« BACK

Physics/Materials Science



Results 1 - 20 of 2512.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 126 Next »

Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
25.09.2017
IceCube helps demystify strange radio bursts from deep space
IceCube is a neutrino detector composed of 5,160 optical modules embedded in a gigaton of crystal-clear ice a mile beneath the geographic South Pole. Photo courtesy of National Science Foundation For a decade, astronomers have puzzled over ephemeral but incredibly powerful radio bursts from space. The phenomena, known as fast radio bursts or FRBs, were first detected in 2007 by astronomers scouring archival data from Australia's Parkes Telescope, a 64-meter diameter dish best known for its role receiving live televison images from the Apollo 11 moon landing in 1969.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
22.09.2017
Highest-energy cosmic rays have extragalactic origin
Highest-energy cosmic rays have extragalactic origin
A 50-year-old debate has at last been settled: the highest-energy cosmic rays do not originate in our own Galaxy but in galaxies located tens or even hundreds of millions of light years away.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
21.09.2017
Fast Radio Bursts May Be Firing Off Every Second
Fast Radio Bursts May Be Firing Off Every Second
When fast radio bursts, or FRBs, were first detected in 2001, astronomers had never seen anything like them before. Since then, astronomers have found a couple of dozen FRBs, but they still don't know what causes these rapid and powerful bursts of radio emission. For the first time, two astronomers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) have estimated how many FRBs should occur over the entire observable universe.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
21.09.2017
Scientist proves theory chemists have waited two decades to understand
Groundbreaking research led by Simon Woodward,a professor of synthetic organic chemistry at the University of Nottingham, has proved how a catalyst (a small atomic-sized ‘machine' that knits together new molecules) in organo-copper chemistry works. This is one of the key approaches of modern chemistry to making larger molecules.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
21.09.2017
New analysis explains role of defects in metal oxides
New analysis explains role of defects in metal oxides
Sometimes things that are technically defects, such as imperfections in a material's crystal lattice, can actually produce changes in properties that open up new kinds of useful applications. New research from a team at MIT shows that such imperfections in a family of materials known as insulating metal oxides may be key to their performance for a variety of high-tech applications, such as nonvolatile memory chips and energy conversion technologies.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
20.09.2017
Scientists make atoms-thick Post-It notes for solar cells and circuits
Over the past half-century, scientists have shaved silicon films down to just a wisp of atoms in pursuit of smaller, faster electronics. For the next set of breakthroughs, though, they'll need novel ways to build even tinier and more powerful devices.   In a study published Sept. 20 in  Nature , UChicago and Cornell University researchers describe an innovative method to make stacks of semiconductors just a few atoms thick.
Physics/Materials Science
20.09.2017
Nanoscale printing breakthrough creates two colours per pixel
Scientists have developed a new form of high-resolution ‘printing' which could have wide-ranging applications in data storage, anti-counterfeiting measures, and digital imaging. Dr Alasdair Clark discusses plasmonic colour New research from the University of Glasgow, published today (Wednesday 20 September) in the journal Advanced Functional Materials , outlines how engineers have developed nano-scale plasmonic colour filters that display different colours depending on the orientation of the light which hits it.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
14.09.2017
Bidding farewell to Cassini mission that explored Saturn
Bidding farewell to Cassini mission that explored Saturn
"It's an extraordinarily difficult mission, but one with extraordinary rewards: giving us a glimpse into how our solar system formed and how it operates today. Watching a mission come to an end is always bittersweet, but we're proud to have been a part of something so successful that will continue to inform our understanding of our universe." Los Alamos National Laboratory played part in two major discoveries and powered the spacecraft during its 20-year flight Los Alamos, N.M., Sept.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
14.09.2017
New Study on Graphene-Wrapped Nanocrystals Makes Inroads Toward Next-Gen Fuel Cells
New Study on Graphene-Wrapped Nanocrystals Makes Inroads Toward Next-Gen Fuel Cells
Simulations and analysis at Berkeley Lab provide new atomic-scale clues to material's enhanced hydrogen storage properties A powdery mix of metal nanocrystals wrapped in single-layer sheets of carbon atoms, developed at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), shows promise for safely storing hydrogen for use with fuel cells for passenger vehicles and other uses.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
13.09.2017
In step toward 'controlling chemistry,' physicists create a new type of molecule, atom by atom
In step toward ’controlling chemistry,’ physicists create a new type of molecule, atom by atom
