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Pedagogy - Career - 17.07.2014
Women’s professional self-identity impacts on childcare balance, but not men’s
Research shows that a mother's self-identity impacts on the amount of time her partner spends on childcare - with strong professional identity in women creating a more equal childcare balance in a couple. A father's self-identity, however, has no bearing on a mother's time with children.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 01.07.2014
Families can play key role against bullying
A University of Queensland study has shown that families can be more effective in protecting children from bullying than school-based strategies alone. The findings, to be published in the journal Behavior Therapy , show that parents can actively help their children reduce the impact of bullying. The results of a randomised control trial of , a family-based variant of UQ's Triple P - Positive Parenting Program, show the program is more effective than efforts of school staff to address concerns about a particular child.

Pedagogy - 19.06.2014
Early reading progress in English primary schools surpasses international counterparts
Early reading progress in English primary schools surpasses international counterparts
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue. Early reading progress in English primary schools surpasses international counterparts Children in their first year of primary school in England make more progress in reading than those in Scotland, New Zealand and two parts of Australia, according to new research.

Pedagogy - 02.06.2014
Parents see sibling fighting as normal
Parents see sibling fighting as normal
Three out of four Australian parents are concerned about their children fighting yet claim their kids get along well, a University of Queensland study has found. Research by UQ's Parenting and Family Support Centre also found that parents view smacking as the least acceptable method to deal with children fighting.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 26.05.2014
For a better sex life, try a little tenderness
Want a more satisfying sex life and a better relationship with your partner? More post-sex cuddling will do the trick, especially for couples who are parents, according to new research from the University of Toronto Mississauga. UTM sexuality and relationship researcher Amy Muise studied the effects of after-sex behavior in monogamous romantic relationships.

Pedagogy - Health - 01.05.2014
Children’s TV time is closely linked to parents’ viewing habits
The amount of time children spend in front of TV, phone and computer screens is closely associated with their parents' own habits, with much higher weekend viewing than during the week, a new study by the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol has found. Researchers at the University of Bristol analysed the amount of time children aged five and six spent watching television, playing video games and using computers, tablets and smartphones - activities associated with a range of health problems, including obesity.

Pedagogy - Health - 01.05.2014
Children’s TV time is closely linked to parents’ viewing habits
Press release issued: 1 May 2014 The amount of time children spend in front of TV, phone and computer screens is closely associated with their parents' own habits, with much higher weekend viewing than during the week, a new study has found. Researchers at the University of Bristol analysed the amount of time children aged five and six spent watching television, playing video games and using computers, tablets and smartphones - activities associated with a range of health problems, including obesity.

Pedagogy - 10.03.2014
Time out: Spanking babies is surprisingly common
ANN ARBOR-The same hands that parents use to lovingly feed, clothe and bathe their babies are also commonly used to spank their bundles of joy. A new University of Michigan study found that 30 percent of 1-year-old children were spanked at least once in the past month by their mother, father or both parents.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 16.02.2014
Racial/ethnic disparities in ADHD diagnosis
UNIVERSITY PARK - A study by Paul Morgan, associate professor of special education, and his colleagues Marianne Hillemeier, George Farkas and Steve Maczuga indicates that black children and children in homes where a language other than English is being spoken are less likely to receive an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis by school entry, despite being otherwise similar to white children on many measured background characteristics.

Pedagogy - Health - 16.02.2014
Racial and ethnic disparities in ADHD diagnosis
UNIVERSITY PARK - Black children and children in homes where a language other than English is spoken are less likely to receive an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis by school entry, despite being otherwise similar to white children on many measured background characteristics, according to a study by a team of researchers.

Pedagogy - 14.02.2014
Passive smoking impairs children's responses to asthma treatment
Passive smoking impairs children’s responses to asthma treatment
Children exposed to cigarette smoke at home have lower levels of an enzyme that helps them respond to asthma treatment, a study has found. Passive smoking is known to worsen asthma symptoms in children and impair their response to inhaled steroid treatment, but how this effect occurs was not known. Researchers at Imperial College London found that children with severe asthma with a parent who smokes at home have lower levels of the enzyme HDAC2 compared with those whose parents don't smoke.

