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Pharmacology - Jun 14
Pharmacology
Urolithin A, a metabolite of biomolecules found in pomegranates and other fruits, could help slow certain aging processes. EPFL spin-off Amazentis, in conjunction with EPFL and the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, has published a paper Metabolism outlining the results of their clinical trial. It is a fact of life that skeletal muscles begin to lose strength and mass once a person reaches the age of 50.
Earth Sciences - Jun 14
Earth Sciences

An international team of scientists - including a volcanologist from the University of Bristol - have uncovered why underwater earthquakes are linked with the tides.

Environment - Jun 14

Yellowstone's migrating elk use climate cues, like melting snow and greening grasses, to decide when to make the trek from their winter ranges in prairies and valleys to their summer ranges in high mountain plateaus.

Physics - Jun 14
Physics

The successful test of the LCLS-II electron gun ( see related article ) marks the culmination of an R&D effort spanning more than a decade at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

Life Sciences - Jun 14
Life Sciences

06/14/2019 - Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process.


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Pharmacology - Health - 14.06.2019
Compound with anti-aging effects passes human trial
Compound with anti-aging effects passes human trial
Urolithin A, a metabolite of biomolecules found in pomegranates and other fruits, could help slow certain aging processes. EPFL spin-off Amazentis, in conjunction with EPFL and the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, has published a paper Metabolism outlining the results of their clinical trial. It is a fact of life that skeletal muscles begin to lose strength and mass once a person reaches the age of 50.

Earth Sciences - 14.06.2019
How tides can trigger earthquakes
How tides can trigger earthquakes
An international team of scientists - including a volcanologist from the University of Bristol - have uncovered why underwater earthquakes are linked with the tides. Their study, published , investigates the inner workings of tidally triggered earthquakes and found that even the slightest stress can set off a tremor.

Physics - 14.06.2019
Building a Better Electron Gun
Building a Better Electron Gun
The successful test of the LCLS-II electron gun ( see related article ) marks the culmination of an R&D effort spanning more than a decade at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The gun's design was conceived in 2006 by John W. Staples, a retired Berkeley Lab physicist, and Fernando Sannibale, a senior scientist in Berkeley Lab's Accelerator Technology and Applied Physics Division.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.06.2019
What drives Yellowstone’s massive elk migrations?
Yellowstone's migrating elk use climate cues, like melting snow and greening grasses, to decide when to make the trek from their winter ranges in prairies and valleys to their summer ranges in high mountain plateaus. (Joe Riis photo) Every spring, tens of thousands of elk follow a wave of green growth up onto the high plateaus in and around Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks, where they spend the summer calving and fattening on fresh grass.

Life Sciences - 14.06.2019
Exciting Plant Vacuoles
Exciting Plant Vacuoles
06/14/2019 Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. The function of this channel, which is also found in humans, has been a mystery so far. Many plant processes are not different from humans: Cells and tissues in grain plants, including maize also communicate through electrical signals.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.06.2019
Why does dandelion never fall ill?
Why does dandelion never fall ill?
Researchers at Münster University find out that dandelion possesses enzymes that have untypical abilities for plants / Study in "Angewandte Chemie' Plants possess enzymes called polyphenoloxidases, which can oxidize certain chemical compounds and thus produce the typical brown colour that we know, for example, from freshly cut apples.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.06.2019
New drug target for liver disease treatment
New drug target for liver disease treatment
A possible drug target for chronic liver disease has been identified by an international research collaboration involving a University of Queensland team. Professor Matt Sweet and Dr Divya Ramnath from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) worked with the study's senior author Dr Ekihiro Seki from Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, to identify genes linked to the progression of chronic liver disease.

Chemistry - Environment - 13.06.2019
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Chemists at EPFL have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials. The carbon dioxide (CO2) produced when fossil fuels are burned is normally released into the atmosphere. Researchers working on synthetic fuels - also known as carbon-neutral fuels - are exploring ways to capture and recycle that CO2.

Life Sciences - 13.06.2019
Modified protein can prevent Alzheimer’s disease in mice
The amyloid precursor protein has always been villainized as a major cause of Alzheimer's disease. One of its fragments, the amyloid-beta peptide, can break off and accumulate in the brain, giving rise to the puffy white globs known as senile plaques that are a hallmark of the disease. In a study published recently in the journal Cell Reports, however, researchers at the University of Chicago have redeemed APP as an unlikely hero, uncovering its extended role in brain signaling that can prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease in mice.

