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Health - Feb 19
Simple folded sheets of waxed paper could help bring affordable, reliable field tests for diseases such as malaria to remote parts of the developing world, scientists say. In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from universities in Scotland and China, working together with the Ministry of Health in Uganda, describe for the first time how origami-style folded paper, prepared with a printer and a hot plate, has helped detect malaria with 98% sensitivity in infected participants from two primary schools in Uganda.
Health - Feb 19

Researchers at Cardiff University have used x-ray crystallography and computer simulation to get a closer look at how viruses bind cells and cause infection. The new insight could help in the development of drugs and therapies for infections and further advance the exploitation of viruses for medical treatments.

Environment - Feb 19

Today Belgian researchers set sail for Antarctica. Their goal is to take a census of marine biodiversity and to study the presence of plastic in the Southern Ocean. The mission's novelty is that it will be carried out...

Astronomy - Feb 19
Astronomy

A major new radio sky survey has revealed hundreds of thousands of previously undetected galaxies, shedding new light on many research areas including the physics of black holes and how clusters of galaxies evolve.

Environment - Feb 19

Growing meat in the laboratory may do more damage to the climate in the long run than meat from cattle, according to new research.


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Health - 15:38
"Origami" diagnostic device offers affordable malaria diagnoses
Simple folded sheets of waxed paper could help bring affordable, reliable field tests for diseases such as malaria to remote parts of the developing world, scientists say. In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from universities in Scotland and China, working together with the Ministry of Health in Uganda, describe for the first time how origami-style folded paper, prepared with a printer and a hot plate, has helped detect malaria with 98% sensitivity in infected participants from two primary schools in Uganda.

Health - Pharmacology - 15:38
Seeing the unseeable
Researchers at Cardiff University have used x-ray crystallography and computer simulation to get a closer look at how viruses bind cells and cause infection. The new insight could help in the development of drugs and therapies for infections and further advance the exploitation of viruses for medical treatments.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12:35
Astronomers detect hundreds of thousands of previously unknown galaxies
Astronomers detect hundreds of thousands of previously unknown galaxies
A major new radio sky survey has revealed hundreds of thousands of previously undetected galaxies, shedding new light on many research areas including the physics of black holes and how clusters of galaxies evolve. An international team of more than 200 astronomers from 18 countries, including researchers from the University of Oxford, has published the first phase of the survey at unprecedented sensitivity using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) telescope.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12:32
Exploring Antarctica: mapping out biodiversity and identifying the microplastics that put it in jeopardy
Today Belgian researchers set sail for Antarctica. Their goal is to take a census of marine biodiversity and to study the presence of plastic in the Southern Ocean.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 12:05
Is lab-grown meat really better for the environment?
Growing meat in the laboratory may do more damage to the climate in the long run than meat from cattle, according to new research. In a first-of-its-kind study from the LEAP (Livestock, Environment and People) programme at the Oxford Martin School, the climate-change impact of several production methods for lab-grown and farmed beef was assessed accounting for the differing greenhouse gases produced.

Health - Pharmacology - 11:35
World's first gene therapy operation for common cause of sight loss carried out
World’s first gene therapy operation for common cause of sight loss carried out
Researchers in Oxford have carried out the world's first gene therapy operation to tackle the root cause of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the UK's most common cause of sight loss. The procedure was carried out at the John Radcliffe Hospital by Professor Robert MacLaren, Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Oxford, with the support of the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre in a clinical trial sponsored by Gyroscope Therapeutics, a UK-based company developing genetically-defined therapies for the treatment of eye diseases.

Life Sciences - 08:00
Extinguishing fear memories relies on an unusual change to DNA
Researchers at The University of Queensland have discovered a DNA modification that enhances our ability to extinguish fear. The findings, published , could help guide the development of new treatments for fear-related anxiety disorders. Professor Timothy Bredy of UQ's Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) said while fear is an important survival mechanism which uses cues in the environment to prompt certain responses, so too is the ability to inhibit fear when it's no longer needed.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 18.02.2019
Rosetta's comet sculpted by stress
Rosetta’s comet sculpted by stress
Feeling stressed? You're not alone. ESA's Rosetta mission has revealed that geological stress arising from the shape of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko has been a key process in sculpting the comet's surface and interior following its formation. Small, icy comets with two distinct lobes seem to be commonplace in the Solar System, with one possible mode of formation a slow collision of two primordial objects in the early stages of formation some 4.5 billion years ago.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.02.2019
Climate change makes summer weather stormier yet more stagnant
Study finds rising temperatures feed more energy to thunderstorms, less to general circulation. Climate change is shifting the energy in the atmosphere that fuels summertime weather, which may lead to stronger thunderstorms and more stagnant conditions for midlatitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America, Europe, and Asia, a new MIT study finds.

