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Paleontology - Life Sciences - 16.04.2024 - Today
Seed ferns: plants experimented with complex leaf vein networks 201 million years ago
Seed ferns: plants experimented with complex leaf vein networks 201 million years ago
Flowering plant-type leaf veins died out and re-evolved several times in the course of the Earth's history According to a research team led by palaeontologists from the University of Vienna, the net-like leaf veining typical for today's flowering plants developed much earlier than previously thought, but died out again several times.

Paleontology - 09.04.2024
Do some mysterious bones belong to gigantic ichthyosaurs?
Do some mysterious bones belong to gigantic ichthyosaurs?
A study carried out at the University of Bonn sheds light on a mystery that has puzzled paleontologists for 150 years Several similar large, fossilized bone fragments have been discovered in various regions across Western and Central Europe since the 19th century. The animal group to which they belonged is still the subject of much debate to this day.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 02.04.2024
Temple bones in the skulls of dinosaurs and humans alike were formed by feeding habits
Temple bones in the skulls of dinosaurs and humans alike were formed by feeding habits
Whether human or reptile: in the skull of most terrestrial vertebrates there is a gaping hole in the temple; in the case of most reptiles, there are two. Scientists have been looking for explanations for this for 150 years. A team of researchers from the University of Tübingen and Ruhr University Bochum has now shown that the forces acting on the skull change depending on how and where food is held, bitten and chewed in the mouth - and over millions of years, these factors lead to the formation of connections and openings in the skull.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 02.04.2024
Tree of Life for modern birds revealed
Working with colleagues at the University of Copenhagen, Australian Museum and Flinders University, Professor Simon Ho and Dr Al-Aabid Chowdhury have found that the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs was a 'big bang' for bird evolution. In a world first, a team of international scientists including three Australians, Al-Aabid Chowdhury and Professor Simon Ho from University of Sydney, and Dr Jacqueline Nguyen from Australian Museum and Flinders University, have determined the family tree of modern birds and pinpointed the timing of their evolution.

Paleontology - Environment - 21.03.2024
Rays were more diverse 150 million years ago than previously thought
Rays were more diverse 150 million years ago than previously thought
New fossil ray species discovered in Bavarica, Germany: Aellopobatis bavarica from the Late Jurassic In a new study recently published in the journal Papers in Palaeontology , an international team of scientists led by palaeobiologist Julia Türtscher from the University of Vienna has explored the puzzling world of rays that lived 150 million years ago and discovered a previously hidden diversity - including a new ray species.

Environment - Paleontology - 20.03.2024
Ancient Giant Dolphin Discovered in the Amazon
Ancient Giant Dolphin Discovered in the Amazon
Measuring between 3 to 3.5 meters, 16 million years old: Paleontologists from the University of Zurich have announced the discovery of a new species of freshwater dolphin in the Peruvian Amazon region. Surprisingly, its closest living relatives can be found in the river dolphins of South Asia.

Paleontology - 13.03.2024
Newly discovered: Fossil giant turtle named after Stephen King novel character
Newly discovered: Fossil giant turtle named after Stephen King novel character
An international research team led by Dr. Gabriel S. Ferreira from the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of has described a new species of giant turtle from the late Pleistocene.

Environment - Paleontology - 07.03.2024
Earth's earliest forest revealed in Somerset fossils
Earth’s earliest forest revealed in Somerset fossils
Scientists have discovered remnants of the Earth's oldest fossil forest on the north coast of Devon and Somerset in the UK. The trees, which are around 390 million years old, are thought to have grown as part of an extensive forest covering the east coast of the Old Red Sandstone continent - part of Europe at that time.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 04.03.2024
Study of slowly evolving 'living fossils' reveals key genetic insights
Study of slowly evolving ’living fossils’ reveals key genetic insights
Yale researchers have discovered evidence of why a fish group, considered "living fossils," has existed largely unchanged for tens of millions of years. In 1859, Charles Darwin coined the term "living fossils" to describe organisms that show little species diversity or physical differences from their ancestors in the fossil record.

Paleontology - 16.02.2024
Science in motion: Predicting a dinosaur’s stride
A new Yale-led study combines 3D images and computer animation to visualize the movements of a long-extinct dinosaur. Researchers have developed a new way to visualize how ancient animals moved as they roamed the Earth - starting with a Yale-discovered dinosaur's sickle-clawed foot.

