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Results 61 - 80 of 1451.


Health - Psychology - 24.08.2022
Breaking stereotype: Brain models are not one-size-fits-all
Machine learning has helped scientists understand how the brain gives rise to complex human characteristics, uncovering patterns of brain activity that are related to behaviors like working memory, traits like impulsivity, and disorders like depression. And with these tools, scientists can create models of these relationships that can then be used, in theory, to make predictions about the behavior and health of individuals.

Psychology - Computer Science - 23.08.2022
Show me your Twitter feed and I’ll tell you what your problem is
Data scientist Marijn ten Thij studies human behaviour on the basis of messages posted on social media. For example, he mapped the changing mood during the corona pandemic using 3.5 million tweets. The analysis of this kind of data is not only socially relevant, it could also help individuals in psychological distress.

Psychology - Health - 23.08.2022
Laat me je Twitterfeed zien en ik vertel je wat je probleem is
Data scientist Marijn ten Thij studies human behaviour on the basis of messages posted on social media. For example, he mapped the changing mood during the corona pandemic using 3.5 million tweets. The analysis of this kind of data is not only socially relevant, it could also help individuals in psychological distress.

Psychology - 22.08.2022
Autism diagnosis impacted by men and women’s different emotional needs
A new study suggests that autism diagnosis could be improved with a greater focus on the differences in emotional needs between women and men. A new study published by a team of psychologists suggests that the diagnosis of autism could be improved by considering the differences between how women and men experience and act upon their emotions.

Health - Psychology - 18.08.2022
Increased risk of some neurological and psychiatric disorders remains two years after COVID-19 infection
New diagnoses of disorders including psychosis, dementia, seizures and 'brain fog' remain commoner two years after COVID-19 than after other respiratory infections, whereas the increased risks of depression and anxiety after COVID-19 are short-lived and there is no overall excess of cases.

Psychology - Health - 18.08.2022
'Concerning' findings emphasise importance of depression screening
’Concerning’ findings emphasise importance of depression screening
University of Queensland researchers are calling for screening of perinatal depression (PND) for all women during pregnancy, after finding women with persistent depression are at high risk of developing the condition. PhD candidate Dr Jacqueline Kiewa from UQ's Child Health Research Centre compared the perinatal experiences of women with lifetime major depression and found almost three quarters of them had at least one episode of PND.

Psychology - 18.08.2022
Working too hard? New SFU research highlights importance of taking breaks
Work breaks should be seen as recovery opportunities that foster employee well-being and do not detract from performance, according to a Simon Fraser University researcher. Zhanna Lyubykh, assistant professor, Management and Organization Studies at the Beedie School of Business led a systematic review of 83 studies focused on the role of work breaks in fostering well-being and performance.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 17.08.2022
Does language acquisition begin before birth?
Does language acquisition begin before birth?
A research team supervised by Anne Gallagher is investigating whether babies can learn language in the womb. Does exposing babies to different languages during pregnancy promote the acquisition of language skills before birth? This is what a research team at the LION laboratory is trying to determine.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 15.08.2022
Connection between a ’calm mind’ and better capacity for self-control
People's self-control can be seen in the stability of their neuronal processes People who have a "calmer mind" - that is, their neuronal processes take longer on average and whirl around less than others - have greater self-control. This was the finding of Dr. Tobias Kleinert, Markus Heinrichs and Dr. Bastian Schiller from the Department of Psychology at the University of Freiburg, together with Kyle Nash and Dr. Josh Leota from the University of Alberta/Canada, and Thomas König from the University Hospital of Bern/Switzerland.

Psychology - Health - 12.08.2022
AI could help patients with chronic pain avoid opioids
Study: Patient-Centered Pain Care Using Artificial Intelligence and Mobile Health Tools Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective alternative to opioid painkillers for managing chronic pain. But getting patients to complete those programs is challenging, especially because psychotherapy often requires multiple sessions and mental health specialists are scarce.

