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Paleontology - 04.07.2023
Revelation of the smallest singing cricket in a 100-million-year-old amber fragment from the Charentes region of France
Revelation of the smallest singing cricket in a 100-million-year-old amber fragment from the Charentes region of France
An international scientific team, notably from the Institut de Systématique Évolution et Biodiversité ( ISYEB ), has just identified the smallest species of singing cricket ever described, whether fossil or present-day, in opaque amber from the Cretaceous period (around 100 million years ago - Ma) in the Charentes region of France.

Paleontology - 03.07.2023
First evidence of monitor lizards in Switzerland
First evidence of monitor lizards in Switzerland
After a chance discovery in the collection's repository, a Basel researcher provides the first evidence of the existence of monitor lizards in Switzerland. While working in the vertebrate fossil collection at Basel's Natural History Museum, paleontologist Bastien Mennecart's eye was caught by two teeth of a large lizard.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 29.06.2023
Exciting insights into the sexual development of a marine reptile
Exciting insights into the sexual development of a marine reptile
International research team sheds light on puberty of extinct vertebrates some 240 million years ago Fossil skeletons have long fascinated researchers as a window to prehistory. But so far, little is known about details of sexual development in extinct creatures. An international team of researchers from China, Germany and Japan, with significant participation from the University of Bonn, reports on the puberty of Keichousaurus in the journal Current Biology.

Paleontology - 27.06.2023
'The legacy of the dinosaurs' features in the last issue of Mètode
’The legacy of the dinosaurs’ features in the last issue of Mètode
The 117th issue of the communication journal of the University of Valencia focuses on the paleontological research on these extinct animals. "Popular appreciation of these animals dates almost as far back as their scientific discovery in the mid-19th century", states paleontologist Luis Alcalá in the of Mètode 's new monograph.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 23.06.2023
New Oxford study sheds light on the origin of animals
A study led by the University of Oxford has brought us one step closer to solving a mystery that has puzzled naturalists since Charles Darwin: when did animals first appear in the history of Earth? The results have been published today in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution . Animals* first occur in the fossil record around 574 million years ago.

Environment - Paleontology - 22.06.2023
Ravens were attracted to humans' food more than 30,000 years ago
Ravens were attracted to humans’ food more than 30,000 years ago
Wild animals entered into diverse relationships with humans long before the first settlements were established in the Neolithic period around 10,000 years ago. An international study by researchers from the Universities of Tübingen, Helsinki and Aarhus presents new evidence that ravens helped themselves to people's scraps and picked over mammoth carcasses left by human hunters during the Pavlovian culture more than 30,000 years ago in what is now Moravia in the Czech Republic.

Paleontology - 16.06.2023
Fossil study sheds light on famous spirals found in nature
Fossil study sheds light on famous spirals found in nature
A 3D model of a 407-million-year-old plant fossil has overturned thinking on the evolution of leaves / "Science" publication A 3D model of a 407-million-year-old plant fossil has overturned thinking on the evolution of leaves. The research has also led to fresh insights about spectacular patterns found in plants.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 13.06.2023
Dynamic plants: Origin and geographic evolution of cycads clarified
Dynamic plants: Origin and geographic evolution of cycads clarified
Distribution in the Mesozoic from present-day Antarctica to Greenland Paleobotanist Mario Coiro of the Institute of Paleontology at the University of Vienna and colleagues at the University of Montpellier (France) have made an important breakthrough in understanding the origin and geographic distribution of cycads.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 05.06.2023
Archaeologists uncover evidence of intentional burial, cave engravings by early human ancestor
Archaeologists uncover evidence of intentional burial, cave engravings by early human ancestor
New observations and excavations in South African caves have found that  Homo naledi , an early human ancestor, intentionally buried their dead and made crosshatch engravings in the cave walls nearby. Fossils of  Homo naledi  were first discovered in these caves 10 years ago by a team of researchers led by paleoanthropologist  Lee Berger , now a National Geographic Explorer in Residence, with key participation by John Hawks of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and other UW-Madison researchers.