Paleontology - Environment - 09.02.2024
An exceptionally well-preserved fossil deposit discovered in southern France
An exceptionally well-preserved fossil deposit discovered in southern France
A new fossil deposit has been unearthed in the Hérault region thanks to the long-term work of a couple of amateur paleontology enthusiasts, whose discoveries have been studied by an international team involving scientists from the CNRS (1) and the University of Lausanne. With over 400 fossils dating back 470 million years, the Cabrières site near Pézenas bears witness to the closest environment ever observed to the South Pole at that time.

Paleontology - Chemistry - 06.02.2024
Surprisingly vibrant colour of 12-million-year-old snail shells
Surprisingly vibrant colour of 12-million-year-old snail shells
Researchers provide world's first evidence of intact polyene pigments in fossils Snail shells are often colourful and strikingly patterned. This is due to pigments that are produced in special cells of the snail and stored in the shell in varying concentrations. Fossil shells, on the other hand, are usually pale and inconspicuous because the pigments are very sensitive and have already decomposed.

Earth Sciences - Paleontology - 22.01.2024
VUB geologists create new toolkit to study the consequences of meteorite impact
VUB geologists create new toolkit to study the consequences of meteorite impact
What exactly happens during and immediately after the impact of a meteorite? That was the question posed by a team of geologists from the research group Archaeology, Environmental Changes & Geo-Chemistry (AMGC) at Vrije Universiteit Brussel. The Chicxulub crater in Mexico is best known because of the extinction of the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period 66 million years ago.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 11.01.2024
New dinosaur species may be closest known relative of Tyrannosaurus rex
New dinosaur species may be closest known relative of Tyrannosaurus rex
Restudy of fossils collected in New Mexico digs up key clues about T. rex's origins in North America. Published on Thursday 11 January 2024 Last updated on Thursday 11 January 2024 A new study published in Scientific Reports reshapes our understanding of how the most famous dinosaur to ever walk the earth - Tyrannosaurus rex - first arrived in North America by introducing its earliest known relative on the continent.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 03.01.2024
'Juvenile T. rex' fossils are a distinct species of small tyrannosaur
’Juvenile T. rex’ fossils are a distinct species of small tyrannosaur
Nanotyrannus was a smaller, longer-armed relative of T. rex, with a narrower snout. Published on Wednesday 3 January 2024 Last updated on Wednesday 3 January 2024 A new analysis of fossils believed to be juveniles of T. rex now shows they were adults of a small tyrannosaur, with narrower jaws, longer legs, and bigger arms than T. rex .

Paleontology - Environment - 21.12.2023
A long-known deposit yields new secrets
A long-known deposit yields new secrets
Paleontologists lack the fossils they need to trace the evolutionary history of the Amazon region, a region characterized by unparalleled biodiversity. By exploiting data from a site known for over a century, Juan Carrillo, a researcher at the University of Fribourg, and his colleagues from other institutions, have made exceptional discoveries that shed new light on this little-known past .

Paleontology - 15.12.2023
Palaeontologist cleared of fabricating data in dino-killing asteroid paper
Investigations conducted by The University of Manchester find the allegations made by Melanie During, published in Science in December 2022, that Robert DePalma " wanted to claim credit for identifying the dinosaur-killing asteroid's season of impact and fabricated data in order to be able to publish a paper before she did " were unfounded.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 15.12.2023
Southampton features in prime time Sir David Attenborough documentary
Southampton features in prime time Sir David Attenborough documentary
Researchers from the University of Southampton are set to appear in a new BBC Natural History programme revealing the secrets of a giant pliosaur, a ferocious predator which inhabited our seas at the same time as dinosaurs roamed the Earth about 150 million years ago. The documentary, titled 'Attenborough and the Giant Sea Monster' (BBC One and iPlayer, 8pm, 1 January 2024), follows Sir David Attenborough on a journey of discovery as he explores the fascinating story of an enormous marine reptile whose skull was found buried on the Dorset coast near Kimmeridge Bay.

Paleontology - Environment - 11.12.2023
What's for dinner? Paleontologist finds out through remarkable specimen
What’s for dinner? Paleontologist finds out through remarkable specimen
1st-ever prey found inside fossilized juvenile tyrannosaur leads to deeper understanding about feeding habits of these iconic predators The difference between a juvenile and adult tyrannosaur is massive - both figuratively and literally. While adults weighed around 3,000 kilograms, the weight of a pick-up truck, juveniles were much leaner.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 04.12.2023
Brains of newborns aren’t underdeveloped compared to other primates
Contrary to current understanding, the brains of human newborns aren't significantly less developed compared to other primate species, but appear so because so much brain development happens after birth, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.
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