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Health - Pharmacology - 22.04.2019
Identifies why some colds cause asthma attacks in children
Upper respiratory infections remain one of the most common triggers of asthma attacks in children, but not every cold leads to a dangerous worsening of symptoms, even among children with severe asthma. The reasons for this have mostly gone unanswered for decades, but a new study led by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health provides some insight on what differentiates a cold that leads to an asthma attack from a cold that remains a cold.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.04.2019
Innovative drug delivery improves effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy
Even after decades of research, cancer remains difficult to treat, in part because of its ability to evade the body's natural defenses found in the immune system. Immunotherapy, which stimulates the body's immune system to find and attack cancer and other diseases, has offered a new avenue for treatment.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.04.2019
When psychiatric medications are abruptly discontinued, withdrawal symptoms may be mistaken for relapse
Withdrawal symptoms following the practice of discontinuation, or abruptly “coming off,” of psychiatric drugs in randomized clinical trials may be mistaken for relapse and bolster the case for continued use of medication, according to two new studies by UCLA researchers published in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 16.04.2019
New drug mimics benefits of ketamine for depression
A new small-molecule drug produced a rapid antidepressant response similar to that of ketamine when tested in mice, a new Yale-led study published April 16 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation shows. The effects of the drug, called NV-5138, in rodent models mimicked the rapid actions of the anesthetic ketamine, a variation of which, Esketamine, was recently approved by the FDA for use in depressed patients who do not respond to other medications.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.04.2019
Statins fail to lower cholesterol in over half of all patients
Experts have warned a more tailored approach is needed to the prescribing of statins, following a new study suggesting they are ineffective at lowering cholesterol to target levels in more than half of patients. The research by primary care experts at The University of Nottingham, which is published in Heart , found that 51.2 per cent of patients prescribed statins saw little benefit to their cholesterol levels within two years, leading to a significant risk of developing cardiovascular disease in the future.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.04.2019
Precise Decoding of Breast Cancer Cells Creates New Option for Treatment
Researchers at the University of Zurich and from IBM Research have investigated the varying composition of cancer and immune cells in over one hundred breast tumors. They've found that aggressive tumors are often dominated by a single type of tumor cell. If certain immune cells are present as well, an immune therapy could be successful for a specific group of breast cancer patients.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 15.04.2019
Novel approach promises ready access to hard-to-study proteins
DNA and the genome, we know, provide the blueprint for life. But it is the proteins made according to the genome's instructions that are the nuts and bolts of living organisms, providing the molecular building blocks for all cells and that are critical targets for therapy. There are many different kinds of proteins that make up the human body and they are widely studied.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.04.2019
Malaria and the doctor who changed the rules of treatment
Malaria and the doctor who changed the rules of treatment
The people of Burma, now Myanmar, were being devastated by conflict and drug resistant malaria, when alumna Rose McGready arrived. It was a temporary work placement that became much more than she expected. When Professor Rose McGready (MBBS '90) arrived on the Thai/Myanmar border in 1994, it had been a volatile and dangerous part of the world for many years.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.04.2019
Bristol part of ¤20.8M study to drive drug discovery for atopic dermatitis and psoriasis
Bristol part of ¤20.8M study to drive drug discovery for atopic dermatitis and psoriasis
The lives of patients affected by atopic dermatitis and psoriasis could be improved thanks to the start of an EU-funded research project BIOMAP (Biomarkers in Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis). The five-year project will address key unmet needs in treating these common inflammatory skin conditions by analysing data from more than 50 000 patients to improve disease understanding, patient care and future therapies.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.04.2019
The way people walk says a lot about how healthy they are
The way people walk says a lot about how healthy they are
Gait characteristics are sometimes regarded as the sixth vital sign in humans. They serve as a valuable indicator of a person's health, particularly in older adults - so why not measure them? A team of EPFL researchers is taking part in a major European project to design a device that can assess a person's gait more accurately.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 10.04.2019
Active lifestyles may help nerves to heal after spinal injuries
Active lifestyles may help nerves to heal after spinal injuries
Leading an active lifestyle may increase the likelihood of damaged nerves regenerating after a spinal cord injury. The early-stage findings , published in the journal Science Translational Medicine , come from studies in mice and rats with spinal cord injuries, in which scientists uncovered a mechanism for nerve fibres repairing after they had been damaged.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.04.2019
Antibiotic resistance across Wisconsin revealed by new maps
When a patient arrives at a hospital with an infection, her doctor must decide which antibiotic might have the best chance of curing her - no easy feat when disease-causing pathogens are increasingly resistant to multiple antibiotics. For that reason, hospitals often track the antibiotic resistance profiles of infectious microbes that they isolate from sick patients, which provide information on the most and least effective drugs.