Pedagogy - 13.02.2014
Stanford psychologist shows why talking to kids really matters
Exposure to child-directed speech sharpens infants' language processing skills and can predict future success. New work indicates early intervention can improve language skills in kids lagging behind. Fifty years of research has revealed the sad truth that the children of lower-income, less-educated parents typically enter school with poorer language skills than their more privileged counterparts.

Health - Pedagogy - 07.02.2014
Power lines don't raise risk of leukaemia in children
Children who live near overhead power lines in early life do not have a greater risk of developing childhood leukaemia, researchers from the Childhood Cancer Research Group at the University of Oxford have found. Their study in the British Journal of Cancer found no increased risk of leukaemia in children born since the 1990s whose mother lived within a kilometre of overhead power lines.

Pedagogy - Administration - 22.01.2014
Early years learning needs a sound foundation
New research by Oxford University concludes that clear developmental benefits for the poorest children require good quality provision which is not yet available for all 92,000 two year-olds taking up nursery places at the moment. Sandra Mathers, Kathy Sylva and Naomi Eisenstadt, from the University's Department of Education, conclude that current levels of quality may not be adequate to deliver an expansion of free nursery places as planned by the government.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 06.01.2014
Babbling babies - responding to one-on-one ‘baby talk’ - master more words
University of Washington Common advice to new parents is that the more words babies hear the faster their vocabulary grows. Now new findings show that what spurs early language development isn't so much the quantity of words as the style of speech and social context in which speech occurs. Researchers at the University of Washington and University of Connecticut examined thousands of 30-second snippets of verbal exchanges between parents and babies.

Art and Design - Pedagogy - 11.12.2013
Muting the Mozart effect
Muting the Mozart effect Contrary to popular opinion, research finds no cognitive benefits to musical training C hildren get plenty of benefits from music lessons. Learning to play instruments can fuel their creativity, and practicing can teach much-needed focus and discipline. And the payoff, whether in learning a new song or just mastering a chord, often boosts self-esteem.

Continuing Education - Pedagogy - 13.11.2013
For 2-year-olds, touch screens may trump TV
New research shows that for children under 2 1/2 years old, interactive screens such as those on smartphones and tablet computers may be better teaching tools than educational television. Photo: iStock Photo Smartphones and tablets may be better learning tools for toddlers younger than 2 1/2 years old than "Sesame Street" and other educational TV programs, according to a researcher in the UW-Madison School of Human Ecology.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 04.11.2013
Teenagers attacking parents: new study maps 'hidden problem'
Teenagers attacking parents: new study maps 'hidden problem'
Oxford University researchers have conducted the first academic study into the hidden problem of adolescent to parent violence in the UK. Adolescent to parent violence is not a category currently flagged in police databases. Researchers analysed raw data from the London Metropolitan Police area, revealing that in one year (2009-2010) alone, there were 1,892 reported cases of 13-19-year-olds committing violent assaults against their own parents or other carers.

Health - Pedagogy - 04.11.2013
Study suggests clinicians' decision making could be affected by 'precious baby' phenomenon
Parents who conceive through assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are likely to receive different medical advice in relation to prenatal testing than those who conceive naturally, academics have suggested. An international study has revealed that almost 45% of clinicians would recommend a 37-year-old mother undergo amniocentesis – an invasive test which screens for Down’s syndrome – if she had conceived naturally.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 14.10.2013
Talking to toddlers boosts their language skills, Stanford study shows
New research from Stanford psychologists reveals that the amount parents speak directly to their toddler can make an incredible difference in the child's language proficiency and vocabulary. Just as young children need nourishing food to build physical strength, they also need linguistic nutrition for optimal development of language and cognitive abilities.
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