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Pharmacology



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Health - Pharmacology - 07.12.2018
Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives
Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives
Improving adherence to cholesterol-lowering treatments reduces cardiovascular risk for at risk patients. Thousands of heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease could be prevented by patients taking higher doses of statins and taking the drugs as advised by doctors.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.12.2018
Statins Overprescribed for Primary Prevention
Taking cholesterol-lowering drugs, or statins, as a preventive measure can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. A study by the University of Zurich now shows that this measure is recommended too often, as current guidelines fail to take into account the risks of side effects. Even healthy people who don't suffer from a cardiovascular disease are prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs, known as statins, if they meet certain risk criteria.

Pharmacology - Health - 06.12.2018
Half a Million Tests and Many Mosquitoes Later, New Buzz about a Malaria Prevention Drug
Researchers tested chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the malaria parasite at an earlier lifecycle stage than most current drugs, revealing chemical starting points for new malaria preventatives Most malaria drugs are designed to reduce symptoms after infection. They work by blocking replication of the disease-causing parasites in human blood, but they don't prevent infection or transmission via mosquitoes.

Health - Pharmacology - 05.12.2018
Opioid prescriptions from dentists linked to youth addiction risk
In teenagers and young adults, receiving opioids from dental providers is linked with elevated risk for continued opioid use and abuse, a Stanford study has found. Teens and young adults who receive their initial opioid prescriptions from their dentists or oral surgeons are at increased risk for opioid addiction in the following year, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found.

Pharmacology - Administration - 04.12.2018
Researchers force breakthrough in the administration of natural painkillers
Charlotte Martin and Steven Ballet of the VUB Research Group of Organic Chemistry have succeeded in developing an injectable hydrogel that can be used to administer natural painkillers in a minimally invasive manner. The hydrogel is broken down naturally in the body and has a pain-relieving effect of 3 to 4 days.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.12.2018
Soil bacteria provide a promising E. coli treatment
E. coli , the notorious bug associated with severe food poisoning and usually caught from undercooked meat, is a common concern for anyone cooking over the festive period. While thoroughly cooking meat and washing vegetables and hands after food preparation can prevent E. coli infection, treatment for the severe stomach bug can be difficult, as antibiotics are known to make the disease worse by releasing a potent toxin into the infected person's gut.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.12.2018
Requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse
Women who experience domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more than twice as likely to seek emergency contraception as other women, according to a study by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded researchers at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London, suggesting that requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 03.12.2018
New drug combination could be more effective against melanoma
New drug combination could be more effective against melanoma
Chemists discover an unexpected synergy between two types of cancer drugs. A class of cancer drugs called protein kinase inhibitors is one of the most effective treatments for melanoma. However, in many cases, tumors eventually become resistant to the drugs and cause a relapse in the patient. A new study from MIT suggests that combining kinase inhibitors with experimental drugs known as ribonucleases could lead to better results.

Pharmacology - Health - 03.12.2018
Longer-term follow-up data demonstrate sustained benefit of polatuzumab vedotin-based treatment in relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
Polatuzumab vedotin in combination with MabThera/Rituxan (rituximab) plus bendamustine more than doubled overall survival, compared to MabThera/Rituxan plus bendamustine alone in the phase Ib/II GO29365 study Polatuzumab vedotin has the potential to provide a promising new treatment option at first relapse Results from the GO29365 study, the first and only randomised study to suggest a survival benefit for patients not eligible for a haematopoie