Paleontology - 01.06.2023
Multiple species of semi-aquatic dinosaur may have roamed pre-historic Britain
Multiple species of semi-aquatic dinosaur may have roamed pre-historic Britain
Palaeontologists at the University of Southampton studying a British dinosaur tooth have concluded that several distinct groups of spinosaurs - dinosaurs with fearsome crocodile-like skulls - inhabited southern England over 100 million years ago. The team, from the University's EvoPalaeoLab, carried out a series of tests on the 140 million year old tooth, discovered in the early 20th century, in a thick, complicated rock structure named the Wealden Supergroup.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 17.05.2023
A new understanding of human origins in Africa
Contemporary DNA evidence suggests that humans emerged from the interaction of multiple populations living across the continent There is broad agreement that Homo sapiens originated in Africa. But there remain many uncertainties and competing theories about where, when, and how.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 17.05.2023
Fossil of mosasaur with bizarre 'screwdriver teeth' found in Morocco
Fossil of mosasaur with bizarre ’screwdriver teeth’ found in Morocco
Scientists have discovered a new species of rare mosasaur in Morocco, adding to evidence of the vast diversity of these marine reptiles 66 million years ago. Scientists have discovered a new species of mosasaur, a sea-dwelling lizard from the age of the dinosaurs, with strange, ridged teeth unlike those of any known reptile.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 11.05.2023
Study on the evolution of Brontotheres lead by UV palaeontologist Óscar Sanisidro published in the journal ’Science’
Study on the evolution of Brontotheres lead by UV palaeontologist Éscar Sanisidro published in the journal -Science- Palaeontology specialists lead by University of Valencia investigator Éscar Sanisidro publish a study in the -Science- journal on the body size of Brontotheres, a mammal family that went extinct 53 million years ago.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 11.05.2023
300,000-Year-Old Snapshot: Oldest Human Footprints from Germany Found
300,000-Year-Old Snapshot: Oldest Human Footprints from Germany Found
Schöningen/Tübingen, 05/12/2023. In a study published today in the journal Quaternary Science Reviews, an international research team led by scientists from the University of Tübingen and the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment presents the earliest human footprints known from Germany.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 20.04.2023
Aussie prehistoric predator's last meal revealed
Aussie prehistoric predator’s last meal revealed
We now know more about the diet of a prehistoric creature that grew up to two and a half metres long and lived in Australian waters during the time of the dinosaurs, thanks to the power of X-rays and a team of scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) and the Australian Museum Research Institute (AMRI).

Environment - Paleontology - 13.04.2023
Africa’s grassy habitats emerged 10+ million years earlier than previously thought
A pair of studies to be published April 15 in the journal Science paint a new picture about apes, ancient Africa and the origins of humans. Many scientists had once hypothesized that the first apes to evolve in Africa more than 20 million years ago ate primarily fruit and lived within the thick, closed canopy of a nearly continent-wide forest ecosystem.

Environment - Paleontology - 13.04.2023
Apes may have evolved upright stature for leaves, not fruit, in open woodland habitats
Pair of studies pushes back ape origins and grassy woodland evolution by 10 million years in Africa Anthropologists have long thought that our ape ancestors evolved an upright torso in order to pick fruit in forests, but new research from the University of Michigan suggests a life in open woodlands and a diet that included leaves drove apes' upright stature.

Paleontology - Environment - 12.04.2023
SFU professor unearths the ancient fossil plant history of Burnaby Mountain
New research led by SFU paleobotanist Rolf Mathewes provides clues about what plants existed in the Burnaby Mountain area 40 million years ago during the late Eocene, when the climate was much warmer than it is today. The results of their plant fossil analysis were recently published in the International Journal of Plant Sciences.

Environment - Paleontology - 28.03.2023
80 million years old rainforest
Plant fossils from Egypt shed light on the evolutionary history of rainforests An international team of researchers led by first author Dr. Clément Coiffard of Freie Universität Berlin and Senckenberg scientist Dieter Uhl has taken a close look at the evolutionary history of tropical rainforests.

Paleontology - Environment - 14.03.2023
Dwarf and giant species are most at risk of extinction
Dwarf and giant species are most at risk of extinction
Islands are biodiversity hotspots and are home to animal species with unique characteristics, including dwarf specimens, which have evolved to very small sizes compared to their mainland relatives, and giants. An international study now reports that these species are at higher risk of extinction. The findings are supported by software developed by Daniele Silvestro of the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) at the University of Fribourg.