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Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 29.04.2020
Switchbacks and spikes: Parker Solar Probe data consistent with 20-year-old theory
Switchbacks and spikes: Parker Solar Probe data consistent with 20-year-old theory
Continued analysis of Parker Solar Probe data is starting to create a clearer picture of the sun's magnetic activity, which may bolster our ability to predict dangerous solar events. And the more information that comes in, the more it all fits with theories posited at the turn of the millennium by researchers at the University of Michigan.

Computer Science - Physics - 29.04.2020
New Active Compounds from the Computer
Open-source platform "VirtualFlow" examines billions of molecules in a very short time / Joint press release issued by Freie Universität Berlin and Technische Universität Berlin No 071/2020 from Apr 29, 2020 The development of new active compounds in medicine can take many years and potentially cost billions of euros.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 29.04.2020
How growth of the scientific enterprise influenced a century of quantum physics
How growth of the scientific enterprise influenced a century of quantum physics
In a new book, Professor David Kaiser describes dramatic shifts in the history of an evolving discipline. Austrian quantum theorist Erwin Schrödinger first used the term "entanglement," in 1935, to describe the mind-bending phenomenon in which the actions of two distant particles are bound up with each other.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.04.2020
Superconductivity: It's Hydrogen's Fault
Superconductivity: It’s Hydrogen’s Fault
Nickel is supposed to herald a new age of superconductivity - but this is proving more difficult than expected. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) can now explain why. Last summer, a new age for high-temperature superconductivity was proclaimed - the nickel age. It was discovered that there are promising superconductors in a special class of materials, the so-called nickelates, which can conduct electric current without any resistance even at high temperatures.

Physics - Electroengineering - 24.04.2020
Bose-Einstein condensate: magnetic particles behave repulsively
Bose-Einstein condensate: magnetic particles behave repulsively
Data transmission that works by means of magnetic waves instead of electric currents - for many scientists, this is the basis of future technologies that will make transmission faster and individual components smaller and more energy-efficient. Magnons, the particles of magnetism, serve as moving information carriers.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 23.04.2020
A major step towards the explanation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry
A major step towards the explanation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry
The international T2K Collaboration has published results showing the strongest evidence to date implying the breaking of the symmetry between matter and antimatter in so-called neutrino oscillations. This is a major step towards the understanding of the dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe.

Physics - 22.04.2020
A material with a particular twist
A material with a particular twist
In a material made of two thin crystal layers that are slightly twisted with respect to each other, researchers at ETH have studied the behaviour of strongly interacting electrons. Doing so, they found a number of surprising properties. Many modern technologies are based on special materials, such as the semiconductors that are important for computers, inside of which electrons can move more or less freely.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.04.2020
Rotating Galaxies Galore
New results from an ambitious sky survey program, called ALPINE, reveal that rotating disk-shaped galaxies may have existed in large numbers earlier in the universe than previously thought. The ALPINE program, formally named "ALMA Large Program to Investigate C+ at Early Times," uses data obtained from 70 hours of sky observations with the ALMA observatory (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) in Chile, in combination with data from previous observations by a host of other telescopes, including the W. M.

Physics - Materials Science - 21.04.2020
Cool down fast to advance quantum nanotechnology
Cool down fast to advance quantum nanotechnology
Rapidly cooling magnon particles proves a surprisingly effective way to create an elusive quantum state of matter, called a Bose-Einstein condensate. The discovery can help advance quantum physics research and is a step towards the long-term goal of quantum computing at room temperature. An international team of scientists have found an easy way to trigger an unusual state of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.04.2020
Photonic microwave generation using on-chip optical frequency combs
Photonic microwave generation using on-chip optical frequency combs
Using integrated photonic chips fabricated at EPFL, scientists have demonstrated laser-based microwave generators. These microwave signals, as well as their optical carriers, could be used in radars, satellite communications and future 5G wireless networks. In our information society, the synthesis, distribution, and processing of radio and microwave signals are ubiquitous in wireless networks, telecommunications, and radars.