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 29.11.2018
’Chemputer’ promises app-controlled revolution for drug production
A radical new method of producing drug molecules, which uses downloadable blueprints to easily and reliably synthesise organic chemicals via a programmable ‘chemputer', could be set to democratise the pharmaceutical industry, scientists say. Chemputer In a new paper published online in the journal Science today (November 29) , researchers from the University of Glasgow present for the first time how synthesis of important drug molecules can be achieved in an affordable and modular chemical-robot system they call a chemputer.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.11.2018
New techniques to study deadly ovarian cancer
A particularly deadly form of ovarian cancer is so deadly in part because it is quick to develop resistance to the drugs used to treat it. Now, a team is using new materials and imaging techniques to better understand the disease. Facebook Twitter Email As if a cancer diagnosis isn't bad enough, women with one of the most common forms of ovarian cancer face a hard reality.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.11.2018
An opioid epidemic may be looming in Mexico - and the U.S. may be partly responsible
An opioid epidemic may be looming in Mexico - and the U.S. may be partly responsible
FINDINGS Opioid use in Mexico has been low, but national and international factors are converging and a threat of increased drug and addiction rates exists. Many of these factors may have originated in the U.S., making this a potential joint U.S.-Mexico epidemic. BACKGROUND Previously, various cultural and legislative factors had combined to keep opioid use low in Mexico.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 29.11.2018
Measuring cancer cell
Measuring cancer cell "fitness" reveals drug susceptibility
Together, cell growth rate and gene expression shed light on why some tumor cells survive treatment. By studying both the physical and genomic features of cancer cells, MIT researchers have come up with a new way to investigate why some cancer cells survive drug treatment while others succumb. Their new approach, which combines measurements of cell mass and growth rate with analysis of a cell's gene expression, could be used to reveal new drug targets that would make cancer treatment more effective.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.11.2018
New Stem-Cell Therapy to Improve Fight against Leukemia
Stem-cell transplantation is an effective form of therapy to fight leukemia. In many cases, however, the transferred immune cells of the donor also attack the recipients' healthy tissue ' often with fatal consequences. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now identified a molecule that plays a key role in this process.

Pharmacology - Health - 28.11.2018
Potential arthritis treatment prevents cartilage breakdown
Potential arthritis treatment prevents cartilage breakdown
Injectable material made of nanoscale particles can deliver arthritis drugs throughout cartilage. Osteoarthritis, a disease that causes severe joint pain, affects more than 20 million people in the United States. Some drug treatments can help alleviate the pain, but there are no treatments that can reverse or slow the cartilage breakdown associated with the disease.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.11.2018
Research suggests widely used breast cancer therapy doesn't cause cognitive decline
Research suggests widely used breast cancer therapy doesn’t cause cognitive decline
UCLA researchers have found that commonly used hormone therapies for women diagnosed with breast cancer do not appear to cause significant cognitive dysfunction following the treatment. Endocrine therapy has become an essential part of treatment for the many women diagnosed with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer, in which hormones, such as estrogen, promote cancer growth.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 27.11.2018
New technique for identifying 'small' molecules could accelerate drug discovery and manufacturing
New technique for identifying ’small’ molecules could accelerate drug discovery and manufacturing
Science + Technology UCLA chemist says new process is like 'going from riding a tricycle to driving a Ferrari' Penny Jennings A UCLA-led team of scientists has developed a new technique that will enable researchers to easily and quickly determine the structures of organic molecules using very small samples.

Pharmacology - Health - 26.11.2018
Some research may be encouraging ineffective prescriptions, says new study
Concerns raised about efficacy of off-label use of already approved drugs A new paper published by McGill University researchers in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that some clinical trials may promote the use of ineffective and costly treatments. That's the opposite of what clinical trials are aimed at, namely preventing ineffective and costly treatments from being taken up by physicians and patients.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 26.11.2018
Study in mice suggests drug to turn fat 'brown' could help fight obesity
Study in mice suggests drug to turn fat ’brown’ could help fight obesity
Our bodies contain two types of fat: white fat and brown fat. While white fat stores calories, brown fat burns energy and could help us lose weight. Now, scientists at the University of Cambridge have found a way of making the white fat 'browner' and increasing the efficiency of brown fat.

Pharmacology - Health - 26.11.2018
Promise in new treatment for peanut allergy
Controlled ingestion of peanut protein could help build tolerance in peanut allergy sufferers. Authors of a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine say an oral immunotherapy drug they tested could be the first FDA-approved medication of its kind for people with peanut allergy. The medication, called AR101, is derived from peanut protein.