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Social Sciences - Apr 22
Aliens, video games and brain patterns provide insights into adult learning. As a baby listens to her parents talk, her brain somehow sorts the sounds into specific sound categories. This happens even though mom and dad say the word "hello," slightly differently because of accents or pitch. Despite those subtle differences, a baby's brain absorbs the sounds and classifies them as equivalent.
Health - Apr 22

Upper respiratory infections remain one of the most common triggers of asthma attacks in children, but not every cold leads to a dangerous worsening of symptoms, even among children with severe asthma.

Physics - Apr 22
Physics

Detailed models provide insight into 3-D structures of genes and the role of 3-D organization in gene function A Los Alamos-led team created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model.

Environment - Apr 22

The bell tower of Rockefeller Memorial Chapel is normally populated by tourists and the University's carillonneur. But scientists recently scaled its 271 stone steps to the highest point on campus in order to study air quality and pollution across Chicago.

Astronomy - Apr 22
Astronomy

22 April 2019 Incoming asteroids have been scarring our home planet for billions of years. This month humankind left our own mark on an asteroid for the first time: Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft dropped a copper projectile at very high speed in an attempt to form a crater on asteroid Ryugu.


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Social Sciences - 12:05
A New Way To Learn About Learning
Aliens, video games and brain patterns provide insights into adult learning As a baby listens to her parents talk, her brain somehow sorts the sounds into specific sound categories. This happens even though mom and dad say the word "hello," slightly differently because of accents or pitch. Despite those subtle differences, a baby's brain absorbs the sounds and classifies them as equivalent.

Health - Pharmacology - 11:32
Identifies why some colds cause asthma attacks in children
Upper respiratory infections remain one of the most common triggers of asthma attacks in children, but not every cold leads to a dangerous worsening of symptoms, even among children with severe asthma. The reasons for this have mostly gone unanswered for decades, but a new study led by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health provides some insight on what differentiates a cold that leads to an asthma attack from a cold that remains a cold.

Environment - Physics - 11:07
Scientists climb UChicago buildings to study air quality and pollution
The bell tower of Rockefeller Memorial Chapel is normally populated by tourists and the University's carillonneur. But scientists recently scaled its 271 stone steps to the highest point on campus in order to study air quality and pollution across Chicago. At Rockefeller, researchers from UChicago and Harvard University ran a long tube down the stone tower to a humming machine, which analyzed air for methane as it blew past the tower.

Physics - Chemistry - 11:05
Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation
Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation
Detailed models provide insight into 3-D structures of genes and the role of 3-D organization in gene function A Los Alamos-led team created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 22, 2019-Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model and will help researchers to better understand and develop cures for diseases like cancer.

Astronomy / Space Science - 09:33
Earth vs. asteroids: humans strike back
Earth vs. asteroids: humans strike back
22 April 2019 Incoming asteroids have been scarring our home planet for billions of years. This month humankind left our own mark on an asteroid for the first time: Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft dropped a copper projectile at very high speed in an attempt to form a crater on asteroid Ryugu. A much bigger asteroid impact is planned for the coming decade, involving an international double-spacecraft mission.

Physics - 19.04.2019
Thermodynamic Magic Enables Cooling without Energy Consumption
Thermodynamic Magic Enables Cooling without Energy Consumption
Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed an amazingly simple device that allows heat to flow temporarily from a cold to a warm object without an external power supply. Intriguingly, the process initially appears to contradict the fundamental laws of physics. If you put a teapot of boiling water on the kitchen table, it will gradually cool down.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.04.2019
American Academy of Arts and Sciences Elects Four Berkeley Lab Scientists
From left to right: Susan Hubbard, Kam-Biu Luk, Jeffrey Long, and Claire Tomlin. (Credit: Berkeley Lab/UC Berkeley) Four scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a prestigious, 239-year old honorary society that recognizes accomplished scholars, scientists and artists in academia, the humanities, arts, business, and government.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.04.2019
Innovative drug delivery improves effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy
Even after decades of research, cancer remains difficult to treat, in part because of its ability to evade the body's natural defenses found in the immune system. Immunotherapy, which stimulates the body's immune system to find and attack cancer and other diseases, has offered a new avenue for treatment.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.04.2019
When psychiatric medications are abruptly discontinued, withdrawal symptoms may be mistaken for relapse
Withdrawal symptoms following the practice of discontinuation, or abruptly “coming off,” of psychiatric drugs in randomized clinical trials may be mistaken for relapse and bolster the case for continued use of medication, according to two new studies by UCLA researchers published in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics.