Pharmacology - Health - 05.04.2019
New target for development of drugs to fight viruses
Researchers at Cardiff University have discovered that a molecule responsible for guiding virus-killing T-cells to the site of infection is also responsible for rapidly increasing T-cell numbers to fight infection, making it an important new target for the development of more effective drugs to treat both viruses and cancers.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 04.04.2019
Scientists fine-tune signalling pathways to tweak responses to stimuli in yeast
Scientists fine-tune signalling pathways to tweak responses to stimuli in yeast
Imperial academics have streamlined a signalling pathway in yeast to understand how cell sensing can be tuned by changing protein levels. The research , published in Cell , could eventually help us understand drug side effects in humans, and has immediate implications for biotechnology research. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are proteins which let cells detect chemical substances like hormones, poisons, and drugs in their environment.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 04.04.2019
How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?
How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?
Muscles are connected to tendons to power animal movements such as running, swimming or flying. Forces are produced by contractile chains of the proteins actin and myosin, which are pulling on muscle-tendon connections called attachments. During animal development, these muscle-tendon attachments must be established such that they resist high mechanical forces for the entire life of the animal.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.03.2019
Breast cancer: the promises of old recipes
Breast cancer: the promises of old recipes
Researchers from UNIGE and UNIL demonstrate the efficacy of a well-known antibiotic in treating a particularly fatal form of breast cancer, offering hope for targeted therapy. Of the three major subtypes of breast cancer, the «triple negative» is the most lethal: half of all breast cancer deaths are attributed to it, whereas it accounts for only about 15% of incidences of breast cancer.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.03.2019
Heating up tumors could make CAR’T therapy more effective
FINDINGS A preclinical study led by scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center suggests that heating solid tumors during CAR T-cell therapy can enhance the treatment's success. The researchers found that when a heating technique called photothermal ablation was combined with the infusion of CAR T cells, it suppressed melanoma tumor growth for up to 20 days in mice.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 26.03.2019
New 'pulsing' ultrasound technique improves drug delivery to brains of mice
New ’pulsing’ ultrasound technique improves drug delivery to brains of mice
Using rapid short-pulse sequences of ultrasound helps drugs reach the brains of mice, according to new Imperial College London research. Scientists currently use long-wave pulses of ultrasound to deliver drugs, which can cause side effects. Now, these new findings from Imperial on shorter-wave pulses could change how drugs are used to help patients of Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 22.03.2019
How new ketamine drug helps with depression
On March 5, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first truly new medication for major depression in decades. The drug is a nasal spray called esketamine, derived from ketamine-an anesthetic that has made waves for its surprising antidepressant effect.   Because treatment with esketamine might be so helpful to patients with treatment-resistant depression (meaning standard treatments had not helped them), the FDA expedited the approval process to make it more quickly available.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 22.03.2019
Inert Nitrogen Forced to React with Itself
Inert Nitrogen Forced to React with Itself
03/22/2019 Direct coupling of two molecules of nitrogen: chemists from Würzburg and Frankfurt have achieved what was thought to be impossible. This new reaction is reported and opens new possibilities for one of the most inert molecules on earth. Constituting over 78 % of the air we breathe, nitrogen is the element found the most often in its pure form on earth.
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