Physics - 17.04.2020
MegaX, the first camera to capture the smallest particles of light
MegaX, the first camera to capture the smallest particles of light
EPFL scientists, working in association with Canon, have developed a camera that can take 3D images with record-breaking speed and resolution "It's something I'd been dreaming of for a long time," says Edoardo Charbon, an EPFL professor and head of the Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory in EPFL's School of Engineering.

Health - Physics - 17.04.2020
SLAC joins the global fight against COVID-19
SLAC Overview Our Mission, Vision & Values SLAC By The Numbers Director's Office Past SLAC Directors and Deputy Directors Wolfgang (Pief) K. H.

Materials Science - Physics - 16.04.2020
Shedding light on dark traps
Shedding light on dark traps
Researchers pinpoint the origin of defects that sap the performance of next-generation solar technology. We now know what to target to bring up the performances of perovskites. Samuel Stranks A multi-institutional collaboration, co-led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has identified the source of efficiency-limiting defects in potential materials for next-generation solar cells and LEDs.

Physics - Materials Science - 16.04.2020
Advance could enable remote control of soft robots
An applied magnetic field (in blue) can cause magnetized particles embedded in a soft material to rearrange themselves into new patterns. By harnessing this phenomenon, researchers can fine-tune the soft material's properties. Image courtesy Xin Zou, Grainger Institute for Engineering Soft materials, such as rubber or polymers that can endure drastic changes to their shape, are promising for applications where flexibility and shapeshifting abilities are paramount.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.04.2020
Where did the antimatter go? Neutrinos shed promising new light
Where did the antimatter go? Neutrinos shed promising new light
We live in a world of matter - because matter overtook antimatter , though they were both created in equal amounts by the Big Bang when our universe began. As featured on the cover of Nature on 16 April 2020, neutrinos and the associated antimatter particles, antineutrinos, are reported to have a high likelihood of differing behaviour that offers a promising path to explaining the asymmetry between matter and antimatter.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.04.2020
Strongest evidence yet that neutrinos explain how the universe exists
Strongest evidence yet that neutrinos explain how the universe exists
New data throws more support behind the theory that neutrinos are the reason the universe is dominated by matter. The current laws of physics do not explain why matter persists over antimatter - why the universe is made of ‘stuff'. Scientists believe equal amounts of matter and antimatter were created at the beginning of the universe, but this would mean they should have wiped each other out, annihilating the universe as it began.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.04.2020
Matter-antimatter difference found in neutrino oscillations
One of the great scientific puzzles of our time is why we live in a universe full of matter rather than antimatter. Wherever we look, we observe that matter dominates over antimatter, yet we believe that matter and antimatter were created in equal amounts soon after the Big Bang. To reconcile these two facts there must be some difference in the way matter and antimatter behave.

Physics - Chemistry - 15.04.2020
Nanosensor can alert a smartphone when plants are stressed
Nanosensor can alert a smartphone when plants are stressed
Carbon nanotubes embedded in leaves detect chemical signals that are produced when a plant is damaged. MIT engineers have developed a way to closely track how plants respond to stresses such as injury, infection, and light damage, using sensors made of carbon nanotubes. These sensors can be embedded in plant leaves, where they report on hydrogen peroxide signaling waves.

Health - Physics - 14.04.2020
Researchers reengineer COVID-19 face masks
Researchers reengineer COVID-19 face masks
Stanford engineers have developed a new type of protective face mask that can counteract the side effects of oxygen deficiency. John Xu is a research scientist in the lab of mechanical engineer Friedrich "Fritz" Prinz , where the two are known for their work on creating fuel cells for next-generation cars.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.04.2020
Helps explain why the solar wind is hotter than expected
When a fire extinguisher is opened, the compressed carbon dioxide forms ice crystals around the nozzle, providing a visual example of the physics principle that gases and plasmas cool as they expand. When our sun expels plasma in the form of solar wind, the wind also cools as it expands through space - but not nearly as much as the laws of physics would predict.

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