Health - Materials Science - 19.04.2019
Possible blood test for colon cancer
Up to half of people who should be screened for colorectal cancer do not get the routine procedure. A blood test to detect colorectal cancer being developed by Stanford doctors and materials scientists could help change that. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. and a growing problem around the world, but not because it's a particularly difficult cancer to detect and halt.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to lower brain connectivity
More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior.   The study appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.04.2019
Genetic defect causing intellectual disability discovered by Sussex scientists
Researchers at the University of Sussex have discovered a new genetic defect which causes a form of intellectual disability; a finding that will improve screening programmes and help to end a ‘diagnostic odyssey' for families across the globe. ‘X-linked syndromal intellectual disability' (XLID) affects around 3% of the global population with underlying genetic mutations being carried and passed on by unaffected females via their X-chromosome (human females possess two copies of the X chromosome, while males only have one).

Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
Taming the genome's
Taming the genome's "jumping" sequences
EPFL scientists have discovered how a family of proteins that regulates the activity of transposable elements in the genome allows them to make inheritable changes to the growing fetus. The human genome is fascinating. Once predicted to contain about a hundred thousand protein-coding genes, it now seems that the number is closer to twenty thousand, and maybe less.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.04.2019
Usurp the Burp
How seaweed could help curb cow burps—one of California's greatest sources of methane emissions Marine ecologist Jennifer Smith has been cultivating Asparagopsis taxiformis seaweed in her lab at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Researchers have found that adding small amounts of this seaweed to cattle feed can dramatically reduce methane-laden cow burps.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.04.2019
Next frontier in study of gut bacteria: mining microbial molecules
The human gut harbors trillions of invisible microbial inhabitants, referred to as the microbiota, that collectively produce thousands of unique small molecules. The sources and biological functions of the vast majority of these molecules are unknown. Yale researchers recently applied a new technology to uncover microbiota-derived chemicals that affect human physiology, revealing a complex network of interactions with potentially broad-reaching impacts on human health.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.04.2019
Team proposes plan to use bioinformatics, open data to boost science in developing countries
Team proposes plan to use bioinformatics, open data to boost science in developing countries
UCLA computer scientists and their collaborators have devised a plan for the use of cloud computing and big data analysis to allow scientists in developing countries to jumpstart bioinformatics research programs. Bioinformatics is the computational analysis of biological data. Research in this emerging area has broad applications for diagnosing and treating diseases and preventing their spread; and in developing public health strategies and new drugs.

Earth Sciences - 18.04.2019
Data mining digs up hidden clues to major California earthquake triggers
Data mining digs up hidden clues to major California earthquake triggers
Comprehensive new earthquake catalog includes 10 times more quakes than previously identified, with a more detailed picture of stresses and structures in the earth A historic image of quake damage in Long Beach, California, 1933. CREDIT: W.L. Huber, USGS (Public domain) It's very difficult to unpack what triggers larger earthquakes because they are infrequent, but with this new information about a huge number of small earthquakes, we can see how stress evolves in fault systems.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
Microbiomes of diabetic foot ulcers are associated with clinical outcomes
MADISON - New research suggests that the microbial communities associated with chronic wounds common in diabetic patients affect whether those wounds heal or lead to amputations. Work led by University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Professor of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Lindsay Kalan and her colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania found that particular strains of the common pathogen Staphylococcus aureus exclusively infected diabetic foot ulcers that never healed, indicating these strains may delay healing.

Physics - Materials Science - 18.04.2019
Electric Skyrmions Charge Ahead for Next-Generation Data Storage
Electric Skyrmions Charge Ahead for Next-Generation Data Storage
Berkeley Lab-led research team makes a chiral skyrmion crystal with electric properties; puts new spin on future information storage applications VIDEO: Simulation of a single polar skyrmion. Red arrows signify that this is a left-handed skyrmion. The other arrows represent the angular distribution of the dipoles.

Astronomy / Space Science - 18.04.2019
New satellite data sets reveal flood risk for vulnerable populations
Scientists from the University of Bristol have modelled the likelihood of flooding in some of the world's most hazardous zones to an unparalleled degree of accuracy. Their insights could help people and governments better protect themselves against risk and flood losses. As reported today (Thursday 18 April), experts in flood risk and environmental uncertainty analysed detailed hazard maps of 18 countries across Latin America, Asia and Africa against data developed by Facebook's Connectivity Labs detailing population density in those countries.
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