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Paleontology - 15.12.2023
Palaeontologist cleared of fabricating data in dino-killing asteroid paper
Investigations conducted by The University of Manchester find the allegations made by Melanie During, published in Science in December 2022, that Robert DePalma " wanted to claim credit for identifying the dinosaur-killing asteroid's season of impact and fabricated data in order to be able to publish a paper before she did " were unfounded.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 15.12.2023
Southampton features in prime time Sir David Attenborough documentary
Southampton features in prime time Sir David Attenborough documentary
Researchers from the University of Southampton are set to appear in a new BBC Natural History programme revealing the secrets of a giant pliosaur, a ferocious predator which inhabited our seas at the same time as dinosaurs roamed the Earth about 150 million years ago. The documentary, titled 'Attenborough and the Giant Sea Monster' (BBC One and iPlayer, 8pm, 1 January 2024), follows Sir David Attenborough on a journey of discovery as he explores the fascinating story of an enormous marine reptile whose skull was found buried on the Dorset coast near Kimmeridge Bay.

Paleontology - Environment - 11.12.2023
What's for dinner? Paleontologist finds out through remarkable specimen
What’s for dinner? Paleontologist finds out through remarkable specimen
1st-ever prey found inside fossilized juvenile tyrannosaur leads to deeper understanding about feeding habits of these iconic predators The difference between a juvenile and adult tyrannosaur is massive - both figuratively and literally. While adults weighed around 3,000 kilograms, the weight of a pick-up truck, juveniles were much leaner.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 04.12.2023
Brains of newborns aren’t underdeveloped compared to other primates
Contrary to current understanding, the brains of human newborns aren't significantly less developed compared to other primate species, but appear so because so much brain development happens after birth, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 30.11.2023
Floral Time Travel: Flowers Were More Diverse 100 Million Years Ago Than They Are Today
Floral Time Travel: Flowers Were More Diverse 100 Million Years Ago Than They Are Today
Angiosperm flowers reached their greatest morphological diversity early in their evolutionary history An international team of researchers around botanists at the University of Vienna, Austria, has now analyzed the morphological diversity of fossilized flowers and compared it with the diversity of living species.

Earth Sciences - Paleontology - 24.11.2023
More than a meteorite: The new clues about the demise of dinosaurs
McGill researchers challenge current understanding of dinosaur extinction by unearthing link between volcanic eruptions and climate change What wiped out the dinosaurs? A meteorite plummeting to Earth is only part of the story, a new study suggests. Climate change triggered by massive volcanic eruptions may have ultimately set the stage for the dinosaur extinction, challenging the traditional narrative that a meteorite alone delivered the final blow to the ancient giants.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 01.11.2023
How the fish got its shoulder
How the fish got its shoulder
A new analysis of the bones and muscles in ancient fish gives new clues about how the shoulder evolved in animals - including us. The shoulder girdle - the configuration of bones and muscles that in humans support the movement of the arms - is a classic example of an evolutionary 'novelty'. This is where a new anatomical feature appears without any obvious precursors; where there is no smoking gun of which feature clearly led to another.

Paleontology - Environment - 31.10.2023
Fine particulates signalled the end of the dinosaurs
Fine particulates signalled the end of the dinosaurs
Fine dust from pulverised rock released by the impact of the Chicxulub meteorite 66 million years ago played a major role in climate cooling, disruption of photosynthesis and the mass extinction of dinosaurs, VUB researchers have found. Until now, the exact circumstances surrounding the mass extinction of the dinosaurs - such as the effect on the global climate of the material ejected by the meteorite's impact - have been unclear.

Paleontology - Environment - 30.10.2023
Fine particles heralded the end of the dinosaurs
Fine particles heralded the end of the dinosaurs
Fine dust from pulverized rock released by the Chicxulub meteorite impact 66 million years ago played a dominant role in the cooling of the climate, the disruption of photosynthesis and the mass extinction in which most dinosaurs went extinct. Until now, the precise circumstances of the mass extinction, such as the effect of the different types of impact material ejected from the crater on global climate were unclear .

Innovation - Paleontology - 13.10.2023
Infant jawbone confirms the emergence of Homo erectus two million years ago
Research at the Ethiopian site of Garba IV, in the archaeological area of Melka Kunture, in which the Universidad Complutense de Madrid participates, constitutes one of the oldest fossils attributed to this species and is the one with the most diagnostic evidence . The bone remains, described in Science, appear together with lithic tools elaborated with Olduvayense technology, characterized by small-sized lithic tools, the first technology developed by mankind, which allows corroborating for the first time that Homo erectus used this technology .

