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Physics - 23.06.2020
Introducing a New Isotope: Mendelevium-244
Introducing a New Isotope: Mendelevium-244
Berkeley Lab-led team creates a new, lighter form of the element mendelevium in experiments at the 88-Inch Cyclotron The making of mendelevium-244: In this video, Berkeley Lab project scientist Jennifer Pore describes how scientists working at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron created and confirmed the discovery of a new isotope, mendelevium-244.

Physics - Materials Science - 23.06.2020
Laser allows solid-state refrigeration of a semiconductor material
Laser allows solid-state refrigeration of a semiconductor material
To the general public, lasers heat objects. And generally, that would be correct. But lasers also show promise to do quite the opposite - to cool materials. Lasers that can cool materials could revolutionize fields ranging from bio-imaging to quantum communication. In 2015, University of Washington researchers announced that they can use a laser to cool water and other liquids below room temperature.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 23.06.2020
Cardiff student at the centre of LIGO's mysterious new discovery
Cardiff student at the centre of LIGO’s mysterious new discovery
A Cardiff University student has found himself at the centre of a major breakthrough discovery that could potentially help to solve a decades-old mystery. Charlie Hoy, currently in the third year of his PhD and a member of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) Scientific Collaboration, has played a leading role in deciphering new data observed from the violent collision of two objects roughly 800 million light-years away from Earth.

Environment - Physics - 22.06.2020
New gold nanoparticle purifies water of difficult pollutants
Researchers have found a promising technology for clearing water of pollutants: a new nanoparticle that converts light to heat. Trace amounts of contaminants such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and perfluorooctanoic acid in sources of drinking water have posed significant health risks to humans in recent years.

Physics - Life Sciences - 22.06.2020
Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells
Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells
EPFL biophysicists have developed a high-throughput super-resolution microscope to probe nanoscale structures and dynamics of mammalian cells, showing in unprecedented detail the twists and turns of an organelle important for cell division. If you want to understand the underlying mechanisms of cellular motility and division, then the centriole is the organelle of interest.

Environment - Physics - 22.06.2020
Purifying water with a partly coated gold nanoparticle
Purifying water with a partly coated gold nanoparticle
'Janus' nanorods convert light to heat that can destroy pollutants By William Weir Special to the Rice News With a new nanoparticle that converts light to heat, a team of researchers has found a promising technology for clearing water of pollutants. Trace amounts of contaminants such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals and perfluorooctanoic acid in drinking water sources have posed significant health risks to humans in recent years.

Physics - 22.06.2020
Experimentally Identifying Effective Theories in Many-Body Systems
Experimentally Identifying Effective Theories in Many-Body Systems
One goal of science is to find physical descriptions of nature by studying how basic system components interact with one another. For complex many-body systems, effective theories are frequently used to this end. They allow describing the interactions without having to observe a system on the smallest of scales.

Electroengineering - Physics - 22.06.2020
Critical communications component made on a flexible wooden film
In the not-too-distant future, flexible electronics will open the door to new products like foldable phones, tablets that can be rolled, paper-thin displays and wearable sensors that monitor health data. Developing these new bendy products, however, means using materials like new plastics and thin films to replace the rigid circuit boards and bulky electronic components that currently occupy the interiors of cell phones and other gadgets.

Life Sciences - Physics - 22.06.2020
This Enigmatic Protein Sculpts DNA to Repair Harmful Damage
This Enigmatic Protein Sculpts DNA to Repair Harmful Damage
Scientists have determined how a protein called XPG binds to and reshapes damaged DNA, illuminating its role in averting genetic disease and cancer Sometimes, when something is broken, the first step to fixing it is to break it even more. In a recent example, scientists seeking to understand the mechanism of a DNA-repairing protein have discovered that the molecule performs its functions by first marking and then further breaking damaged DNA.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.06.2020
Researchers cut atom-sized patterns into 2D materials
Researchers cut atom-sized patterns into 2D materials
EPFL researchers have developed a high-precision technology that enables them to carve nanometric patterns into two-dimensional materials. With their pioneering nanotechnology, EPFL researchers have achieved the impossible. They can now use heat to break the links between atoms with a miniature scalpel.

