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Physics - Chemistry - 01.06.2020
Carbon nanotube transistors make the leap from lab to factory floor
Carbon nanotube transistors make the leap from lab to factory floor
Carbon nanotube transistors are a step closer to commercial reality, now that MIT researchers have demonstrated that the devices can be made swiftly in commercial facilities, with the same equipment used to manufacture the silicon-based transistors that are the backbone of today's computing industry.

Materials Science - Physics - 29.05.2020
Hot off the Oven
Hot off the Oven
During metal processing in the 3D laser printer, temperatures of more than 2,500 degrees Celsius are reached within milliseconds, causing some components of the alloys to evaporate. While widely considered a problem inherent to the process, Empa researchers spotted an opportunity - and are now using the effect to create new alloys with novel properties and embed them in 3D-printed metallic work pieces with micrometer precision.

Health - Physics - 29.05.2020
Three Successful Funding Bids for Collaborative Research Centres
Heidelberg University succeeded in gaining funding from the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the latest approval round for three, internationally visible collaborative research centres. In physics, the collaborative research centre (CRC) studying isolated quantum systems in experimental and theoretical investigations will continue its work in the second funding period (CRC 1225).

Physics - Chemistry - 27.05.2020
Exotic particles offer deeper insight into matter and antimatter
Exotic particles offer deeper insight into matter and antimatter
At the European nuclear and particle physics laboratory CERN, physicists can produce extremely rare short-lived atoms and molecules. Researchers from KU Leuven have shown that these particles lead the way to uncharted territory in nuclear and particle physics. One of the oldest active installations at the Centre for European Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva is the ISOLDE laboratory.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.05.2020
Physicists measure a short-lived radioactive molecule for first time
Physicists measure a short-lived radioactive molecule for first time
Molecules containing heavy and deformed radioactive nuclei may help scientists to measure symmetry-violating phenomena and identify signs of dark matter. Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have combined the power of a super collider with techniques of laser spectroscopy to precisely measure a short-lived radioactive molecule, radium monofluoride, for the first time.

Materials Science - Physics - 26.05.2020
Watching single protons moving at water-solid interfaces
Watching single protons moving at water-solid interfaces
Scientists at EPFL have been able to observe single protons moving at the interface between water and a solid surface. Their research reveals the strong interactions of these charges with surfaces. The H+ proton consists of a single ion of hydrogen, the smallest and lightest of all the chemical elements.

Physics - Materials Science - 26.05.2020
Understanding ceramic ’mortar’ of materials may reveal ways to improve them
When most people think of ceramics, they might envision their favorite mug or a flowerpot. But modern technology is full of advanced ceramics, from silicon solar panels to ceramic superconductors and biomedical implants. Many of those advanced polycrystalline ceramics are combinations of crystalline grains which, at the microscopic level, resemble a stone fence held together with limestone mortar.

Physics - 26.05.2020
A new law in laser physics could make eye surgery simpler
A new law in laser physics could make eye surgery simpler
By revisiting a simple type of laser, scientists have discovered a way to exponentially increase the amount of energy released in incredibly short periods of time, with potential applications in surgery. Scientists have developed a new type of laser that can deliver high amounts of energy in very short bursts of time, with potential applications in eye and heart surgery or the engineering of delicate materials.

Chemistry - Physics - 26.05.2020
Finds electrical fields can throw a curveball
Finds electrical fields can throw a curveball
Particle-scale phenomenon akin to the swerving of a curveball could allow selective separation of suspended nanomaterials. MIT researchers have discovered a phenomenon that could be harnessed to control the movement of tiny particles floating in suspension. This approach, which requires simply applying an external electric field, may ultimately lead to new ways of performing certain industrial or medical processes that require separation of tiny suspended materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 25.05.2020
Lossless conduction at the edges
Lossless conduction at the edges
Atomically thin layers of the semimetal tungsten ditelluride conduct electricity losslessly along narrow, one-dimensional channels at the crystal edges. The material is therefore a second-order topological insulator. By obtaining experimental proof of this behavior, physicists from the University of Basel have expanded the pool of candidate materials for topological superconductivity.

