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Health - Pharmacology - 14:02
Combination vaccines against Covid-19 tested
Immune response stronger than after two doses of AstraZeneca vaccine People under the age of 60 who initially received a vaccine from AstraZeneca should be given an mRNA vaccine at their second appointment. This is recommended by the German Standing Committee on Vaccination. However, up until now, there were no data available to indicate to what extent the human organism would react to such a combined vaccination and start to form antibodies.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.07.2021
Scientists use tiny bubbles to help treat common childhood cancer
Scientists use tiny bubbles to help treat common childhood cancer
Researchers at UCL have developed a new way to deliver drugs that can shut down cancer-promoting mutations in neuroblastoma. The findings in mice, show the method, which uses tiny bubbles to deliver therapies directly to tumour cells, reduced tumour growth and improved survival. Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumour found in children and accounts for about 15% of all cancer-related deaths in children.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.07.2021
Helping new mums sleep better without medication
Helping new mums sleep better without medication
Importantly, the study found that in women who suffer from insomnia symptoms during pregnancy, the benefits of CBT in enhancing the quality of their sleep lasted throughout the first two years post-birth. The study, led by Dr Bei Bei , from Monash University's Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, and published today in the journal, Psychological Medicine, suggests that CBT for better sleep should become a part of routine perinatal care.

Pharmacology - Health - 27.07.2021
Model can predict how drug interactions influence antibiotic resistance
Model can predict how drug interactions influence antibiotic resistance
Scientists have proposed a modeling framework which could predict how antibiotic resistance will evolve in response to different treatment combinations, according to a study published in eLife. The research, co-led by University of Michigan biophysicist Kevin Wood , could help doctors optimize the choice, timing, dose and sequence of antibiotics used to treat common infections, helping to halt the growing threat of antibiotic resistance to modern medicine.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.07.2021
More sensitive kidney disease test reveals cancer risk link
Using a more sensitive test than is commonly used in the NHS, researchers have been able to show, for the first time, that even mild kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of developing and dying from cancer. The new research, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in the journal EClinicalMedicine, shows that the more sensitive 'cystatin C' test was able to identify a heightened risk of developing and dying from cancer in people with chronic kidney disease.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.07.2021
Increasing the accuracy of early ovarian cancer detection
A test being developed in Queensland could help to reduce the high mortality rate from ovarian cancer by dramatically improving the accuracy of early detection. University of Queensland researchers said the test had successfully detected more than 90 per cent of early ovarian cancer compared to 50 per cent for existing methods.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.07.2021
Longer interval between the first and second Pfizer vaccine boosts antibody levels and ’helper’ T cells
A new study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham shows both short and long dosing schedules of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine generate strong antibody and T cell immune responses. The study, led by the University of Oxford, in collaboration with the Universities of Birmingham, Newcastle, Liverpool, Sheffield, and supported by the UK Coronavirus Immunology Consortium, is one of the most comprehensive studies into the immune response generated by the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to date.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.07.2021
New dietary treatment for epilepsy well tolerated and reduced seizures
New dietary treatment for epilepsy well tolerated and reduced seizures
The first clinical trial of a new dietary treatment for children and adults with severe forms of epilepsy, co-developed by UCL researchers and based on the ketogenic diet, has been successfully completed.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.07.2021
Study highlights ’vital 30-day window’ for hospital inpatients to get COVID-19 jab
A new study published today has highlighted a "30-day window" for hospital inpatients to be vaccinated against COVID-19 to help reduce their risk of dying. A Cardiff University-led team analysed 2,508 hospital patients across 18 sites during the first wave of the pandemic to assess the impact of being infected with COVID-19 in hospital on risk of death.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.07.2021
Important factor in transplant rejection identified
KU Leuven researchers have revealed the importance of a newly identified mechanism of kidney transplant rejection. These results could increase the chances of a successful transplantation in the future. Each year, about 500 people in our country undergo a kidney transplant. 15 to 20% of these patients experience rejection symptoms.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.07.2021