Life Sciences - Physics - 19.06.2020
Engineers design a device that operates like a brain synapse
Engineers design a device that operates like a brain synapse
Ion-based technology may enable energy-efficient simulations of the brain's learning process, for neural network AI systems. Teams around the world are building ever more sophisticated artificial intelligence systems of a type called neural networks, designed in some ways to mimic the wiring of the brain, for carrying out tasks such as computer vision and natural language processing.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.06.2020
Researchers cut nanometer-sized patterns into 2D materials
Researchers cut nanometer-sized patterns into 2D materials
EPFL researchers have developed a high-precision technology that enables them to carve nanometric patterns into two-dimensional materials. With their pioneering nanotechnology, EPFL researchers have achieved the impossible. They can now use heat to break the links between atoms with a miniature scalpel.

Chemistry - Physics - 18.06.2020
Researchers create a photographic film of a molecular switch
Researchers create a photographic film of a molecular switch
Molecular switches - they are the molecular counterparts of electrical switches and play an important role in many processes in nature. Such molecules can reversibly interconvert between two or more states and thereby control molecular processes. In living organisms, for example, they play a role in muscle contraction but also our visual perception is based on the dynamics of a molecular switch in the eye.

Physics - 18.06.2020
Capturing moving subjects in still-life quality
Capturing moving subjects in still-life quality
Researchers at EPFL's Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a technique for building crystal-clear images of moving subjects. The team will present its paper at the prestigious SIGGRAPH 2020 conference in August. In 2019, Edoardo Charbon, a professor at EPFL's School of Engineering (STI), was attending a workshop in Canada.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.06.2020
KU Leuven researchers shed new light on solar flares
KU Leuven researchers shed new light on solar flares
Plasma astrophysicists at KU Leuven have created the first self-consistent simulation of the physical processes that occur during a solar flare. The researchers used Flemish supercomputers and a new combination of physical models. Solar flares are explosions on the surface of the Sun that release an enormous amount of energy, equivalent to a trillion 'Little Boy' atomic bombs exploding at the same time.

Physics - 18.06.2020
Laser technology: The Turbulence and the Comb
Laser technology: The Turbulence and the Comb
A particularly well-ordered kind of laser light can be created by turbulence, which is usually responsible for very disordered phenomena. It is a very special kind of light, which can be used for important measurements: so-called frequency combs play a major role in laser research today. While the light of an ordinary laser only has one single, well-defined wavelength, a frequency comb consists of different light frequencies, which are precisely arranged at regular distances, much like the teeth of a comb.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.06.2020
Surprising Signal in the XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment
Surprising Signal in the XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment
Scientists from the international XENON collaboration under participation of the University of Münster announced today that data from their XENON1T, the world's most sensitive dark matter experiment, show a surprising excess of events. The scientists do not claim to have found dark matter. Instead, they say to have observed an unexpected rate of events, the source of which is not yet fully understood.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.06.2020
Surprising Signal in Dark Matter Detector
Surprising Signal in Dark Matter Detector
When analyzing data from the XENON1T detector for dark matter, a signal excess was observed. The UZH researchers do not yet know for sure where this unexpected signal comes from. They say the origins could be relatively banal, but they could also indicate the existence of new particles or hitherto unknown properties of neutrinos.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.06.2020
A busy signal from outer space
A busy signal from outer space
It beats like a busy signal - one scientists were excited to get. A new study in Nature reports the discovery of a fast radio burst (FRB) that pulses at regular intervals - every 16.35 days - from a nearby galaxy. " Some FRBs are known to repeat, but only irregularly, with cadences ranging from seconds to days," said Laura Newburgh , an assistant professor of physics at Yale involved in the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME), which produced the research.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.06.2020
Astronomers detect regular rhythm of radio waves, with origins unknown
Astronomers detect regular rhythm of radio waves, with origins unknown
Signal from 500 million light years away is the first periodic pattern of radio bursts detected. A team of astronomers, including researchers at MIT, has picked up on a curious, repeating rhythm of fast radio bursts emanating from an unknown source outside our galaxy, 500 million light years away. Fast radio bursts, or FRBs, are short, intense flashes of radio waves that are thought to be the product of small, distant, extremely dense objects, though exactly what those objects might be is a longstanding mystery in astrophysics.

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