaviors of gut microbes
The human gut is teeming with microbes, each interacting with one another in a mind-boggling network of positive and negative exchanges. Some produce substances that serve as food for other microbes, while others produce toxins - antibiotics - that kill their neighbors. Scientists have been challenged trying to understand how this collection of gut microbes known as the microbiome is formed, how it changes over time and how it is affected by disturbances like antibiotics used to treat illnesses.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 21.06.2018
Carnegie Mellon Neuroscientists Map Brain’s Response to Cold Touch
Carnegie Mellon University neuroscientists have mapped the feeling of cool touch to the brain's insula in a mouse model. The findings, published in the June 15 issue of Journal of Comparative Neurology , provide an experimental model that will advance research into conditions like pain and hypersensitivity to cold and help researchers to continue to unravel the multifaceted ways touch is represented in the brain.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 21.06.2018
New treatment helps avoid deafness in child chemotherapy patients
An international trial has found that a medicine commonly used to treat poisoning is effective in reducing deafness in children receiving chemotherapy for cancer. University of Melbourne and Royal Children's Hospital paediatric oncologist Professor Michael Sullivan was international vice chair of the study, results of which are published in today's New England Journal of Medicine .

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.06.2018
Fat cells control fat cell growth
Fat cells control fat cell growth
Researchers from ETH Zurich and EPFL have discovered a new type of fat cell that suppresses the growth of new fat cells. This opens up new avenues for preventing obesity-related diseases. Obesity is the plague of our times. Some 80 percent of obese people will develop Type 2 diabetes at some point in their lives, and being overweight is also a significant risk factor for cancer and heart attacks.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Administration / Government - 20.06.2018
Existing treatment could be used for common ’untreatable’ form of lung cancer
A cancer treatment already approved for use in certain types of cancer has been found to block cell growth in a common form of lung cancer for which there is currently no specific treatment available. The new findings suggest that a large number of patients could benefit from this treatment - a second generation EGFR inhibitor (a drug that slows down or stops cell growth) - if used in combination with additional therapies.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.06.2018
The cells that control the formation of fat
The cells that control the formation of fat
A study led by researchers in Switzerland has revealed a new cell type that resides in the body's fat depots where it can actively suppress fat cell formation. This discovery was made using single-cell transcriptomics and opens entirely new avenues to combat obesity and related diseases such as diabetes.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.06.2018
Pancreatic tumors lead to weight loss
Pancreatic tumors lead to weight loss
Patients with pancreatic cancer usually experience significant weight loss, which can begin very early in the disease. A new study from MIT and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute offers insight into how this happens, and suggests that the weight loss may not necessarily affect patients' survival. In a study of mice, the researchers found that weight loss occurs due to a reduction in key pancreatic enzymes that normally help digest food.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.06.2018
A dual-therapy approach to boost motor recovery after a stroke
A dual-therapy approach to boost motor recovery after a stroke
EPFL scientists have shown that combining a brain-computer interface (BCI) with functional electrical stimulation (FES) can help stroke victims recover greater use of their paralyzed arm - even years after the stroke. Paralysis of an arm and/or leg is one of the most common effects of a stroke.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Physics / Materials Science - 19.06.2018
State of the art imaging challenges our understanding of how platelets are made
State of the art imaging challenges our understanding of how platelets are made
Correlative light-electron microscopy is being used to increase our knowledge of how platelets are made in the body and the results are challenging previously held understandings. University of Bristol Press Release State of the art imaging challenges our understanding of how platelets are made Correlative light-electron microscopy is being used to increase our knowledge of how platelets are made in the body and the results are challenging previously held understandings.

Psychology - Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.06.2018
Emotional eating in childhood is learned at home
Emotional eating in childhood is learned at home
The tendency for children to eat more or less when stressed and upset is mainly influenced by the home environment and not by genes, according to a new UCL-led study. The study, published today in Pediatric Obesity , found that genetics only play a small role in young children's emotional overeating and undereating, unlike other eating behaviours in childhood such as food fussiness.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.06.2018
Combining different malaria vaccines could reduce cases by 91 per cent
Using two experimental anti-malarial vaccines, which work in different ways, can greatly reduce the number of malaria infections in animal studies. Experimental vaccines, which independently achieve 48% and 68% reductions in malaria cases, can achieve 91% reduction when combined. Presently, each vaccine is at a different stage of human trials, and there have not been efforts to combine them.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.06.2018
Ovarian cancer cells switched off by ’unusual’ mechanism
Scientists at the Ovarian Cancer Action Research Centre at Imperial College London have discovered a mechanism that deactivates ovarian cancer cells. The findings, published in EMBO Reports , could lead to better treatments for women with ovarian cancer. The research has found a new mechanism for a protein named OPCML.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.06.2018
Trojan Horse: how a killer fungus unleashes meningitis
In a world first, University of Sydney researchers have revealed how a deadly fungus and primary cause of life-threatening meningitis exploits the immune system like a 'Trojan Horse' to promote infection. Published today in The American Journal of Pathology , the study was led by a team from the Westmead Institute for Medical Research and the Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Disease and Biosecurity of the University of Sydney.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.06.2018
Genes associated with infantile forms of schizophrenia identified
Discovery will aid diagnosis and development of treatments Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) and McGill University have identified novel genes associated with a specific form of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a major psychiatric illness affecting one per cent of the population worldwide.
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