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Physics - 14:00
Ultrafast optical switching can save overwhelmed datacenters
Ultrafast optical switching can save overwhelmed datacenters
EPFL and Microsoft Research scientists demonstrated ultrafast optical circuit switching using a chip-based soliton comb laser and a completely passive diffraction grating device. This particular architecture could enable an energy-efficient optical datacenter to meet enormous data bandwidth requirements in future.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 09:04
Test procedures under scrutiny
Test procedures under scrutiny
Comparatively, neutrons detect most defects in 3D printed components In the manufacture of turbines conventional processes often reach their limits. Therefore, additive manufacturing is increasingly used to produce complex, curved components with intricate structures. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now examined common methods used to locate defects inside components.

Materials Science - Physics - 08:09
Flexible sensors slide into the future with new approach to electronic printing
A new method of 'sliding' delicate high-performance electronics onto flexible surfaces could enable future developments in electronics, scientists say. Engineers from the University of Glasgow claim they have found a way to solve one of the key problems of contact printing - a method of planting electronics onto bendable plastic surfaces to create flexible electronic circuits and devices.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 19.10.2021
Cambridge physicists announce results that boost evidence for new fundamental physics | University of Cambridge
Cambridge physicists announce results that boost evidence for new fundamental physics | University of Cambridge
Results announced by the LHCb experiment at CERN have revealed further hints for phenomena that cannot be explained by our current theory of fundamental physics. The fact that we've seen the same effect as our colleagues did in March certainly boosts the chances that we might genuinely be on the brink of discovering something new Harry Cliff In March 2020, the same experiment released evidence of particles breaking one of the core principles of the Standard Model - our best theory of particles and forces - suggesting the possible existence of new fundamental particles and forces.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 18.10.2021
Uncovering the secrets of ultra-low frequency gravitational waves
Uncovering the secrets of ultra-low frequency gravitational waves
New methods of detecting ultra-low frequency gravitational waves can be combined with other, less sensitive measurements to deliver fresh insights into the early development of our universe, according to researchers at the University of Birmingham. Gravitational waves - ripples in the fabric of Einstein's spacetime - that cross the universe at the speed of light have all sorts of wavelengths, or frequencies.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.10.2021
Atoms are packed in amorphous materials
Many substances around us, from table salt and sugar to most metals, are arranged into crystals. Because their molecules are laid out in an orderly, repetitive pattern, much is understood about their structure. However, a far greater number of substances — including rubber, glass and most liquids — lack that fundamental order throughout, making it difficult to determine their molecular structure.

Physics - 18.10.2021
Ultrafast control of quantum materials
Ultrafast control of quantum materials
An international team with participation of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI shows how light can fundamentally change the properties of solids and how these effects can be used for future applications. The researchers summarise their progress in this field, which is based among other things on experiments that can also be carried out at the Swiss X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL, in the scientific journal Reviews of Modern Physics .

Physics - Materials Science - 14.10.2021
Exotic magnetic states in miniature dimensions
Exotic magnetic states in miniature dimensions
Led by scientists at Empa and the International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, an international team of researchers from Switzerland, Portugal, Germany, and Spain have succeeded in building carbon-based quantum spin chains, where they captured the emergence of one of the cornerstone models of quantum magnetism first proposed by the 2016 Nobel laureate F. D.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.10.2021
The planet does not fall far from the star
The planet does not fall far from the star
A compositional link between planets and their respective host star has long been assumed in astronomy. For the first time now, a team of scientists, with the participation of researchers of the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS from the University of Bern and the University of Zürich, deliver empirical evidence to support the assumption - and partly contradict it at the same time.