Health - 13.06.2019
People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices
People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices
The lives of thousands of people with mobility issues could be transformed thanks to ground-breaking research by scientists at the University of Bristol. The FREEHAB project will develop soft, wearable rehabilitative devices with a view to helping elderly and disabled people walk and move from sitting to a standing position in comfort and safety.

Health - 13.06.2019
Researchers identify genes that are key to keeping blood vessels healthy
What keeps our blood vessels viable, allowing them to do the vital work of transporting blood to and from the heart? Yale researchers have identified two genes that are central to this critical function. The research team did experiments with mice lacking the genes, known as ERK1 and ERK2, in cells lining blood vessels.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 13.06.2019
Examining how people’s emotions are influenced by others
New Stanford research on emotions shows that people's motivations are a driving factor behind how much they allow others to influence their feelings, such as anger. In a new study, Stanford psychologists examined why some people respond differently to an upsetting situation and learned that people's motivations play an important role in how they react.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 13.06.2019
Carbon-neutral fuel made from sunlight and air
Researchers from ETH Zurich have developed a novel technology that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. For the first time worldwide they demonstrate the entire thermochemical process chain under real field conditions. The new solar mini-refinery is located on the roof of ETH's Machine Laboratory building in Zurich.

Psychology - 13.06.2019
Is every type of social support helpful?
Is every type of social support helpful?
New neuroscience research suggests support-dependent modulation of responses to social exclusion Social support can change the way we perceive an unpleasant situation, but some types of support seem more effective than others. An international team of researchers led by Giorgia Silani from the Faculty of Psychology at the University of Vienna, has shown that negative feelings and brain responses are modulated by the type of social support we receive after being socially excluded.

Chemistry - 13.06.2019
Experiencing corruption makes you more likely to protest against it... up to a point
Why do some people take to the streets to protest against corruption in their society.. and others don't? Researchers from the Centre for the Study of Corruption at the University of Sussex have found that people who experience corruption first hand are more likely to protest, but only up to the point where it becomes routine.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.06.2019
Genetic inequity towards endocrine disruptors
Genetic inequity towards endocrine disruptors
By identifying the genetic causes of susceptibility to endocrine disruptors, researchers from UNIGE and the HUG highlight a fundamental inequity towards the toxicity induced by these products that are found everywhere in our environment. Phthalates, one of the most common endocrine disruptors, are commonly used by industry in many plastic products - toys, clothing, baby bottles or even medical equipment - as well as in cosmetics.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 13.06.2019
GlaxoSmithKline taps UC’s CRISPR expertise to speed drug discovery
Jennifer Doudna and Jonathan Weissman are the key players in a new collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline to apply CRISPR techniques to the discovery of new drug targets, potentially leading to new therapies for genetic diseases.

Life Sciences - Physics - 13.06.2019
DNA packaging mechanism of HSV-1, the virus that causes cold sores
A new technique developed by researchers from the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA has allowed them to become the first scientists to clearly see the intricate machinery responsible for compressing DNA into the small interior shell, or capsid, of herpes simplex virus type 1, or HSV-1, the virus responsible for causing cold sores.

Health - 13.06.2019
Three quarters of people living with axial spondyloarthritis struggle to find a job, IMAS survey shows
New European data from IMAS survey show that people living with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) suffer a delay in diagnosis of over 7 years, potentially leading to an increase in work-related issues due to worsening disease burden   The experience of people living with axSpA, a long-term inflammatory spine condition as prevalent as rheumatoid arthritis , , needs to be better understood to help patients manage their disease    The Ankylosing Spon

Life Sciences - 13.06.2019
Neurotoxins damage aquatic organisms differently than expected
Neurotoxins damage aquatic organisms differently than expected
The insecticide imidacloprid is one of the strongest insect toxins and belongs to the group of neonicotinoids. Since 2019, the use of imidacloprid, along with two other substances in this group, is only allowed in greenhouses, as this substance is one of those responsible for the death of bees. Imidacloprid is also very toxic for aquatic organisms; as is stated in the manufacturer's certification reports.
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