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Earth Sciences - Apr 24
Earth Sciences
Around three years ago, researchers on an Antarctic expedition, including Münster University palaeobotanist Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur , made an incredible discovery in northern Victoria Land. They found the 200 million-year-old footprint of an extinct reptile. The researchers have now published their findings from the hand-sized footprint in the journal “Polar Research”.
Health - Apr 24

New evidence of heart injury found in apparently healthy people could help pave the way for better long-term monitoring of cardiac health and personalised approaches to treatment, scientists say.

Health - Apr 24

University of Sydney research finds that febrile seizures after vaccination are rare, not serious and are no different to febrile seizures due to other causes, such as from a virus.

Astronomy - Apr 24
Astronomy

Researchers show young stars rapidly destroy Earth-like Nitrogen dominated atmospheres The discoveries of thousands of planets orbiting stars outside our solar system has made questions about the potential for life to form on these planets fundamentally important in modern science.

Health - Apr 24

A group of chemical and biomolecular engineers has determined that elderberries can help the fight against influenza, by reducing symptoms and severity of the virus. Folk medicines and herbal products have been used for millennia to combat a whole range of ailments, at times to the chagrin of modern scientists who have struggled to explain their medicinal benefits.


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Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 12:03
Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur on finding a reptile footprint in the Antarctic
Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur on finding a reptile footprint in the Antarctic
Around three years ago, researchers on an Antarctic expedition, including Münster University palaeobotanist Dr. Benjamin Bomfleur , made an incredible discovery in northern Victoria Land. They found the 200 million-year-old footprint of an extinct reptile. The researchers have now published their findings from the hand-sized footprint in the journal “Polar Research”.

Health - Life Sciences - 10:34
Evidence of heart injury in ’healthy’ people may lead to more effective treatment
New evidence of heart injury found in apparently healthy people could help pave the way for better long-term monitoring of cardiac health and personalised approaches to treatment, scientists say. Their findings appear today in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation, based on research conducted at the Universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, Oxford, New South Wales and Johns Hopkins University.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10:02
Rapid destruction of Earth-like atmospheres by young stars
Rapid destruction of Earth-like atmospheres by young stars
Researchers show young stars rapidly destroy Earth-like Nitrogen dominated atmospheres The discoveries of thousands of planets orbiting stars outside our solar system has made questions about the potential for life to form on these planets fundamentally important in modern science. Fundamentally important for the habitability of a planet is whether or not it can hold onto an atmosphere, which requires that the atmosphere is not completely lost early in the lifetime of the planet.

Health - 08:34
Parents reassured febrile seizures following vaccination not dangerous
University of Sydney research finds that febrile seizures after vaccination are rare, not serious and are no different to febrile seizures due to other causes, such as from a virus. New research from the University of Sydney has found the severity of febrile seizures following vaccination is no different to febrile seizures from another cause, such as from a virus, and that the majority of seizures are short-lived, self-resolving and don't require ongoing treatment.

Health - 08:34
Elderberries could help minimise flu symptoms
A group of chemical and biomolecular engineers has determined that elderberries can help the fight against influenza, by reducing symptoms and severity of the virus. Folk medicines and herbal products have been used for millennia to combat a whole range of ailments, at times to the chagrin of modern scientists who have struggled to explain their medicinal benefits.

Health - 23.04.2019
Low mobility predicts hospital readmission in older heart attack patients
Close to 20% of elderly adults who have suffered a heart attack will be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. Performance on a simple mobility test is the best predictor of whether an elderly heart attack patient will be readmitted, a Yale-led study reports. Appearing in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, the study describes the first risk model for hospital readmission specifically developed for older heart attack patients.

Computer Science / Telecom - 23.04.2019
Computer scientists design way to close ’backdoors’ in AI-based security systems
It sounds like a plot out of a spy novel, with a touch of cyberpunk: An agent approaches a secure location, protected by a facial recognition system, accessible only to a head of state or CEO. Flashing an unusually shaped earring, the agent tricks the system into thinking they're that VIP, opening the door and exposing the secrets inside.

Materials Science - 23.04.2019
Influence of the cathode on the lithium metal anode
The demand for high-energy batteries, in particular for the automotive industry, is increasing, and with it the research interest in battery technologies, which could determine the future market. A promising technology are secondary lithium metal batteries (LMBs), which combine lithium metal as an anode with, for example, cathode materials containing lithium ions.

