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Results 41 - 60 of 1789.


Astronomy / Space Science - Innovation / Technology - 20.03.2019
Taking gravity from strength to strength
Ten years ago, ESA launched one of its most innovative satellites. GOCE spent four years measuring a fundamental force of nature: gravity. This extraordinary mission not only yielded new insights into our gravity field, but led to some amazing discoveries about our planet, from deep below the surface to high up in the atmosphere and beyond.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.03.2019
How our body «listens» to vibrations
How our body «listens» to vibrations
UNIGE researchers show that, for the brain, sounds and vibrations are ultimately quite similar. This would explain why vibrations are sometimes as unpleasant as noise pollution. We all know the feeling of a mobile phone vibrating in our hands when announcing an incoming call. If we perceive these vibrations so clearly, it is due to specialized receptors that transduce them into neural signals sent to our brain.

Physics - Environment - 20.03.2019
Precision work for large molecules
Precision work for large molecules
Quantum cascade lasers are able to measure the smallest molecules with high precision. But the technology has failed to measure larger gas molecules - until now! Empa researchers have succeeded in quantifying ethanol, an important organic molecule, with the aid of such a laser. In collaboration with the Swiss Federal Institute of Metrology (METAS), a team of researchers has successfully developed a method for determining the concentration of ethanol in a gas mixture with a very high proportion of water vapour and carbon dioxide.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.03.2019
Protein BRCA1 as a Stress Coach
Protein BRCA1 as a Stress Coach
03/20/2019 Two proteins work hand in hand to ensure that the tumour cells of neuroblastoma can grow at full speed. In "Nature", a Würzburg research team shows how the proteins can do this. Anyone who has ever studied the molecular basis of breast cancer will probably have heard of the abbreviation BRCA1 - this is a protein that protects the cells of breast tissue against cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.03.2019
Reshapes Understanding of How the Brain Recovers from Injury
Researchers to incorporate data into new, open access platform for exploration of the human brain New research, which appears in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B , sheds light on how the damage in the brain caused by a stroke can lead to permanent vision impairment for approximately 265,000 Americans each year.

Life Sciences - 19.03.2019
Starving bacteria can eject their tails to save energy and stay alive
When nutrients are dangerously low, a group of bacteria have been found to take the drastic measure of getting rid of their tails. Some bacteria use tails, or flagella, to swim through liquids - including those in our bodies. However, new research published today in PLOS Biology reveals a surprisingly drastic measure taken by some bacteria when facing starvation: they eject their flagella, leaving themselves paralyzed, but conserving energy so they can stay alive.

Health - Environment - 19.03.2019
Managed retreat due to rising seas is a public health issue
Sea-level rise associated with climate change is a concern for many island and coastal communities. While the dangers may seem far off for large coastal cities like Miami or New Orleans, the advancing oceans are already displacing some small indigenous communities, and many others are at risk around the world.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.03.2019
A Pioneer in Ultrasensitive Particle Detectors
A Pioneer in Ultrasensitive Particle Detectors
Berkeley Lab's Alan Smith drove the science of measuring radioactivity in experiments' materials and components Note: This article was adapted from an article originally published by the Sanford Underground Research Facility. View the original article. In 1953, Alan "Al" Smith arrived for his first day of work at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 19.03.2019
Public-sector research boosts cleantech start-ups
Cleantech start-ups in the USA that cooperate with government research agencies outperform their competitors both in terms of patents and funding. That is the conclusion of a study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the University of Maryland and the University of Cambridge. In the cleantech sector, where development processes can extend over many years, public-private partnerships could prove valuable in other countries, too.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.03.2019
What’s controlling chameleon-like abilities in squid
In the blink of an eye, a squid's "smart skin" can switch color and pattern for the purpose of camouflage or sexual signaling-a virtuosic display that has long fascinated scientists. Now, scientists from the UChicago-affiliated Marine Biological Laboratory  and from  Northeastern University  report a paradigm-shifting discovery in how specialized organs in squid skin, called chromatophores, contribute to the feat via an elegant interplay of pigmentary action and structural coloration.

