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Environment - Physics - 22.04.2019
Scientists climb UChicago buildings to study air quality and pollution
The bell tower of Rockefeller Memorial Chapel is normally populated by tourists and the University's carillonneur. But scientists recently scaled its 271 stone steps to the highest point on campus in order to study air quality and pollution across Chicago. At Rockefeller, researchers from UChicago and Harvard University ran a long tube down the stone tower to a humming machine, which analyzed air for methane as it blew past the tower.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.04.2019
Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation
Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation
Detailed models provide insight into 3-D structures of genes and the role of 3-D organization in gene function A Los Alamos-led team created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 22, 2019-Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model and will help researchers to better understand and develop cures for diseases like cancer.

Physics - 19.04.2019
Thermodynamic Magic Enables Cooling without Energy Consumption
Thermodynamic Magic Enables Cooling without Energy Consumption
Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed an amazingly simple device that allows heat to flow temporarily from a cold to a warm object without an external power supply. Intriguingly, the process initially appears to contradict the fundamental laws of physics. If you put a teapot of boiling water on the kitchen table, it will gradually cool down.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.04.2019
American Academy of Arts and Sciences Elects Four Berkeley Lab Scientists
From left to right: Susan Hubbard, Kam-Biu Luk, Jeffrey Long, and Claire Tomlin. (Credit: Berkeley Lab/UC Berkeley) Four scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a prestigious, 239-year old honorary society that recognizes accomplished scholars, scientists and artists in academia, the humanities, arts, business, and government.

Physics - Materials Science - 18.04.2019
Electric Skyrmions Charge Ahead for Next-Generation Data Storage
Electric Skyrmions Charge Ahead for Next-Generation Data Storage
Berkeley Lab-led research team makes a chiral skyrmion crystal with electric properties; puts new spin on future information storage applications VIDEO: Simulation of a single polar skyrmion. Red arrows signify that this is a left-handed skyrmion. The other arrows represent the angular distribution of the dipoles.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.04.2019
Scientists invent way to trap mysterious ’dark world’ particle at Large Hadron Collider
Now that they've identified the Higgs boson, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have set their sights on an even more elusive target. All around us is dark matter and dark energy-the invisible stuff that binds the galaxy together, but which no one has been able to directly detect. "We know for sure there's a dark world, and there's more energy in it than there is in ours," said LianTao Wang, a University of Chicago professor of physics who studies how to find signals in large particle accelerators like the LHC.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.04.2019
10 ways SLAC’s X-ray laser has transformed science
Share This Article Electrons accelerated by SLAC's linear accelerator enter the LCLS undulator hall and run a gauntlet of 32 powerful undulators. Each undulator contains 224 magnets whose alternating poles force the electrons to zigzag violently and radiate X-rays. By the time they leave the undulator hall, the X-ray laser pulses are a billion times brighter than beams from traditional synchrotron X-ray sources, opening a new realm of possible experiments and discoveries.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.04.2019
First results from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter
First results from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter
10 April 2019 New evidence of the impact of the recent planet-encompassing dust storm on water in the atmosphere, and a surprising lack of methane, are among the scientific highlights of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter's first year in orbit. Two papers are published in the journal Nature today describing the new results, and reported in a dedicated press briefing at the European Geosciences Union in Vienna.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.04.2019
Wonder material: individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time
Wonder material: individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time
Tiny, individual, flexible ribbons of crystalline phosphorus have been made and measured an international collaboration, in a world first, and they could revolutionise electronics and fast-charging battery technology. Since the isolation of 2-dimensional phosphorene (the phosphorus equivalent of graphene) in 2014, more than 100 theoretical studies have predicted that new and exciting and properties could emerge by producing narrow ‘ribbons' of this material.

Physics - Materials Science - 08.04.2019
KU Leuven engineers calculate where microplastics will end up
What is the impact of weathering processes on microplastics, and how do the particles spread across seas and oceans' Computer models developed by hydraulics engineers from KU Leuven may help to find the answers. Through rivers and wastewater, enormous amounts of minuscule plastic particles end up in our seas and oceans.