Existing drug mastinib is shown to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 virus
Mastinib, not yet approved for use in humans, shows good results in early UChicago studies A new University of Chicago study has found that the drug masitinib may be effective in treating COVID-19. Mastinib has undergone several clinical trials for human conditions, but has not yet received approval to treat humans.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.07.2021
Llama 'nanobodies' could hold key to preventing deadly post-transplant infection
Llama ’nanobodies’ could hold key to preventing deadly post-transplant infection
Scientists have developed a 'nanobody' - a small fragment of a llama antibody - that is capable of chasing out human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as it hides away from the immune system. This then enables immune cells to seek out and destroy this potentially deadly virus. Our team has shown that nanobodies derived from llamas have the potential to outwit human cytomegalovirus Ian Groves Around four out of five people in the UK are thought to be infected with HCMV, and in developing countries this can be as high as 95%.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.07.2021
Antibiotics may help to treat melanoma
Antibiotics may help to treat melanoma
Some antibiotics appear to be effective against a form of skin cancer known as melanoma. KU Leuven researchers examined the effect of these antibiotics on patient-derived tumours in mice. Some antibiotics appear to be effective against a form of skin cancer known as melanoma. KU Leuven researchers examined the effect of these antibiotics on patient-derived tumours in mice.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.07.2021
'An entourage effect': new clues on how low-dose CBD products work
’An entourage effect’: new clues on how low-dose CBD products work
Research from the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics shows that hemp extracts deliver high concentrations of cannabinoid acids in mice due to a 'pharmacokinetic entourage' mechanism. Pharmacologists at the University of Sydney have found tantalising clues as to why low-dose CBD products containing a full-spectrum of cannabinoids seem to have therapeutic impacts at relatively low doses.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.07.2021
Clinical trial of Alzheimer’s drug developed at UCL begins
A clinical trial of a new drug candidate for Alzheimer's disease which has been developed at UCL in partnership with the pharmaceutical company Eisai has begun at UCLH with participants now being screened. Participants in the trial, conducted at the UCLH Leonard Wolfson Experimental Neurology Centre (NIHR UCLH Clinical Research Facility), will have the rare inherited form of Alzheimer's disease.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 21.07.2021
Toxicity testing on the placenta and embryo
Toxicity testing on the placenta and embryo
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a cell culture test to detect substances that are directly or indirectly harmful to embryos. Based on an existing test used for developing new drugs and chemicals, the augmented version is designed to help reduce the number of animal experiments. Drugs must be safe not just for the patients; in the case of pregnant patients, drugs must also be safe for the unborn children still in the womb.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.07.2021
Biological 'fingerprints' of long COVID in blood could lead to diagnostic test, say Cambridge scientists
Biological ’fingerprints’ of long COVID in blood could lead to diagnostic test, say Cambridge scientists
Markers in our blood - 'fingerprints' of infection - could help identify individuals who have been infected by SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, several months after infection even if the individual had only mild symptoms or showed no symptoms at all, say Cambridge researchers. Because we currently have no reliable way of diagnosing long COVID, the uncertainty can cause added stress to people who are experiencing potential symptoms.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.07.2021
Study highlights more effective and safe way to deliver chemotherapy
A new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in The Lancet, has compared the three main ways anticancer treatment is given to patients when administered via a central vein. Hickman-type tunnelled catheters (Hickman), peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), and totally implanted ports (PORTs) are used to deliver systemic anticancer treatment (SACT) via a central vein.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.07.2021
When insurers and doctors haggle over Medicaid costs, patients pay the price
Reimbursement negotiations can exacerbate health care disparities, new study finds When physicians and insurers haggle over reimbursement payments, health care providers lose revenue due to extra administrative burdens-an issue that is particularly acute with Medicaid, a key part of the social safety net that serves many low-income families.

Economics / Business - Pharmacology - 15.07.2021
When insurance companies haggle over Medicaid costs, patients pay the price
Reimbursement negotiations can exacerbate health care disparities, new study finds When physicians and insurers haggle over reimbursement payments, health care providers lose revenue due to extra administrative burdens-an issue that is particularly acute with Medicaid, a key part of the social safety net that serves many low-income families.
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