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Music - Psychology - 26.01.2024
Listening to music after stress: ’Genre doesn’t matter’
Feeling stressed? "Take Me Home, Country Roads", "Nothing Else Matters" or "Baby One More Time" might calm you down again. Psychologist and music scientist Krisna Adiasto discovered that music genre doesn't seem to play a role in the songs we choose to recover from stress, but the songs that work do have shared characteristics.

Health - Psychology - 21.01.2024
Measuring Stress
In the latest of a series of innovative designs for wearable sensors that use sweat to identify and measure physiological conditions, Caltech's Wei Gao, assistant professor of medical engineering, has devised an "electronic skin" that continuously monitors nine different markers that characterize a stress response.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 19.01.2024
How Does Materialism in Social Media Trigger Stress and Unhappiness?
How Does Materialism in Social Media Trigger Stress and Unhappiness?
You won't find another place that makes it as easy to compare yourself with others as social media. That's not good for you. Clothes, cars, travel, followers: People with a materialistic mindset always want more and, above all, more than others. Social media provides them with ideal opportunities to compare themselves with others, which makes them susceptible to passive and addictive user behavior.

Health - Psychology - 19.01.2024
Expert insight: Excessive social media use worsened adolescent mental health during COVID-19
Expert insight: Excessive social media use worsened adolescent mental health during COVID-19
Lockdowns and lack of support networks left youth more vulnerable to the negative effects of social media How does time spent online, and especially social media, affect the brains and behaviours of children and youth? Social media platforms are seemingly designed to capture the attention of users and produce habitual checking of apps and notifications.

Pharmacology - Psychology - 16.01.2024
Coming off antidepressants can trigger emotional and social difficulties alongside physical symptoms
Coming off antidepressants can trigger emotional and social difficulties alongside physical symptoms
New research from the Dept of Psychology looked at physical and emotional withdrawal symptoms experienced by people taking antidepressants. Published on Tuesday 16 January 2024 Last updated on Tuesday 16 January 2024 Coming off antidepressants is known to trigger physical symptoms, such as restlessness, fatigue and excessive sweating, but new research suggests people can also experience emotional and social difficulties, and changes in their thinking patterns when they stop taking antidepressants like Prozac.

Psychology - Pharmacology - 12.01.2024
Psychotherapy effective in treating post-traumatic stress disorder following multiple traumatic events: International meta-study
Psychotherapy effective in treating post-traumatic stress disorder following multiple traumatic events International meta-study: Team led by researchers from the University of Münster reports encouraging results for patients and therapists Psychotherapy is an effective treatment for adults with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following exposure to multiple traumatic events.

Psychology - Health - 11.01.2024
Early childhood irritability and tantrums linked to future depression and self-harm
Children whose irritability does not reduce between three and seven years are at higher risk of depression and self-harm as teenagers, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The new findings, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ( JAACAP ), suggest that interventions helping parents and caregivers to support children with high irritability could help to reduce the future risk of mental illness.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 11.01.2024
Newly identified genes for depression may lead to new treatments
More than 200 genes linked to depression have been newly identified in a worldwide study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in Nature Genetics , found more than 50 new genetic loci (a locus is a specific position on a chromosome) and 205 novel genes that are associated with depression, in the first large-scale global study of the genetics of major depression in participants of diverse ancestry groups.

Psychology - 11.01.2024
New model creates understanding of birth control pills on risk, resilience to depression
Study: A mouse model of oral contraceptive exposure: Depression, motivation, and the stress response While birth control hormones given to mice result in lower stress levels, the mice showed normal corticosterone responses to stress when given newer formulations of the pill, according to a new University of Michigan study.

Health - Psychology - 11.01.2024
Prevalence of mental health conditions in young male offenders revealed
A new study looking at the mental health of young male prisoners has found that more than 85% had a current mental health condition, however less than 3% had received a clinical assessment (i.e. a comprehensive assessment of mental health and neurodevelopment) while in prison A new study looking at the mental health of young male prisoners has found that more than 85% had a current mental health condition, however less than 3% had received a clinical assessment (i.e.