Physics - 04.04.2019
In quantum breakthrough, scientists demonstrate ’one-way street’ for energy flow
A basic rule in our lives is that if energy can flow in one direction, then it can also flow in the reverse direction. For example, if you open a window and yell at someone outside, you also can hear if they yell back. But what if there was a way to create a "one-way street" for mechanical energy that only allows heat and sound to flow in one direction?

Physics - 04.04.2019
Detecting pollution with a compact laser source
Detecting pollution with a compact laser source
Researchers at EPFL have developed a simple mid-infrared laser source that can be used to detect pollution in the air or molecules in someone's breath. Their system takes up considerably less space than the large ones typically used for such tasks. Researchers at EPFL have come up with a new middle infrared light source that can detect greenhouse and other gases, as well as molecules in a person's breath.

Health - Physics - 04.04.2019
Black nanoparticles slow the growth of tumors
Black nanoparticles slow the growth of tumors
The dark skin pigment melanin protects us from the sun's damaging rays by absorbing light energy and converting it to heat. This could make it a very effective tool in tumor diagnosis and treatment, as demonstrated by a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.04.2019
Dark Energy Instrument's Lenses See the Night Sky for the First Time
Dark Energy Instrument’s Lenses See the Night Sky for the First Time
DESI project reaches important milestone in successfully demonstrating precise focusing, alignment of its lens assembly On April 1, the dome of the Mayall Telescope near Tucson, Arizona, opened to the night sky, and starlight poured through the assembly of six large lenses that were carefully packaged and aligned for a new instrument that will launch later this year.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 03.04.2019
Novel nanophotonic chips for encrypted data transfer: Quantum communication
Novel nanophotonic chips for encrypted data transfer: Quantum communication
A giant cylindrical refrigerator, an electron-beam pattern generator, a cleanroom, etching equipment. Sometimes it takes a lot of big things to make something very small. The nanoscientists at the University of Münster headed by Prof. Wolfram Pernice and Prof. Carsten Schuck know this only too well: they use these and other devices to produce nanophotonic chips the size of a one-cent piece.

Life Sciences - Physics - 02.04.2019
Zooming in on an Inner-Cell DNA Repair Shop
A team of scientists has constructed the first complete atomic blueprint of a complicated protein that is crucial to repairing and reading DNA This video shows an animated structural model of TFIIH, a large protein assembly that helps repair and read our genome. Berkeley Lab scientists used an advanced cryo-electron microscope to generate the first-ever atomic map of TFIIH's structure.

Physics - Health - 02.04.2019
Harnessing photonics for at-home disease detection
Harnessing photonics for at-home disease detection
With nothing more than a photonic chip and an ordinary camera, EPFL researchers have managed to count biomolecules one by one in a small sample and determine their position. Their tiny device - a marriage of optics and smart image analysis - is even able to detect a graphene sheet only a single atom thick.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 01.04.2019
Skyrmions could provide next generation data storage
Skyrmions could provide next generation data storage
Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham, Bristol and Colorado, Boulder have moved a step closer to developing the next generation of data storage and processing devices, using an emerging science called skyrmionics. Skyrmionics focuses on harnessing the properties of nanometer-sized structures in magnetic films called skyrmions.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 01.04.2019
Where space missions are born
Where space missions are born
1 April 2019 A high-resolution radar mission to Earth's 'evil twin' Venus, a spacecraft to detect the most powerful explosions in the Universe and an observatory for the cool, dusty cosmos to investigate the origins of stars: ESA's Concurrent Design Facility has performed feasibility studies of contending candidates for the fifth medium class mission in the Agency's Cosmic Vision science programme, planned for launch in 2032.

Life Sciences - Physics - 01.04.2019
Breakthrough Study of Cell Signaling Holds Promise for Immune Research and Beyond
A team of physical chemists led by Berkeley Lab has unraveled the inner workings of a process that allows hard-working T cells to tune out fake signals The atomic structure of the SOS protein, a cell messaging molecule that uses a unique timing mechanism to regulate activation of a critical immune system pathway.
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