Life Sciences - Physics - 14.10.2021
How bacteria create a piggy bank for the lean times
IMAGE CAPTION: Cyanophycin biosynthesis looks like a windshield wiper in action: one domain is responsible for adding aspartate (Asp), a second domain is responsible for adding arginine (Arg), two nitrogen-rich amino acids, and the third domain holds on to the growing chain of cyanophycin. CREDIT: Schmeing lab Bacteria can store extra resources for the lean times.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 13.10.2021
How the Sun’s magnetic forces arrange gas particles
Research team including Göttingen University observes charged particles 70 percent faster than uncharged Solar prominences hover above the visible solar disk like giant clouds, held there by a supporting framework of magnetic forces, originating from layers deep within the Sun. The magnetic lines of force are moved by ever-present gas currents - and when the supporting framework moves, so does the prominence cloud.

Physics - Electroengineering - 13.10.2021
How to force photons to never bounce back
How to force photons to never bounce back
Scientists have developed a topology-based method that forces microwave photons to travel along a one way path, despite unprecedented levels of disorder and obstacles on their way. This discovery paves the way to a new generation of high-frequency circuits and extremely robust, compact communication devices.

Physics - 13.10.2021
How Long Does a Neutron Live?
Particles called neutrons are typically very content inside atoms. They stick around for billions of years and longer inside some of the atoms that make up matter in our universe. But when neutrons are free and floating alone outside of an atom, they start to decay into protons and other particles. Their lifetime is short, lasting only about 15 minutes.

Physics - 12.10.2021
Novel treatment technology ’could reduce UK nuclear waste burden’
Researchers at The University of Manchester have developed a novel treatment technology that may help to significantly reduce the UK's nuclear waste burden. The management of radioactive graphite waste is one of the major challenges of nuclear power plant decommissioning throughout the world, particularly in the UK, as well as in France and Russia.

Physics - Materials Science - 12.10.2021
Research Team Unlocks Secret Path to a Quantum Future
Research Team Unlocks Secret Path to a Quantum Future
By Rachel Berkowitz In 1998, researchers including Mark Kubinec of UC Berkeley performed one of the first simple quantum computations using individual molecules. They used pulses of radio waves to flip the spins of two nuclei in a molecule, with each spin's "up" or "down" orientation storing information in the way that a "0" or "1" state stores information in a classical data bit.

Physics - Life Sciences - 08.10.2021
Teaching Ancient Brains New Tricks
Carnegie Mellon University The science of physics has strived to find the best possible explanations for understanding matter and energy in the physical world across all scales of space and time. Modern physics is filled with complex concepts and ideas that have revolutionized the way we see (and don't see) the universe.

Health - Physics - 07.10.2021
Smart slides help detect cancer
Smart slides help detect cancer
Australian researchers have created 'smart' microscope slides that can detect breast cancer cells. The innovative tech, NanoMSlide modifies microscope slides at the nanoscale and has been developed by researchers at La Trobe University. Now the team and their partners, including researchers from ANU, have proved it works, with their new study showing how the slides use striking colour contrasts to instantly detect disease.

Physics - 06.10.2021
Novel quantum effect discovered in naturally occurring graphene
Novel quantum effect discovered in naturally occurring graphene
International research team led by University of Göttingen finds atomically-thin carbon generates its own magnetic field Usually, the electrical resistance of a material depends very much on its physical dimensions and fundamental properties. Under special circumstances, however, this resistance can adopt a fixed value that is independent of the basic material properties and "quantised" (meaning that it changes in discrete steps rather than continuously).

Health - Physics - 05.10.2021
Next-generation camera can better locate tumors
Next-generation camera can better locate tumors
Scientists at EPFL and Dartmouth College in the US have developed a system that can, for the first time, both pinpoint the exact location of a tumor and measure its depth. Their technology employs a high-tech camera developed at EPFL's Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory. A few years ago, Edoardo Charbon, an EPFL professor and head of the Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory, unveiled a new, ultra-high-power camera called SwissSPAD2.

Life Sciences - Physics - 04.10.2021
How apples get their shapes
Using theory, numerical simulations and lab experiments, a team led by UCL and Harvard researchers have shown for the first time how apples get their distinct shape. Apples are among the oldest and most recognisable fruits in the world. Humans have been drawing apples for millennia - their likeness has been captured by everyone from Caravaggio to Picasso.
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