Health - Psychology - 10.01.2024
Feeling depressed linked to short-term increase in bodyweight among people with overweight or obesity
Feeling depressed linked to short-term increase in bodyweight among people with overweight or obesity
Increases in symptoms of depression are associated with a subsequent increase in bodyweight when measured one month later, new research from the University of Cambridge has found. The study, published today in PLOS ONE , found that the increase was only seen among people with overweight or obesity, but found no link between generally having greater symptoms of depression and higher bodyweight.

Health - Psychology - 10.01.2024
Therapy against spider fear can also reduce fear of heights
Therapy against spider fear can also reduce fear of heights
It has long been assumed that it is necessary to use different exposure therapies to treat different fears. A new study from Bochum challenges this view. Exposure therapy for a specific fear can also help reduce other fears. This is the conclusion reached by psychologists at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, who studied 50 people with a fear of spiders and heights.

Psychology - 09.01.2024
PhD students' mental health is poor and the pandemic made it worse
PhD students’ mental health is poor and the pandemic made it worse
Dr. Angela Aristidou (UCL School of Management) highlights the mental health impact of the pandemic on PhD students and the coping mechanisms that can help in The Conversation. A pre-pandemic study  on PhD students' mental health showed that they often struggle with such issues. Financial insecurity and  feelings of isolation  can be among the factors affecting students' wellbeing.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 05.01.2024
How memories are formed in the brain - a new role for the internal compass
How memories are formed in the brain - a new role for the internal compass
Since their discovery in the 1990s, the head-direction cells in the brain have been referred to as its "internal compass." These cells are activated when the head of an animal or human points in a certain direction, and are thought to be important for spatial orientation and navigation. Now a team of neuroscientists at the University of Tübingen has discovered that head-direction cells in mice do more than this.

Psychology - 04.01.2024
Chicken whisperers: humans crack the clucking code
A University of Queensland-led study has found humans can tell if chickens are excited or displeased, just by the sound of their clucks. Professor Joerg Henning from UQ's School of Veterinary Science said researchers investigated whether humans could correctly identify the context of calls or clucking sounds made by domestic chickens, the most commonly farmed species in the world.

Psychology - 02.01.2024
Combine mindfulness with exercise for mental health boost in 2024 - study
New research shows how combining mindfulness with exercise boosts people's mental health and wellbeing and could help change exercise habits. Published on Tuesday 2 January 2024 Last updated on Wednesday 3 January 2024 For people looking to start 2024 with a new routine to feel fitter and happier, a new study from the University of Bath suggests that combining mindfulness with exercise could be your key to success.

Psychology - Health - 27.12.2023
Artificial intelligence as therapeutic support
Artificial intelligence as therapeutic support
Artificial intelligence (AI) can reliably detect emotions based on facial expressions in psychotherapeutic situations. These are the findings of a feasibility study by researchers from the Faculty of Psychology and the University Psychiatric Clinics (UPK) at the University of Basel. The AI system is also able to reliably predict therapeutic success in patients with borderline personality pathology.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 21.12.2023
Non-abusive 'red flags' that predict intimate partner violence
Non-abusive ’red flags’ that predict intimate partner violence
Researchers from Western say it's rare for someone to go on a first date and experience intimate partner violence immediately. It takes time and during that time, people become more committed to their partner. As the relationship progresses, tangible and intangible elements of a relationship like moving in together, getting married or falling in love can make it more difficult to leave.

Health - Psychology - 20.12.2023
Emotional problems in young people were rising rapidly even before the pandemic
There was a substantial increase in emotional problems among young people in Wales in the years immediately before the pandemic, research from Cardiff University shows. Published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, academics studied data collected from more than 200,000 young people aged 11-16 in Wales.

Health - Psychology - 18.12.2023
Child and adolescent psychiatry: fewer coercive measures thanks to architectural changes
Child and adolescent psychiatry: fewer coercive measures thanks to architectural changes
Coercive measures are used in psychiatric treatment to avert acute danger to a person's life and health. However, such measures can be associated with considerable risks for patients and treatment teams. It is known from studies in adult psychiatric inpatient wards that environmental factors such as staffing, availability of retreat options, privacy and access to natural light can influence the use of coercive measures.