UCLA physicists have pioneered a method for creating a unique new molecule that could eventually have applications in medicine, food science and other fields. Their research , which also shows how chemical reactions can be studied on a microscopic scale using tools of physics, is reported . For the past 200 years, scientists have developed rules to describe chemical reactions that they've observed, including reactions in food, vitamins, medications and living organisms.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
13.09.2017
Researchers Lay Fundamental Groundwork to Better Understanding Optical Properties of Glass
Glass is everywhere. Whether someone is gazing out a window or scrolling through a smartphone, odds are that there is a layer of glass between them and whatever it is they're looking at. Despite being around for at least 5,000 years, there is still a lot that is unknown about this material, such as how certain glasses form and how they achieve certain properties.
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
13.09.2017
The Beam of Invisibility
The Beam of Invisibility
A new cloaking technology has been developed at TU Wien: a special kind of material is irradiated from above in such a way that another beam of light can pass completely uninhibited. The material is irradiated with a specially designed pattern, the wave from the left can pass through the object completely unperturbed.
Physics/Materials Science - Earth Sciences
12.09.2017
Tectonic plates ’weaker than previously thought’, say scientists
Experiments carried out at Oxford University have revealed that tectonic plates are weaker than previously thought.  The finding explains an ambiguity in lab work that led scientists to believe these rocks were much stronger than they appeared to be in the natural world. This new knowledge will help us understand how tectonic plates can break to form new boundaries.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
12.09.2017
Magnetic cellular
Magnetic cellular "Legos" for the regenerative medicine of the future
By incorporating magnetic nanoparticles in cells and developing a system using miniaturized magnets, researchers at the Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes (CNRS/Université Paris Diderot), in c
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
11.09.2017
Quantum internet a step closer with data storage breakthrough
The effort to build a quantum computer is often described as the space race of the 21st century. Our work will allow us to build a global network to connect quantum computers. Scientists at ANU have found a new way to store quantum data long enough to share the information around a next-generation internet which promises to be impervious to hacking.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
11.09.2017
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
A riddle, which has been bugging atomic physicists for more than 20 years, has been solved. The solution should help to understand the helpful effects of ionizing radiation in cancer therapy. A highly charged ion (center) passing through graphene can transfer energy to several carbon atoms simultaneously.
Earth Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
07.09.2017
Ship exhaust makes oceanic thunderstorms more intense
Ship exhaust makes oceanic thunderstorms more intense
Thunderstorms directly above two of the world's busiest shipping lanes are significantly more powerful than storms in areas of the ocean where ships don't travel, according to new University of Washington research. A new study mapping lightning around the globe finds lightning strokes occur nearly twice as often directly above heavily-trafficked shipping lanes in the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea than they do in areas of the ocean adjacent to shipping lanes that have similar climates.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
07.09.2017
New microscopy method offers one-shot 3D imaging of nanostructures
New microscopy method offers one-shot 3D imaging of nanostructures
EPFL scientists have developed a scanning transmission electron microscopy method that can quickly and efficiently generate 3D representations of curvilinear nanostructures. Image caption: Superposed, tilt-less electron microscopy stereo image (color-filtered) of carbon nanospheres decorated with nanoparticles.
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
04.09.2017
Equation reveals the characteristics of quantum chaos
Equation reveals the characteristics of quantum chaos
Researchers have now succeeded in formulating a mathematical result that provides an exact answer to the question of how chaos actually behaves. The researchers have analysed chaotic states at the atomic level. What does chaos look like in the smallest of worlds that we can imagine - inside atoms' The world in there behaves a lot differently to the world that we experience; the protons and neutrons in the nucleus are waves.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
04.09.2017
Carving diamonds for optical components
Carving diamonds for optical components
Thanks to a new technique developed at EPFL, optical diffraction gratings can now be made out of pure diamond, with their surfaces smoothed down to the very last atom. These new devices can be used to alter the wavelength of high-powered lasers or in cutting-edge spectrographs. A team of EPFL researchers has developed an unconventional way of microscopically cutting diamonds into a particular shape and smoothing them at an atomic level.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 126 Next »

 
 
Logo Careerjet