Life Sciences - 23.04.2019
Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!
Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!
Our actions are driven by “internal states” such as anxiety, stress or thirst - which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors. How such states are represented by complex brain-wide circuits, including sub-cortical structures such as the amygdala, is unknown. In a study recently published in Science, the group of Andreas Lüthi used a deep brain imaging technique to monitor amygdala activity in active mice and revealed the neuronal dynamics encoding behavioral states.

Life Sciences - 23.04.2019
Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues
Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues
Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. The new method, pioneered by Dr Adam Perriman and colleagues, involves re-engineering the membranes of stem cells to effectively "weld" the cells together.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.04.2019
Simple and Fast Method for Radiolabelling Antibodies against Breast Cancer
Simple and Fast Method for Radiolabelling Antibodies against Breast Cancer
Radioactive antibodies that target cancer cells are used for medical diagnostics with PET imaging or for targeted radioimmunotherapy. Researchers from the University of Zurich have created a new method for radiolabelling antibodies using UV light. In less than 15 minutes, the proteins are ready-to-use for cancer imaging or therapy.

History / Archeology - Innovation / Technology - 23.04.2019
Using X-ray technology to clear up an archeological secret
In an important first, EPFL and Vaud Canton's archeology office used X-ray scanning technology to unlock the mysteries of an extremely rare chainmail shirt dating from Roman times. The results will go on display at the Cantonal Museum of Archeology and History in Lausanne from 26 April to 25 August.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 23.04.2019
Improved WIC food packages reduced children's risk for obesity
Improved WIC food packages reduced children’s risk for obesity
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research. The study of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, or WIC, was conducted by researchers from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health , Tulane University and Los Angeles-based PHFE WIC, the nation's largest local WIC agency and a program of Heluna Health.

Life Sciences - 22.04.2019
Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing
Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing
Research has shown that people who are born blind or become blind early in life often have a more nuanced sense of hearing, especially when it comes to musical abilities and tracking moving objects in space (imagine crossing a busy road using sound alone).  For decades scientists have wondered what changes in the brain might underlie these enhanced auditory abilities.

Environment - Business / Economics - 22.04.2019
Will ocean seafood farming sink or swim? UCLA study evaluates its potential
Will ocean seafood farming sink or swim? UCLA study evaluates its potential
Research on 144 countries reveals opportunities and pitfalls of this fast-growing sector David Colgan Seafood farming in the ocean — or marine aquaculture — is the fastest growing sector of the global food system, and it shows no sign of slowing. Open-ocean farms have vast space for expansion, and consumer demand continues to rise.

Environment - Business / Economics - 22.04.2019
Climate change has worsened global economic inequality
Climate change has worsened global economic inequality
The map on the left shows countries where per capita GDP increased or decreased as a result of global warming between 1961 and 2010. The map on the right shows the same information from 1991, after economic data became available for more countries. (Image credit: Noah Diffenbaugh and Marshall Burke) The gap between the economic output of the world's richest and poorest countries is 25 percent larger today than it would have been without global warming, according to new research from Stanford University.

Social Sciences - 22.04.2019
A New Way To Learn About Learning
Aliens, video games and brain patterns provide insights into adult learning As a baby listens to her parents talk, her brain somehow sorts the sounds into specific sound categories. This happens even though mom and dad say the word "hello," slightly differently because of accents or pitch. Despite those subtle differences, a baby's brain absorbs the sounds and classifies them as equivalent.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.04.2019
Identifies why some colds cause asthma attacks in children
Upper respiratory infections remain one of the most common triggers of asthma attacks in children, but not every cold leads to a dangerous worsening of symptoms, even among children with severe asthma. The reasons for this have mostly gone unanswered for decades, but a new study led by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health provides some insight on what differentiates a cold that leads to an asthma attack from a cold that remains a cold.

Environment - Physics - 22.04.2019
Scientists climb UChicago buildings to study air quality and pollution
The bell tower of Rockefeller Memorial Chapel is normally populated by tourists and the University's carillonneur. But scientists recently scaled its 271 stone steps to the highest point on campus in order to study air quality and pollution across Chicago. At Rockefeller, researchers from UChicago and Harvard University ran a long tube down the stone tower to a humming machine, which analyzed air for methane as it blew past the tower.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.04.2019
Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation
Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation
Detailed models provide insight into 3-D structures of genes and the role of 3-D organization in gene function A Los Alamos-led team created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 22, 2019-Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model and will help researchers to better understand and develop cures for diseases like cancer.
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