Health - Psychology - 04.08.2022
Covid-19 restrictions not directly linked to levels of distress in England
Covid-19 restrictions not directly linked to levels of distress in England
People in England continued to experience high levels of psychological distress even after all legal Covid restrictions ended in February 2022, finds a new study led by researchers from UCL and King's College London. The findings, part of the Covid-19 Rapid Survey of Adherence to Interventions and Responses (CORSAIR) study, were published in Journal of Psychiatric Research and examined data collected from online surveys of over 41,000 participants over the age of 16 years between April 2020 until April 2022.

Health - Psychology - 02.08.2022
Behavioral intervention reduces depression, anxiety in adults with obesity 
Behavioral intervention reduces depression, anxiety in adults with obesity 
Results from a pilot clinical trial show that among a racially and ethnically diverse cohort of adults who were obese and depressed, an integrated behavioral intervention was more effective than usual care at reducing depression and associated anxiety symptoms than it was at promoting weight loss. Using functional brain imaging, the University of Illinois Chicago researchers who led the study also found that among those participating in the intervention, neural processes involved in cognitive control changed and were predictive of anxiety symptom reductions.

Health - Psychology - 01.08.2022
COVID-19 can be less stressful for the LGBTQ+
Researchers at Université de Montréal find that social support among LGBTQ+ community members - sometimes called "chosen families" - can help them better cope psychologically with the pandemic. For lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) people, the COVID-19 pandemic has brought a lot of inequities faced by their community to the fore, including the precarious state of their mental health.

Psychology - 28.07.2022
Half of all Australians will be victims of technology-facilitated abuse
One in two Australians will be victims of technology-facilitated abuse in their lifetimes, and one in four will be perpetrators of such abuse, new research led by Monash University has revealed. In the first ever nationally representative survey of both Australian adult victim-survivors and perpetrators, researchers from Monash and RMIT universities also found technology-facilitated abuse was experienced at higher levels for LGBTIQA+ people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and those with disability.

Psychology - Health - 26.07.2022
Feeling addicted to food? Your parents’ drinking habits may impact your risk
People with a parent with a history of alcohol problems are at greater risk for showing signs of addiction to highly processed foods, a new University of Michigan study found. These foods, such as ice cream, chocolate, pizza and fries, contain unnaturally high amounts of refined carbohydrates and fats that may trigger an addictive response in some people.

Psychology - Health - 25.07.2022
High-strength cannabis linked to addiction and mental health problems
Largest ever study into the health effects of different types of cannabis highlights concerns about stronger forms of the drug. As the strength or potency of cannabis products has increased internationally over the years, so have rates of people being treated for cannabis addiction, say the authors of a new study.

Psychology - Health - 20.07.2022
No evidence that depression is caused by low serotonin levels, finds comprehensive review
After decades of study, there remains no clear evidence that serotonin levels or serotonin activity are responsible for depression, according to a major review of prior research led by UCL scientists. The new umbrella review - an overview of existing meta-analyses and systematic reviews - published in Molecular Psychiatry , suggests that depression is not likely caused by a chemical imbalance, and calls into question what antidepressants do.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 20.07.2022
No pain, no gain? How the brain chooses between pain and profit
No pain, no gain? How the brain chooses between pain and profit
Imagine having to choose over and over between what you enjoy doing and the pain that it might cause you, whether physical or emotional. If you live with conditions such as depression, anxiety, or chronic pain, you are probably familiar with making these difficult choices on a daily or weekly basis. But surprisingly little is known about which areas of the brain are involved in decisions of this kind.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 19.07.2022
Questioning the universal application of neurocognitive tests
Human interactions are enabled by a set of neurocognitive mechanisms defined by the notion of social cognition. In order to detect patients with social cognition disorders, specialists use internationally validated evaluation tests. However, most of these tests have been developed in industrialized Western countries, which raises questions about the relevance of generalizing them to the whole of humanity.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 19.07.2022
Questioning the Universal Application of Neurocognitive Tests
Questioning the Universal Application of Neurocognitive Tests
Human interactions are enabled by a set of neurocognitive mechanisms defined by the concept of "social cognition”. In order to identify social cognition disorders, specialists use internationally validated evaluation tests. However, these are most often developed in western, industrialized countries, which could question the relevance of applying them to all humanity.