news

« BACK

Social Sciences



Results 101 - 120 of 2425.


Social Sciences - 08.11.2023
Eye-to-eye contact is rare but shapes our social behavior
Eye-to-eye contact is rare but shapes our social behavior
When speaking to one another, much of the communication occurs nonverbally - through body posture, hand gestures, and the eyes. Our eye gaze during conversations therefore reveals a wealth of information about our attention, intention, or psychological states.

Innovation - Social Sciences - 07.11.2023
Student-made water quality monitor can help isolated communities track safe water sources
Student-made water quality monitor can help isolated communities track safe water sources
Team Bath Biodevices without Borders' portable OASIS device combines miniature testing equipment with GPS to create safe water map. Published on Tuesday 7 November 2023 Last updated on Thursday 9 November 2023 A portable water quality monitor created by a team of University of Bath students could help to rapidly detect and map safe water sources for communities around the world.

Social Sciences - Health - 02.11.2023
The inequality in pension payments over the life course
The inequality in pension payments over the life course
In modern societies, there is great inequality in the amount of pension that men and women receive over the course of their lives. This inequality is a consequence of both the fact that some people live long lives and the fact that the amount of pension people receive varies widely. Although this inequality is larger than inequalities in wages, for example, it is rarely studied.

Health - Social Sciences - 02.11.2023
Increase in mortality from age 65 in the U.S
Increase in mortality from age 65 in the U.S
Life expectancy in the U.S. has stopped increasing since 2010, after decades of steady increase. Meanwhile, most other countries have continued to experience improvements in life expectancy. Previous research has suggested that the poor performance of U.S. is because of high mortality of the working age population.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.10.2023
COVID-19 pandemic and prison compounded risk of overdose deaths by up to 50 per cent
COVID-19 pandemic and prison compounded risk of overdose deaths by up to 50 per cent
People in Ontario who had recently been incarcerated were at far greater risk of opioid toxicity death during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study from a Simon Fraser University researcher. The study, published in the journal PLOS One , by SFU criminologist Amanda Butler and colleagues from McMaster University and the University of Toronto, assessed the impacts of the pandemic on opioid toxicity death rates for individuals exposed and not exposed to incarceration in Ontario.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.10.2023
Mass shooting in Maine: U-M experts available to comment
NOTE: Firearm injury prevention research will be the focus of a national conference next week in Chicago. It is organized by the Research Society for the Prevention of Firearm-Related Harms, of which the University of Michigan is a founding member. University of Michigan experts are available to discuss various aspects of the mass shooting in Maine, from firearm injury prevention to public policy and the psychology of traumatic events with children.

Social Sciences - Health - 24.10.2023
A relational framework for microbiome research that includes Indigenous communities
Research and collection of microbiome samples from Indigenous communities has a history of exploiting and harming Indigenous peoples Research on the trillions of microorganisms that make up a person's microbiome can lead to medical breakthroughs to treat diseases like inflammatory bowel syndrome and diabetes.

Social Sciences - Health - 20.10.2023
A relational framework for ethical microbiome research that includes Indigenous communities
Research and collection of microbiome samples from Indigenous communities has a history of exploiting and harming Indigenous peoples Research on the trillions of microorganisms that make up a person's microbiome can lead to medical breakthroughs to treat diseases like inflammatory bowel syndrome and diabetes.

Environment - Social Sciences - 19.10.2023
Around the Globe, Climate Adaptation Lacks Coordination
Around the Globe, Climate Adaptation Lacks Coordination
Viewed globally, it is above all individuals and households that are pursuing adaptation to the impacts of climate change; systematic networking of the various groups affected is lacking. This is the conclusion reached by an international team of experts from Universität Hamburg's Cluster of Excellence for climate research (CLICCS) and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU).

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 17.10.2023
Social relations in the peninsular Copper Age went from great connectivity to regionalisation in just 300 years
Social relations in the peninsular Copper Age went from great connectivity to regionalisation in just 300 years
Researchers from the University of Valencia have revealed that social relations during the Copper Age in the Iberian Peninsula went from a first homogeneous phase of great connectivity to a more fragmented and regionalised stage. Through the analysis of the ceramic decorations of the Bell Beaker vase, characteristic of the European Chalcolithic and associated with funerary contexts of the elites, the work published in the Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory concludes that these vessels were -democratised- in almost 300 years, with the consequent reinterpretation and heterogenisation.