Life Sciences - 18.02.2019
Information Bottlenecks Between Brain Areas
Most brain functions - including how people sense, reason and act - rely on interactions between brain areas. A new study published in Neuron looks at how populations of neurons interact between brain areas.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 18.02.2019
Space behaviour
Space behaviour
ESA > Our Activities > Human and Robotic Exploration > International Space Station Europe's Columbus laboratory enters its eleventh year in space with steady operations, a few upgrades and several experiments in full swing. The physical behaviour of particles, liquids and cells in microgravity was the focus of ESA's activities on the International Space Station during the first weeks of February.

Computer Science / Telecom - 18.02.2019
Robots track moving objects with unprecedented precision
Robots track moving objects with unprecedented precision
System uses RFID tags to home in on targets; could benefit robotic manufacturing, collaborative drones, and other applications. A novel system developed at MIT uses RFID tags to help robots home in on moving objects with unprecedented speed and accuracy. The system could enable greater collaboration and precision by robots working on packaging and assembly, and by swarms of drones carrying out search-and-rescue missions.

Materials Science - Environment - 18.02.2019
Lobster's underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber
Lobster’s underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber
Membrane material's properties could guide design of flexible body armor, new study suggests. Flip a lobster on its back, and you'll see that the underside of its tail is split in segments connected by a translucent membrane that appears rather vulnerable when compared with the armor-like carapace that shields the rest of the crustacean.

Astronomy / Space Science - Health - 15.02.2019
Astronaut photography benefiting the planet
Astronaut photography benefiting the planet
When astronauts take photographs of our planet while orbiting 400 km above our heads, they are doing much more than just taking pretty pictures. They are looking after the health of our planet and, ultimately, us too. Techniques used by astrophotographers looking at the stars and space exploration come together to measure the environmental impact of artificial lights at night.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.02.2019
Joshua Wallach: meta-researcher, Beatles fan, pizza connoisseur
Joshua Wallach: Meta-researcher, Beatles fan, pizza connoisseur  The Yale School of Public Health proudly welcomes a large number of new tenure track faculty joining us this academic year. These individuals have widely varied interests and excel in research, scholarship, innovation and teaching. They complement and expand the expertise already available at the School of Public Health and will be instrumental in addressing many of the health challenges of the 21 st  century.

Health - 15.02.2019
Women and health: the heart of the matter
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Physics - 15.02.2019
Sound waves let quantum systems ’talk’ to one another
Researchers at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have invented an innovative way for different types of quantum technology to "talk" to each other using sound. The study , published Feb. 11 , is an important step in bringing quantum technology closer to reality. Researchers are eyeing quantum systems, which tap the quirky behavior of the smallest particles as the key to a fundamentally new generation of atomic-scale electronics for computation and communication.

Health - 15.02.2019
What makes a man? Testosterone only half the story, scientists say
What makes a man? Testosterone only half the story, scientists say
Scientists have identified for the first time the details of an ‘alternative' biological process required to develop male genitals in an unborn baby. The findings by researchers at the universities of Aberdeen and Glasgow along with French and Swedish collaborators also sheds more light on the reasons for babies being born with undescended testes or with malformed penises.

Astronomy / Space Science - 15.02.2019
Tidal Tails - The Beginning Of The End Of An Open Star Cluster
Tidal Tails - The Beginning Of The End Of An Open Star Cluster
In the course of their life, open star clusters continuously lose stars to their surroundings. The resulting swath of tidal tails provides a glimpse into the evolution and dissolution of a star cluster. Thus far only tidal tails of massive globular clusters and dwarf galaxies have been discovered in the Milky Way system.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.02.2019
Artificial intelligence can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients
Artificial intelligence can predict survival of ovarian cancer patients
Researchers have created new machine learning software that can forecast the survival rates and response to treatments of patients with ovarian cancer The artificial intelligence software, created by researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Melbourne , has been able to predict the prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer more accurately than current methods.
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