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Microtechnics/Electroengineering



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Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
20.11.2017
Quantum dots amplify light with electrical pumping
Quantum dots amplify light with electrical pumping
The team demonstrates that using their "designer" quantum dots, they can achieve light amplification in a nanocrystal solid with direct-current electrical pumping. We have been working to develop new lasing media, using chemically synthesized quantum dots, although it had been widely believed that quantum dot lasing with electrical stimulation is simply impossible.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
16.11.2017
A new window into electron behavior
A new window into electron behavior
For the first time, physicists have developed a technique that can peer deep beneath the surface of a material to identify the energies and momenta of electrons there. The energy and momentum of these electrons, known as a material's "band structure," are key properties that describe how electrons move through a material.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
15.11.2017
Optically tunable microwave antennas for 5G applications
Optically tunable microwave antennas for 5G applications
Multiband tunable antennas are a critical part of many communication and radar systems. New research by engineers at the University of Bristol has shown significant advances in antennas by using optically induced plasmas in silicon to tune both radiation patterns and operation frequency. Conventional antenna tuning is performed with diodes or Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) switches.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
10.11.2017
A rubber power station
A rubber power station
Researchers from Empa have developed a flexible material that generates electricity when stressed. In future, it might be used as a sensor, integrated into clothing or even implanted in the human body, for instance, to power a pacemaker.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
09.11.2017
New method developed to 3D print fully functional electronic circuits
Researchers at the University of Nottingham have pioneered a breakthrough method to rapidly 3D print fully functional electronic circuits. The circuits, which contain electrically-conductive metallic inks and insulating polymeric inks, can now be produced in a single inkjet printing process where a UV light rapidly solidifies the inks.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
08.11.2017
A robotic spy among the fish
A new miniature robot developed by EPFL researchers can swim with fish, learn how they communicate with each other and make them change direction or come together. These capabilities have been proven on schools of zebrafish. Researchers at EPFL's Robotic Systems Laboratory (LSRO), which is headed by Professor Francesco Mondada, have developed a miniature robot that can integrate perfectly into schools of zebrafish.
Chemistry - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
08.11.2017
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Forgot to water that plant on your desk again? It may soon be able to send out an SOS. MIT engineers have created sensors that can be printed onto plant leaves and reveal when the plants are experiencing a water shortage. This kind of technology could not only save neglected houseplants but, more importantly, give farmers an early warning when their crops are in danger, says Michael Strano, the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT and the senior author of the new study.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
06.11.2017
Wallpaper bio-solar panel developed by researchers
Wallpaper bio-solar panel developed by researchers
A two-in-one solar bio-battery and solar panel has been created by researchers who printed living cyanobacteria and circuitry onto paper. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic micro-organisms that have been on Earth for billions of years. They are thought to be the primary reason why the Earth's atmosphere is oxygen rich.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
06.11.2017
'Smart' paper can conduct electricity, detect water
’Smart’ paper can conduct electricity, detect water
In cities and large-scale manufacturing plants, a water leak in a complicated network of pipes can take tremendous time and effort to detect, as technicians must disassemble many pieces to locate the problem. The American Water Works Association indicates that nearly a quarter-million water line breaks occur each year in the U.S., costing public water utilities about $2.8 billion annually.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Life Sciences
24.10.2017
Neuroscientists use weak electrical signal to stimulate human brain and improve memory
Neuroscientists use weak electrical signal to stimulate human brain and improve memory
FINDINGS Neuroscientists at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have discovered precisely where and how to electrically stimulate the human brain to enhance people's recollection of distinct memories. People with epilepsy who received low-current electrical pulses showed a significant improvement in their ability to recognize specific faces and ignore similar ones.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
16.10.2017
Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensors
Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensors
Researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Bedfordshire, in collaboration with multinational company ABB, have designed and tested a series of plasmonic nanoantenna arrays that could lead to the development of a new generation of ultrasensitive and low-cost fluorescence sensors that could be used to monitor water quality.
Computer Science/Telecom - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
12.10.2017
Humanoid robot tests to explore AI ethics
Humanoid robot tests to explore AI ethics
Artificial intelligence researchers at the University of Bath have been awarded 250,000 to conduct a series of unique experiments on how people interact with humanoid robots. Dr Joanna Bryson and her research group in the Department of Computer Science have received the funding from the AXA Research Fund , which supports scientific discoveries that contribute to societal progress.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
11.10.2017
Injecting Electrons Jolts 2-D Structure Into New Atomic Pattern
Injecting Electrons Jolts 2-D Structure Into New Atomic Pattern
The same electrostatic charge that can make hair stand on end and attach balloons to clothing could be an efficient way to drive atomically thin electronic memory devices of the future, according to a new study led by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
12.09.2017
A drone for last-centimeter delivery
A drone for last-centimeter delivery
A new drone developed at EPFL uses cutting-edge technology to deliver parcels weighing up to 500 grams.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Medicine/Pharmacology
04.09.2017
Electrical current provides a look inside the lungs
Electrical current provides a look inside the lungs
A new imaging technique, Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), will soon be used to monitor important bodily functions. A collaborative project between TU Wien, the Medical University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, has enabled significant progress to be made with this technology.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
30.08.2017
New soft robots really suck
EPFL scientists have created the first functional robot powered entirely by vacuum: made up of soft building blocks, it moves by having air sucked out of them.
Life Sciences - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
30.08.2017
'Seeing' robot learns tricky technique for studying brain cells in mammals
’Seeing’ robot learns tricky technique for studying brain cells in mammals
Imperial scientists have successfully taught robots to perform a challenging brain technique only previously mastered by a handful of humans. Whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology, or whole-cell recording (WCR), is the gold-standard technique for studying the behaviour of brain cells called neurons under different brain states such as stress or learning.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
25.08.2017
New Results Reveal High Tunability of 2-D Material
New Results Reveal High Tunability of 2-D Material
Berkeley Lab-led team also provides most precise band gap measurement yet for hotly studied monolayer moly sulfide Two-dimensional materials are a sort of a rookie phenom in the scientific community. They are atomically thin and can exhibit radically different electronic and light-based properties than their thicker, more conventional forms, so researchers are flocking to this fledgling field to find ways to tap these exotic traits.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
16.08.2017
Potential new state of matter
Potential new state of matter
Research is showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. "These heavy fermion materials have a different hierarchy of energy scales than is found in transition metal and organic materials, but they often have similar complex and intertwined physics coupling spin, charge and lattice degrees of freedom." Common phenomenon could be key to understanding mechanism of unconventional superconductivity LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
31.07.2017
A Semiconductor That Can Beat the Heat
A Semiconductor That Can Beat the Heat
A newly discovered collective rattling effect in a type of crystalline semiconductor blocks most heat transfer while preserving high electrical conductivity - a rare pairing that scientists say could reduce heat buildup in electronic devices and turbine engines, among other possible applications.
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