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 20.09.2023
Proboscideans of the Hammerschmiede - contemporaries of the first upright ape
Proboscideans of the Hammerschmiede - contemporaries of the first upright ape
Today, there exist only three elephant species, in Africa and Asia. Yet the diversity of proboscidean species and their distribution was significantly greater in the Earth's past. Researchers from the University of Tübingen and the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment, working at the Hammerschmiede site in southern Germany, have now described new fossils of early proboscidean species.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 20.09.2023
Prehistoric fish fills 100 million year gap in evolution of the skull
Prehistoric fish fills 100 million year gap in evolution of the skull
X-rays of an ancient jawless fish shows earliest-known example of internal cartilage skull, unlike that of any other known vertebrate. A 455-million-year-old fossil fish provides a new perspective on how vertebrates evolved to protect their brains, a study has found. In a paper published in Nature today (Wednesday 20 September), researchers from the University of Birmingham, Naturalis Biodiversity Centre in Leiden, Netherlands; and the Natural History Museum have pieced together the skull of Eriptychius americanus.

Paleontology - 14.09.2023
Isle of Wight fossil shows Europe had different herbivorous dinosaurs to Asia and America
Isle of Wight fossil shows Europe had different herbivorous dinosaurs to Asia and America
Vectidromeus insularis was a herbivorous dinosaur belonging to the hypsilophodont family, and is only the second species in this family to be discovered. Published on Thursday 14 September 2023 Last updated on Thursday 14 September 2023 Scientists have discovered a new species of small plant-eating dinosaur on the Isle of Wight in southern England (UK).

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 01.09.2023
Fossil spines reveal deep sea's past
Fossil spines reveal deep sea’s past
Research team led by Göttingen University describe early occurrence of irregular sea urchins in the depths of the oceans Right at the bottom of the deep sea, the first very simple forms of life on earth probably emerged a long time ago. Today, the deep sea is known for its bizarre fauna. Intensive research is being conducted into how the number of species living on the sea floor have changed in the meantime.

Environment - Paleontology - 11.08.2023
Extreme cooling ended the first human occupation of Europe
Paleoclimate evidence shows that around 1.1 million years ago, the southern European climate cooled significantly and likely caused an extinction of early humans on the continent, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. Published in the journal Science , the team of researchers discovered the occurrence of previously unknown extreme glacial conditions around 1.1 million years ago.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 10.08.2023
Study undermines evolutionary rule
Study undermines evolutionary rule
According to Cope's rule, today's animal species are on average larger than older species of the same genus. A large-scale study led by a researcher at the University of Fribourg has just demonstrated that this is not the case in turtles . Paleontologists have noticed that, in the course of their evolution, certain species tend to get bigger and bigger.

Paleontology - Environment - 08.08.2023
Shell size: how turtles evolved over the last 200 million years Diversity of turtle body size studied
With a shell length of about 100 millimeters, the land-dwelling areolate flat-shelled turtle (Homopus areolatus) is one of today's smallest turtle species. The record at the other end of the scale is held by the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), which is common in tropical and subtropical seas and can reach up to two meters in length.

Paleontology - History / Archeology - 04.08.2023
Database with 2,400 prehistoric sites
Database with 2,400 prehistoric sites
Human history in one click: For the first time, numerous sites relating to the early history of mankind from 3 million to 20,000 years ago can be accessed in a large-scale database. Scientists from the research center ROCEEH ("The Role of Culture in Early Expansions of Humans") have compiled information on 2,400 prehistoric sites and 24,000 assemblages from more than 100 ancient cultures.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 20.07.2023
Coelacanths thrived in Switzerland after a mass extinction
Coelacanths thrived in Switzerland after a mass extinction
Fossils of coelacanth discovered in Ticino reveal the existence of an unexpected diversification after the greatest mass extinction in the history of life. The study of a new species of coelacanth from the Middle Triassic period, with a strange morphology for these fish known as "living fossil", show the formation of several species in a short time, after a mass extinction that occurred 252 million years ago, with more than 80% of marine species disappearing.

Paleontology - 13.07.2023
Chinese alligator had Asian relatives around 200,000 years ago
Chinese alligator had Asian relatives around 200,000 years ago
University of Tübingen paleontologists Dr. Márton Rabi and Gustavo Darlim, working with Chulalongkorn University and Department of Mineral Resources of Thailand, have demonstrated that an almost completely fossilized alligator skull found in Thailand belongs to a previously unknown species. The fossil was discovered in 2005 and is at most 230,000 years old.