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Psychology - Pedagogy - 07.05.2021
Supporting mums' mental health strengthens 'protective' playmate role with children
Supporting mums’ mental health strengthens ’protective’ playmate role with children
Helping parents with depression or anxiety could also improve their ability to engage in potentially 'protective' forms of play with their children that can reduce the risk of behavioural problems, new research suggests. If there are two mothers who pretend play with the same frequency, but one has higher anxiety or depression level, the child of that parent will tend to engage in less pretend play Zhen Rao The finding comes from a granular analysis of 3,600 five-second clips, which researchers took from recordings of 60 mother-toddler pairs playing together.

Health - Pedagogy - 28.04.2021
New research plans confirmed on Bristol health study’s 30th birthday
Thirty years after it first started, the Children of the 90s health study - one of the largest, most detailed longitudinal birth cohorts in the world - announced today [28 April] that it will launch its biggest collection of health data yet on three generations of Bristol families in September. Children of the 90s data has been used in over 2,200 health studies around the world to date.

Pedagogy - 23.04.2021
Knowledge Alone Is Not Enough: New study shows that the educational study PISA could be more than just a way of ranking countries
Researchers from Freie Universität Berlin, the Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, and Boston College offer a new perspective on results from large-scale educational assessments and a more meaningful way of comparing outcomes No 067/2021 from Apr 23, 2021 Professor Steffi Pohl, a researcher at Freie Universität Berlin, is part of an international team taking an in-depth look at large-scale educational assessments such as PISA ("Programme for International Student Assessment").

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 22.04.2021
Cultivating 'multilingual identities' in schools could help reverse national crisis in language-learning
Cultivating ’multilingual identities’ in schools could help reverse national crisis in language-learning
More young people may choose to study foreign languages to GCSE if they are encouraged to 'identify' with languages at school, rather than just learning vocabulary and grammar, new research suggests.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 22.04.2021
Connecting the Dots Between Engagement and Learning
Carnegie Mellon University April 22, 2021 The adage goes, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again." But new research from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh finds that it isn't all about repetition. Rather, internal states like engagement can also have an impact on learning.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 31.03.2021
More support needed for two children in every class with hidden language disorder
Research from Bath psychologists suggests schools could introduce quieter alternatives to playtime to help children with Developmental Language Disorder. Last updated on Wednesday 31 March 2021 Children with a common but regularly undiagnosed disorder affecting their language and communication are likely to be finding the transition back to school post-lockdown harder than most, according to a team of psychologists.

Pedagogy - 26.03.2021
Global evidence for how EdTech can support pupils with disabilities is ’thinly spread’, report finds
An "astonishing" deficit of data about how the global boom in educational technology could help pupils with disabilities in low and middle-income countries has been highlighted in a new report.

Pedagogy - 26.03.2021
Global evidence for how EdTech can support pupils with disabilities is ’thinly spread’
An 'astonishing' deficit of data about how the global boom in educational technology could help pupils with disabilities in low and middle-income countries has been highlighted in a. Despite widespread optimism that educational technology, or 'EdTech', can help to level the playing field for young people with disabilities, the study found a significant shortage of evidence about which innovations are best-positioned to help which children, and why; specifically in low-income contexts.

Pedagogy - 23.03.2021
Babies prefer baby talk, whether they’re learning one language or two
It can be hard to resist lapsing into an exaggerated, singsong tone when you talk to a cute baby. And that's with good reason. Babies will pay more attention to baby talk than regular speech, regardless of which languages they're used to hearing, according to a study by UCLA's Language Acquisition Lab and 16 other labs around the globe.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 22.03.2021
The gender equalization process in Spain led to unexpected effects on the health of new-borns
The gender equalization process in Spain led to unexpected effects on the health of new-borns, according to research A study involving researchers from Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Mannheim and Carlos III of Madrid universities analyses the effect of increased access by women to education and financial opportunities caused to their fertility and the health of new-borns.