Physics - 21.05.2020
New gravitational-wave model can bring neutron stars into even sharper focus
Gravitational-wave researchers at the University of Birmingham have developed a new model that promises to yield fresh insights into the structure and composition of neutron stars. The model shows that vibrations, or oscillations, inside the stars can be directly measured from the gravitational-wave signal alone.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.05.2020
Unveils details of how a widely used catalyst splits water
Unveils details of how a widely used catalyst splits water
A crystalline compound called ruthenium dioxide is widely used in industrial processes, where it's particularly important for catalyzing a chemical reaction that splits molecules of water and releases oxygen. But the exact mechanism that takes place on this material's surface, and how that reaction is affected by the orientation of the crystal surfaces, had never been determined in detail.

Health - Physics - 21.05.2020
This COVID-19 Detector Has Berkeley Lab Roots
This COVID-19 Detector Has Berkeley Lab Roots
A technology spun from carbon nanotube sensors discovered 20 years ago by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) scientists could one day help health care providers test patients for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. When Alex Zettl , Marvin Cohen , and their research teams at Berkeley Lab first demonstrated ultrasensitive oxygen sensors devised from carbon nanotubes - hollow carbon wires with walls no thicker than an atom - they envisioned a broad spectrum of applications, such as gas-leak detectors or airand water-pollution detectors.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.05.2020
Elucidating the mechanism of a light-driven sodium pump
Elucidating the mechanism of a light-driven sodium pump
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have succeeded for the first time in recording, in action, a light-driven sodium pump from bacterial cells.  The findings promise progress in the development of new methods in neurobiology. The researchers used the new X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL for their investigations.

Physics - Life Sciences - 20.05.2020
How cosmic rays may have shaped life
How cosmic rays may have shaped life
Physicists propose that the influence of cosmic rays on early life may explain nature's preference for a uniform "handedness" among biology's critical molecules. Before there were animals, bacteria or even DNA on Earth, self-replicating molecules were slowly evolving their way from simple matter to life beneath a constant shower of energetic particles from space.

Physics - Computer Science - 20.05.2020
Quantum leap: Bristol's photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
Quantum leap: Bristol’s photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
The development of quantum technologies promises to have a profound impact across science, engineering and society. Quantum computers at scale will be able to solve problems intractable on even the most powerful current supercomputers, with many revolutionary applications, for example, in the design of new drugs and materials.

Materials Science - Physics - 20.05.2020
Machine-learning tool could help develop tougher materials
Machine-learning tool could help develop tougher materials
Engineers develop a rapid screening system to test fracture resistance in billions of potential materials. For engineers developing new materials or protective coatings, there are billions of different possibilities to sort through. Lab tests or even detailed computer simulations to determine their exact properties, such as toughness, can take hours, days, or more for each variation.

Chemistry - Physics - 19.05.2020
Nature Unveiling Herself Before Science
Nature Unveiling Herself Before Science
Cutting-edge technology allows for real-time monitoring of biomineralisation as an important process of bone formation 21st century societal challenges such as demographic developments and an ageing population demand for new functional materials, such as for bone prostheses. Nature often serves as inspiration when designing these materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 18.05.2020
Efficient,
Efficient, "green" quantum-dot solar cells exploit defects
Quantum-dot approach shows promise for a new type of toxic-element-free, inexpensive, defect-tolerant solar cells This quantum-dot approach shows great promise for a new type of toxic-element-free, inexpensive solar cells that exhibit remarkable defect tolerance. Victor Klimov LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 18, 2020-Novel quantum dot solar cells developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory match the efficiency of existing quantum-dot based devices, but without lead or other toxic elements that most solar cells of this type rely on.

Physics - Materials Science - 18.05.2020
Quantum Hall effect 'reincarnated' in 3D topological materials
Quantum Hall effect ’reincarnated’ in 3D topological materials
2D order protects several entangled states that could be used in quantum computing U.S. and German physicists have found surprising evidence that one of the most famous phenomena in modern physics - the quantum Hall effect - is "reincarnated” in topological superconductors that could be used to build fault-tolerant quantum computers.

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