Environment - Social Sciences - 17.10.2023
U-M-led study investigates lions’ interactions with humans in a diminishing habitat 
Humans and wildlife, including large carnivores, interact at an unprecedented scale as they increasingly share the world's landscapes. A new University of Michigan-led study of human-lion interactions found that lions tend to avoid human-dominated areas unless they are facing food scarcity and habitat fragmentation.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 16.10.2023
The emotional function of dreams is not the same everywhere
The emotional function of dreams is not the same everywhere
By comparing the dreams of Western and non-Western populations, a study by the University of Geneva and the University of Toronto shows that dreams can have a variable emotional function. Why do we dream? A product of our brain's neurophysiology, dreaming is a complex experience that can take on many emotional tones and simulate reality to varying degrees.

Health - Social Sciences - 13.10.2023
Healthcare for millions of pregnant teenage girls is being neglected
Healthcare for millions of pregnant teenage girls is being neglected
The healthcare needs of pregnant adolescents will continue to be ignored in low-and middle-income countries (LMIC) unless there are major changes to healthcare delivery and frameworks, according to a new study by UCL and Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI) researchers.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 13.10.2023
Teachings beyond words
Teachings beyond words
Even in digital courses, it's not just the spoken word that counts. Aspects such as tone of voice, eye contact and the appreciation experienced are also important, as a study by the University of Würzburg shows . With the corona pandemic came its big boom: digital lectures. Depending on the incidence and the respective regulations, lecturers and students met digitally in specially set up Zoom meetings.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 11.10.2023
Killing remains a threat to Bornean orangutans
University of Queensland research has found despite considerable conservation efforts, the illegal killing of critically endangered orangutans on Borneo may be an ongoing threat to the species. PhD candidate Emily Massingham from UQ's Faculty of Science managed a team of researchers which visited 79 villages across the Bornean orangutan range in Kalimantan, conducting face to face interviews with 431 people.

Social Sciences - 09.10.2023
Temporal change in risk tolerance around payday
People living in poverty often struggle from payday to payday. Those who receive government assistance, such as welfare or pensions, must manage scarce resources to make ends meet until the next payment. Researchers from Kobe University, the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Toyo University, and Simon Fraser University have studied how people's willingness to take risks changes before and after payday.

Environment - Social Sciences - 06.10.2023
Amazon may hold over 10,000 hidden earthworks built by pre-Columbian societies
Amazon may hold over 10,000 hidden earthworks built by pre-Columbian societies
The Amazon rainforest may be home to thousands of hidden earthworks, made by pre-Columbian societies. This is revealed by a large international study investigating the distribution of these hidden structures. Biologist Hans ter Steege contributed to the research. "This discovery tells us that certain parts of the forest may not be as old as we initially thought." The dense Amazon Rainforest may hold far more traces of human civilization than previously believed.

Social Sciences - 06.10.2023
Fairer AI systems
Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems are increasingly being used in various aspects of our society. However, we do not always know how the algorithms work and whether the choices they make are fair.

Social Sciences - 05.10.2023
Family expansion is most common reason for relocation
Family expansion is most common reason for relocation
Around 45 percent of the Swiss population is considering moving. More than half of them would like more living space. This is shown by a study conducted by the ZHAW in collaboration with the Federal Office of Housing, the Fédération Romande Immobiličre, the Swiss Homeowners Association and Raiffeisen Switzerland .

Health - Social Sciences - 03.10.2023
Hispanics killed by firearms at twice the rate of whites
U-M analysis of data from 38 states shows significant disparities in firearm injury, death rates among Hispanic populations Study: Firearm homicides among Hispanics and white non-Hispanics: Measuring disparities The rate of firearm homicide among Hispanic populations in the United States was more than two times higher than that of white Americans in 2021, the largest disparity in more than a decade, according to new research led by the University of Michigan.