Materials Science - 19.03.2019
Deliberate Short Circuits and Nail Torture as a Means of Enhancing Security: Battery research
Deliberate Short Circuits and Nail Torture as a Means of Enhancing Security: Battery research
Most of the people who stroll across the Leonardo campus are unlikely to notice a narrow, single-storey building. The construction in question is about 25 metres long and five metres wide. It is adorned with red and white stripes, has a corrugated iron roof, and is surrounded by a wire mesh fence which is about 1.5 metres high.

Life Sciences - 19.03.2019
Have microscope, will travel: New tech project links Madison, Boston scientists
An invention designed to transform how and where high-powered research microscopes are deployed - and who gets to use them - will make its way from Madison this spring to the fertile biology labs of greater Boston. A portable, shareable scientific microscope nicknamed Flamingo, created in 2018 by imaging pioneer Jan Huisken of the Morgridge Institute for Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will make its cross-country journey thanks to support announced today by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI).

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.03.2019
A distinct form of epigenetic memory
A distinct form of epigenetic memory
Epigenetic memory of transcriptional gene silencing has been observed in several organisms. However, it was not known whether mechanisms exist that convey transgenerational memory of a silencing “experience”, without silencing the gene permanently. The Bühler group has now found such a phenomenon in a unicellular organism.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 19.03.2019
Bright Skies for Plant-Based Jet Fuels
Joint BioEnergy Institute researchers demonstrate that jet fuels made from plants could be cost competitive with conventional fossil fuels With an estimated daily fuel demand of more than 5 million barrels per day, the global aviation sector is incredibly energy-intensive and almost entirely reliant on petroleum-based fuels.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.03.2019
New test method: Simulating in vitro what happens with proteins in vivo
New test method: Simulating in vitro what happens with proteins in vivo
Take protein - for instance, in the form of skimmed-milk powder - and put a pinch of it in a test tube. To determine how efficiently this dietary protein is converted into endogenous protein, follow the recipe described in the online science step-by-step in the laboratory. And voilà, the value of the protein, i.e. its benefit for humans, is revealed.

Environment - 19.03.2019
Researchers Look at Sentiment Toward Air Pollution in China
China's rapid economic development in recent years has made it one of the world's largest emitters of carbon dioxide. The air pollution is staggering, and recent studies estimate that it was responsible for anywhere from 900,000 to 1.2 million deaths in 2013, making it one of China's largest mortality risk factors.

Life Sciences - 19.03.2019
Evolutionary nightmare: Parasites pass on their manipulatory characteristics
Evolutionary nightmare: Parasites pass on their manipulatory characteristics
In order to move from one host to another, certain parasites change their behaviour. The more effectively a parasite can manipulate its host, the greater its evolutionary advantage. It therefore passes on its characteristics to its descendants, as a new Eawag study has shown. Many parasites move from host to host several times during their life cycle, including the parasitic tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus , which infects three hosts altogether.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.03.2019
Zika study may ’supercharge’ vaccine research
Scientists looking at the genetics of Zika virus have found a way to fast-track research which could lead to new vaccines. The study, led by The University of Queensland and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute , used a new technique to uncover Zika mutations that help foster virus replication in mosquito hosts, while hindering its ability to replicate in mammals.

Environment - Civil Engineering - 19.03.2019
What is on the ground in a city linked inequality in life satisfaction
Cities which have a balance between facilities, housing and natural green spaces have lower levels of socio-economic inequality in the life satisfaction of its residents, according to new research. ‌ In a European-wide study, led by the University of Glasgow MRC/CSO Social & Public Health Sciences Unit and published today in Social Science & Medicine, scientists found links between urban design and levels of inequality in life satisfaction.

Health - 19.03.2019
Finds that long-serving veterans live longer
Veterans with a long period of service in the Armed Forces have a reduced risk of early death, according to a study by the University of Glasgow. People who spend longer in employment are generally at lower risk of early death (the ‘healthy worker effect'), but few studies have looked at whether this holds good for military service.