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Results 41 - 60 of 1656.


Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 17.05.2019
Mission control 'saves science'
Mission control ’saves science’
17 May 2019 Every minute, ESA's Earth observation satellites gather dozens of gigabytes of data about our planet - enough information to fill the pages on a 100-metre long bookshelf. Flying in low-Earth orbits, these spacecraft are continuously taking the pulse of our planet, but it's teams on the ground at ESA's Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, that keep these explorers afloat.

Health - 17.05.2019
New Findings on Malaria Vaccine
New Findings on Malaria Vaccine
Protection by the malaria vaccine RTS,S is not only a matter of antibody quantity but also of quality. These are the findings of a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) in collaboration with Swiss TPH and other partners. The research show for the first time that the higher the avidity of antibodies induced by the RTS,S vaccine, the greater the protection.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.05.2019
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms, new research suggests An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research published this week. Brain aneurysms are a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall.

History / Archeology - Computer Science / Telecom - 17.05.2019
Historian Prof. Torsten Hiltmann aims to make use of machine learning for medieval research
Historian Prof. Torsten Hiltmann aims to make use of machine learning for medieval research
Centuries-old manuscripts, documents and heraldic images: at first glance, medieval research and artificial intelligence seem to be a contradiction in terms. After all, historical studies and the like were long seen as being subjects greatly removed from the world of IT. However, methods such as machine learning on the part of computer programmes, which learn new things and correct themselves, open up new opportunities for historians doing research.

Life Sciences - 17.05.2019
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
International research finds bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex Bedbugs - some of the most unwanted human bedfellows - have been parasitic companions with other species asides from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

Media - 17.05.2019
Understanding journalists and what they do
Photo credit: Lucía Vergara and Article 19-Mexico City, Mexico Photo credit: Lucía Vergara and Article 19-Mexico City, Mexico Researchers from 16 Latin American and Caribbean countries, hosted by the Institute for the Advanced Study of the Americas, will share information on the challenges journalists face and their contributions to society.

Palaeontology - 17.05.2019
A high-heeled dinosaur?
A high-heeled dinosaur?
A 24-tonne dinosaur may have walked in a ‘high-heeled' fashion, according to University of Queensland research. UQ PhD candidate Andréas Jannel and colleagues from UQ's Dinosaur Lab analysed fossils of Australia's only named Jurassic sauropod, Rhoetosaurus brownei, to better understand how such an enormous creature could support its own body weight.

Physics - 17.05.2019
Scientists 'paint' Mona Lisa on a quantum canvas
Scientists ’paint’ Mona Lisa on a quantum canvas
The Mona Lisa, Van Gogh's Starry Night and dozens of other images have been recreated on a quantum ‘canvas' the width of a human hair, thanks to University of Queensland physicists. The images were projected and photographed on a blob of gaseous quantum matter known as Bose-Einstein condensate.

Social Sciences - 16.05.2019
Prison time has little or no bearing on long-term public safety
Imprisonment has virtually no effect on violent crime rates, new study finds. (Cartoon by J.D. Crowe/Press Register) Locking away people who have committed assault, robbery and similar felonies may keep them off the streets for a period of time, but it does not affect whether they will commit violent crimes after their release, according to new research from UC Berkeley.

Environment - 16.05.2019
A quarter of glacier ice in West Antarctica is now unstable
A quarter of glacier ice in West Antarctica is now unstable
16 May 2019 By combining 25 years of ESA satellite data, scientists have discovered that warming ocean waters have caused the ice to thin so rapidly that 24% of the glacier ice in West Antarctica is now affected. A paper published in Geophysical Research Letters describes how the UK Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) used over 800 million measurements of Antarctic ice sheet height recorded by radar altimeter instruments on ESA's ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat and CryoSat satellite missions between 1992 and 2017.

Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
The insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain
The insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain
Neuroscientists at EPFL have discovered an area of the brain, the insular cortex, that processes painful experiences and thereby drives learning from aversive events. Acute pain, e.g. hitting your leg against a sharp object, causes an abrupt, unpleasant feeling. In this way, we learn from painful experiences to avoid future harmful situations.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.05.2019
’Smart’ insulin could prevent hypoglycemia during diabetes treatment
UCLA bioengineers and their colleagues have developed a new type of insulin that could help prevent hypoglycemia in people who use the drug to manage diabetes. The treatment is being evaluated for potential clinical trials and, if successful, could change diabetes care. The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Reveals role of neonatal brain cells in early bonding in mammals
What drives the social bond between offspring and caregivers in the first few days of life? A Yale-led team of researchers has found clues in specific neurons in the brains of neonatal mice that are associated with feeding. The neurons, known as Agrp, regulate feeding behavior in adult mammals, but it was not clear what role they played in early development.

Environment - 16.05.2019
The air we breathe
The air we breathe
16 May 2019 Air pollution is a global environmental health problem, especially for those living in urban areas. Not only does it negatively impact our ecosystems, it considerably affects our health. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), around 8 million premature deaths per year are linked to air pollution, more than double of previous estimates.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation's Lifesavers'
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation’s Lifesavers’
A University of Bristol researcher who discovered that cooling babies who have suffered a lack of oxygen at birth improves their survival without brain damage in later childhood, is named by Universities UK as one of the 'Nation's Lifesavers'. One in 1,000 babies born at full term in the UK suffer brain injury as a result of being severely deprived of oxygen.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 16.05.2019
Reveals what was on the menu for medieval peasants
Scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered, for the first time, definitive evidence that determines what types of food medieval peasants ate and how they managed their animals. Using chemical analysis of pottery fragments and animal bones found at one of England's earliest medieval villages, combined with detailed examination of a range of historical documents and accounts, the research has revealed the daily diet of peasants in the Middle Ages.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
UC San Diego Ranked Ninth in World in Biomedical Sciences
Nature Index also cited UC San Diego sixth among US academic institutions and UC San Diego Health Sciences seventh among health care institutions in 2019 In its first-ever assessment of biomedical institutions around the world, based upon published research in a targeted set of high-quality scientific journals, the 2019 Nature Index ranked University of California San Diego ninth among the top 200 institutions in biomedical sciences worldwide.

Innovation / Technology - 16.05.2019
Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'
Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as ’creepy’
Many parents express concerns about privacy and online safety in technology designed for their children. But we know much less about what children themselves find concerning in emerging technologies. Now University of Washington researchers have defined for the first time what children mean when they say technology is "creepy.” Kids in a new study described creepy technology as something that is unpredictable or poses an ambiguous threat that might cause physical harm or threaten an important relationship.

Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Breakthrough Technique for Studying Gene Expression Takes Root in Plants
Berkeley Lab scientists adapt open-source genetic analysis method for use in plant cells for the first time Researcher Christine Shulse tends to Arabidopsis plants in a lab at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI). (Photo credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab) An open-source RNA analysis platform has been successfully used on plant cells for the first time - an advance that could herald a new era of fundamental research and bolster efforts to engineer more efficient food and biofuel crop plants.

Health - Transport - 16.05.2019
Particles from aircraft engines affect airways
Particles from aircraft engines affect airways
In a unique experimental setup, Swiss researchers have investigated the effect of exhaust particles from aircraft turbine engines on human lung cells. The cells reacted most strongly to particles emitted during ground idling. The study also showed that the cytotoxic effect is only to some extent comparable to that of particles from gasoline and diesel engines.