Pedagogy - 10.03.2021
Being born small doesn’t tend to disadvantage IVF babies’ cognitive development
Children conceived through medically assisted reproduction who are born small do just as well in cognitive tests during childhood and adolescence as naturally conceived children who are born a normal weight, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 02.03.2021
Parents depressed by pandemic had negative impact on kids’ education, well-being
Parent depression and stress early in the pandemic negatively contributed to young children's home education and anxiety, a University of Michigan study suggests. The stress could still be present today for some parents as their kids transition back to school while COVID-19 remains a danger. Continued support for children and parents will be needed, researchers said.

Innovation - Pedagogy - 26.02.2021
A Kazakh experiment in handwriting
A Kazakh experiment in handwriting
New EPFL research on whether handwriting skills transfer when a child writes in two different alphabetic scripts may pave the way for cross-lingual digital tools for the detection of handwriting difficulties. Despite the increasing digitization of education and the use of use of tablets and laptops in schools, handwriting has maintained its central position in learning as the basis of many core educational activities such as taking notes, composing stories and self-expression.

Health - Pedagogy - 10.02.2021
Wider lockdown key to preventing Covid-19 surge if schools reopen
Wider restrictions must remain in place if schools reopen in March in order to keep the epidemic's R number below 1 in the UK, a new UCL-led modelling study suggests. The pre-print study, published on the site medRxiv, suggested that reopening schools to all pupils in some form on March 8 may lead to an increase in cases but that, if a broader lockdown remained, it was unlikely to cause the R rate to go above 1 and lead to the epidemic growing again.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 03.02.2021
Teaching pupils empathy measurably improves their creative abilities
Teaching pupils empathy measurably improves their creative abilities
Teaching children in a way that encourages them to empathise with others measurably improves their creativity, and could potentially lead to several other beneficial learning outcomes, new research suggests. We clearly awakened something in these pupils by encouraging them to think about the thoughts and feelings of others Helen Demetriou The findings are from a year-long University of Cambridge study with Design and Technology (D&T) year 9 pupils (ages 13 to 14) at two inner London schools.

Pedagogy - 01.02.2021
Parental control apps behaving badly
Parental control apps behaving badly
Researchers from EPFL and Spain's IMDEA Software Institute and IMDEA Networks Institute , have found that many parental control applications collect and share data without consent, and fail to comply with regulatory requirements.

Pedagogy - 12.01.2021
Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family courts are misunderstanding and misusing research around how children form close relationships with their caregivers, say an international group of experts. The decisions reached by family courts can have a major impact on a child's life, but as we've seen, these decisions may be based on incorrect understanding and assumptions Robbie Duschinsky Seventy experts from across the globe argue that widespread misunderstandings around attachment research have hampered its accurate implementation, with potentially negative consequences for decisions in family courts.

Pedagogy - 08.12.2020
Pupils can learn more effectively through stories than activities
Storytelling is the most effective way of teaching school children about evolution, say researchers at the Milner Centre for Evolution. Last updated on Tuesday 8 December 2020 A randomised controlled trial found that children learn about evolution more effectively when engaged through stories read by the teacher, than through doing tasks to demonstrate the same concept.

Campus - Pedagogy - 02.12.2020
Parents shouldn’t worry about their baby’s inconsistent sleep patterns
New parents often expect their baby to start sleeping through the night around the time they reach six months of age. But according to a new study led by Professor Marie-Hélène Pennestri, parents should view sleep consolidation as a process, instead of a milestone to be achieved at a specific age. Tracking 44 infants over a period of two weeks, she found that sleeping patterns vary greatly - not only for different babies, but also night to night for the same baby.

Pedagogy - Mathematics - 27.11.2020
Storybooks could help children’s maths
Tutoring programmes and storybooks can help improve children's attainment in maths, according to a new evidence review led by UCL researchers. The evidence review, published today by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) and written by a team from the UCL Institute of Education, the University of Brighton, Loughborough University and Ulster University, synthesises the best international evidence about the teaching and learning mathematics for children in Early Years and Key Stage 1 (between the ages of 3 and 7).
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